User: subbu Topic: Climate Change
Category: Impacts :: Glacier
Last updated: Apr 21 2018 21:46 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Sikkim Scientists Discovered “Mathematical Empirical Formula” 21.4.2018 Voice of Sikkim
Gangtok, 21 April (IPR) : The scientific team from Sikkim State Climate Change Cell (NMSHE)under State Council of Science and Technology recently developed a glacial lake volume and area(VA) Equation based on the scientific interventions carried out at South Lhonak Lake. The scientific team who are involved in the development of this Empirical equation are […]
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Himalayas wettest, warmest on record: Researchers 29.3.2018 All News-IANS Stories
Recent decades have been the wettest and warmest on record in the Himalayas, say researchers who are alarmed that a "warming signature" has led to an overall rise in mercury levels and the retreat of glaciers.
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World glacier melting passes point of no return: Study 21.3.2018 DNA: Wide Angle
The further melting of glaciers worldwide cannot be prevented in the current century - even if all the emissions are curtailed, a study has found. However, due to the slow reaction of glaciers to climate change, human activity will have a massive impact beyond the 21st century, according to the study published in the journal Nature Climate Change. In the long run, 500 metres by car with a mid-range vehicle will cost one kilogramme of glacier ice, researchers said. In the Paris Agreement, 195 member states of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change agreed to limit the rise in global average temperature to significantly below two degrees Celsius. Researchers at The University of Bremen in Germany and the University of Innsbruck in Austria calculated the effects of compliance with these climate goals on the progressive melting of glaciers. "Melting glaciers have a huge influence on the development of sea level rise," said Georg Kaser from the University of Innsbruck. "In our calculations, ...
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Worldwide glacier melting can't be prevented in this century: Study 21.3.2018 Zee News : Science and Technology
According to researchers, 500 meters by car with a mid-range vehicle will cost one kilogram of glacier ice in the long run.
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Disaster assured: Too late to save 1/3 of world's glaciers, say researchers 21.3.2018 Zee News : Science and Technology
Every 1 km you drive in your car will make 2 kg of glacier ice to melt after 2100.
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World glacier melting passes point of no return: study 21.3.2018 General News
The further melting of glaciers worldwide cannot be prevented in the current century - even if all the emissions are curtailed, a study has found. However, due to the slow reaction of glaciers to climate change, human activity will have a massive impact beyond the 21st century, according to the study published in the journal Nature Climate Change. In the long run, 500 metres by car with a mid-range vehicle will cost one kilogramme of glacier ice, researchers said. In the Paris Agreement, 195 member states of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change agreed to limit the rise in global average temperature to significantly below two degrees Celsius. Researchers at The University of Bremen in Germany and the University of Innsbruck in Austria calculated the effects of compliance with these climate goals on the progressive melting of glaciers. "Melting glaciers have a huge influence on the development of sea level rise," said Georg Kaser from the University of ...
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Sea level fears as more of giant Antarctic glacier floating than thought 20.3.2018 General News
More of a giant France-sized glacier in Antarctica is floating on the ocean than previously thought, scientists said today, raising fears it could melt faster as the climate warms and have a dramatic impact on rising sea-levels. The Totten Glacier is one of the fastest-flowing and largest glaciers in Antarctica with scientists keen to keep a close eye on how it melts given the enormous amount of water it could potentially unleash. Using artificially created seismic waves that help scientists see through the ice, researchers have discovered that more of the Totten Glacier floats on the ocean than initially thought. "In some locations we thought were grounded, we detected the ocean below indicating that the glacier is in fact floating," said Paul Winberry from Central Washington University, who spent the summer in Antarctica studying the Totten. The findings are important because recent studies have shown the Totten Glacier's underbelly is already being eroded by warm, salty sea water ..
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Fighting climate change: How a 'crazy' engineer solved Ladakh's water crisis 11.3.2018 Zee News : States
Chewang Norphel -- a civil engineer with the Jammu and Kashmir Rural Development Department -- took inspiration from his childhood observations and made a breakthrough by devising the first artificial glacier in picturesque Leh.
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Fighting climate change: How a 'crazy' engineer solved Ladakh's water crisis (IANS Special Series) 11.3.2018 All News-IANS Stories
Years back, on a harsh winter morning in Ladakh in the northernmost Himalayas in India, a young and curious boy in a remote mountain village of the cold desert observed water coming out of a semi-frozen pipe, collecting in a small crater on the ground and freezing, just like a glacier.
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Climate change causing avalanches, cold injuries to soldiers 7.3.2018 All News-IANS Stories
Admitting that climate change in high altitude areas was having an impact on soldiers stationed there, the government told the Lok Sabha on Wednesday that the adverse impact is visible in form of avalanches and cold injuries.
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Glaciers melting in Gilgit-Baltistan due to CPEC project 4.3.2018 General News
Thirty-six glacial lakes in various valleys of Gilgit-Baltistan have been declared dangerous with seven of them posing a major threat to the people, said a survey by Focus Pakistan, an NGO.After conducting the survey, experts attending a seminar in Islamabad said Gilgit-Baltistan is highly vulnerable to climate change.The surge of the Khurdopin Glacier in Shimshal Valley, Hunza, and the formation of a lake, has emerged as a major cause of concern for geologists and local residents."The Khurdopin Glacier has touched the mountain which has formed a small lake. The lake is frozen at the moment, but from March onward, when the ice starts melting, the flow of water would be intense. We are not predicting immense damage, but footbridges and Shimshal Valley, which is very narrow in nature; the road there might get affected, said Dr. Nazeer Ahmed.Officials from Gilgit Baltistan Disaster Management Authority, who were present during the seminar, are seeking help to install an alarming device ..
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Ice stupa of Ladakh solving water crisis 24.2.2018 General News
An innovative manmade artificial ice stupa has been created in Leh to conserve winter waste water to address the water scarcity during spring.The stupa has become a centre of attraction for thousands of tourist including locals.The natural glacier formed out of winter snowfall on higher reaches of mountain serves as main source of water supply in Ladakh region for farmers.As the global warming resulted in shrinking of natural glaciers the farmers in Ladakh are facing acute shortage of water for irrigation especially during the spring season.The winter waste water is stored in the shape of ice stupas which melts slowly during spring time thus providing an alternate source of water supply when natural glaciers don't melt properly at a point of time in spring.The excess water from artificial ice stupa is stored in a tank constructed below it.One of volunteer Sonam Dorjay (24), from Wakha village working on ice stupa, said that he had been working on it for the past four years and it ...
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A university helps conserve mountain economies facing climate brunt 23.2.2018 All News-IANS Stories
A research-based university near here in Himachal Pradesh is working for mountain people and its fragile biodiversity -- that is facing the brunt of climate change -- by researching and piloting programmes on high-value products, innovative livelihood options and rural income-generation strategies.
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Citing India, UNGA President says world needs science for addressing water scarcity 21.2.2018 General News
Citing a project in India where farmers are using solar-powered pumps to access groundwater for irrigation, UN General Assembly president Miroslav Lajcak has said that the world needs science for tackling global water scarcity. Noting that the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development calls for making sure that there is water and sanitation for all, Lajcak yesterday said water is critical for achieving all Sustainable Development Goals but world leaders are not doing enough. "We need science for solutions. Science now helps us to calculate how population growth and climate change will affect the availability of water; It helps us track the shifting of rivers in order to help predict floods; In India there is a project where farmers use solar-powered pumps to access groundwater for crop irrigation, Lajcak said in his address to the 'Science for Water' conference convened by UNESCO and Joint Research Centre of the European Commission. "In Nairobi I met a young lady from Burkina Faso who ..
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'Warm' winter may thaw Scottish skiing industry: Report 9.2.2018 General News
The Scottish skiing industry could collapse within as little as 50 years as winters become too mild for regular snowfall, a new international report warns.
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Scientists discover enormous reserves of mercury in permafrost 6.2.2018 General News
Scientists have discovered massive reserves of mercury hidden in permafrost.Permafrost is a thick subsurface layer of soil that remains below freezing point throughout the year, occurring chiefly in polar regions.Researchers have discovered permafrost in the northern hemisphere stores massive amounts of natural mercury, a finding with significant implications for human health and ecosystems worldwide as exposure to mercury - even small amounts - can cause serious health problems.The study reveals the northern permafrost soils are the largest reservoir of mercury on the planet, storing nearly twice as much mercury as all other soils, the ocean and the atmosphere combined.In a new study, scientists measured mercury concentrations in permafrost cores from Alaska and estimated how much mercury has been trapped in permafrost north of the equator since the last Ice Age."This discovery is a game-changer," said Paul Schuster, a hydrologist at the U.S. Geological Survey in Boulder, Colorado ...
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Sustained black carbon emission from aeroplanes can warm 5.2.2018 General News
The impact of black carbon, emitted by aeroplanes, on monsoon, glaciers and ozone layer is "uncertain", but its sustained emission could lead to warming of the atmosphere at 10-12 km altitude, the government said today. Minister of State for Environment Mahesh Sharma informed the Rajya Sabha that studies have shown that black carbon emitted by aeroplanes can reach the stratosphere. "As per information provided by the Department of Science and Technology, aeroplanes emit black carbon into the atmosphere. Sustained emission of black carbon from aeroplanes may create a layer of black carbon at around 10 to 12 km altitude and could warm the atmosphere at that level," he said. "However, the impact of black carbon on monsoon, glaciers and ozone layer is quite uncertain," Sharma said. He said there have been laboratory experiments which showed that black carbon can act as a neutral surface for ozone depleting reactions. "However, high altitude balloon experiments simultaneous .
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On thin ice in the arctic 30.1.2018 FrontLine: Home
Interview with Vishnu Nandan, polar researcher and lead author of a study report that suggests that Arctic sea ice is melting faster than previously estimated by satellite data. By R. KRISHNAKUMAR
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Donald Trump baffles scientists; says ice caps are 'setting records' 29.1.2018 DNA: Urban Tales
On Monday, scientists expressed bafflement over US President Donald Trump's assertion that ice caps are "setting records" when much of the world's ice from the Alps to the Andes is melting amid global warming. Trump cast doubt on mainstream scientific findings about climate change in an interview aired on Britain's ITV channel on Sunday night, saying "there's a cooling and there's a heating". — Piers Morgan (@piersmorgan) January 28, 2018 "The ice caps were going to melt, they were going to be gone by now. But now they're setting records. They're at a record level," he said. Many people use the term "ice cap" to refer to polar sea ice or vast ice sheets on Greenland and Antarctica. It is also a technical term for smaller masses of ice on land, ending in glaciers. AP FACT CHECK: 10 scientists & data throw cold water on President Trump's climate claims of cooling & warming and record high ice cap https://t.co/fJfSRjRUNv pic.twitter.com/woBAAPfkyj — seth borenstein (@borenbears) January 28, 2018 "Glaciers ...
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It’s High Time the Government Took Notice of Kashmir’s Changing Climate 25.1.2018 The Wire

Uncharacteristically warm winters, disappearing snow cover and melting glaciers have already dealt a blow to winter tourism in the region. Horticulture and agriculture are likely next in line.

The post It’s High Time the Government Took Notice of Kashmir’s Changing Climate appeared first on The Wire.

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