User: subbu Topic: Climate Change
Category: Impacts :: Generic
Last updated: May 27 2018 19:43 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Modi asks people to shun plastic, imbibe environmental responsibility 27.5.2018 General News
Citing the adverse effects of plastic, Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Sunday appealed to the people not to use things made by using low grade materials.
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India delighted to host World Environment Day: PM Modi 27.5.2018 General News
Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Sunday expressed his happiness over India officially hosting this year's World Environment Day.Addressing the nation on the 44th edition of 'Mann Ki Baat', the Prime Minister said, "On the 5th of June, our nation will officially host the World Environment Day Celebrations. This is a very important achievement for India and also a recognition of India's growing leadership in the direction of tackling climate change."The Prime Minister spoke about this year's theme- 'Beat Plastic Pollution' and appealed to the citizens to not use low-grade polythenes, plastics and try to curb the negative impact of plastic pollution on the environment, wildlife and health.He also urged people to set a target of achieving record plantation of trees with the onset of the rainy season and maintain the saplings till they grow.Speaking about the dust storms that had engulfed the country earlier this month, the Prime Minister said that 'the calamities are basically the result ..
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In Mann ki Baat, PM Modi urges people to shun plastics 27.5.2018 Rediff: Top Stories (India)
In his radio address, the PM asked the people to observe the World Environment Day on June 5 with vigour, and that it was time to concentrate on tree plantation.
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Narendra Modi discourages use of plastic 27.5.2018 Hindu: National
The theme of the day this time is “Beat Plastic Pollution”.
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Modi discourages use of plastic 27.5.2018 General News
Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Sunday spoke of the adverse effects of plastic and appealed to people not to use things made by using low grade materials .
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PM urges people to shun plastics 27.5.2018 General News
Prime Minister Narendra Modi today urged the people to shun low-grade plastic and polythene, saying it was creating a negative impact on the environment, wildlife and the health of the people. He asked the people to observe the World Environment Day on June 5 with vigour, and that it was time to concentrate on tree plantation. Planting saplings is not enough, people should ensure that they care for a plant till it becomes a tree, Modi said. "Protecting environment and being sensitive towards nature should come naturally. The recent dust storms accompanied by rains was unseasonal. The climate pattern led to the loss of life and property. It is a result of change in weather pattern," he said in his monthly 'Mann ki baat' radio address. "Whenever we face a torrid summer, or floods, incessant rains or unbearable cold, everybody becomes an expert, analysing global warming and climate change. But does empty talk bring about any solutions? Being sensitive towards nature, protecting nature, ..
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Dino-killing asteroid caused Earth to heat up for one lakh years 27.5.2018 Hindu: Home
The Chicxulub asteroid that hit 65 million years ago drove a long-lasting era of global warming, with a rapid increase of 5 degree Celsius
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Dino-killing asteroid caused Earth to heat up for 100,000 years 27.5.2018 DNA: Recent Columns
The Chicxulub asteroid - which caused the extinction of dinosaurs - drove a long-lasting era of global warming when it smashed into Earth 65 million years ago, with a rapid temperature increase of 5 degree Celsius that endured for roughly 100,000 years, a study has found. The monumental event is a rare case where Earth's systems were perturbed at a rate greater than what's occurring now from human activity. It provides valuable insights into what may happen from sudden, extreme environmental changes. The after-effects of the Chicxulub impact remain debated, with some scientists advocating that soot within the atmosphere blocked out the Sun sufficiently to drive global cooling. Others suggest that carbon released from the Earth's crust into the atmosphere upon the asteroid's impact, as well as carbon from wildfires, had a warming effect. To better understand how the temperature changed during this time, researchers - including those from University of Missouri and University of Colorado Boulder in the US ...
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Dino-killing asteroid caused Earth to heat up for 100,000 years 27.5.2018 General News
The Chicxulub asteroid - which caused the extinction of dinosaurs - drove a long-lasting era of global warming when it smashed into Earth 65 million years ago, with a rapid temperature increase of 5 degree Celsius that endured for roughly 100,000 years, a study has found. The monumental event is a rare case where Earth's systems were perturbed at a rate greater than what's occurring now from human activity. It provides valuable insights into what may happen from sudden, extreme environmental changes. The after-effects of the Chicxulub impact remain debated, with some scientists advocating that soot within the atmosphere blocked out the Sun sufficiently to drive global cooling. Others suggest that carbon released from the Earth's crust into the atmosphere upon the asteroid's impact, as well as carbon from wildfires, had a warming effect. To better understand how the temperature changed during this time, researchers - including those from University of Missouri and University of ...
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Climate change may increase arable land: Study 25.5.2018 General News
Climate change could expand the agricultural feasibility of the global boreal region by 44 per cent by the end of the century, according to a study. However, the scientists warn that the same climate trends that would increase land suitable for crop growth in that area could significantly change the global climatic water balance - negatively impacting agriculture in the rest of the world. Scientists from the University of Leeds in the UK assessed the impact of climate change on land that could support agriculture in the boreal region, which includes large sections of Canada, Sweden, Norway, Finland, Russia and the US. They found that the upper edge of land suitable for crop growth could shift as far north as 1,200km from the current position with the most dramatic changes occurring in the inner-continental regions of North America and Eurasia. Currently only 32 per cent of the boreal region falls into 'growing degree days' - the climate parameter linked to crop growth - and rainfall ..
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Climate change and cricket: This is what Boards are doing to ensure we have full games 25.5.2018 DNA: Money
Earlier this month, a series of thunderstorms and dust storms left a lot of destruction in five north Indian states. A number of factors including unusually high temperatures in Rajasthan, western disturbances, and cyclonic circulation over Haryana, just to name a few were the main factors. While people have said that it was a freak accident, experts say that climate change will likely fuel more such storms. Climate change has had adverse effects on our lives, and in the process, has also affected the way we play sports. A report by Climate Coalition, a UK-based group that studied climate change, examined its impact on a range of sports. The report adds that recreational cricket is most at threat due to fixture disruption and damage to facilities. Citing Glamorgan Cricket Club in Cardiff, the report says that since 2000, they have lost more than 1300 hours of cricket – equivalent to 217 days or at least 20,000 overs. "Across the whole County Championship, at least 175 days - around 16,000 overs - have ...
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Global warming may have ‘devastating’ effects on rice 24.5.2018 Hindu: Internet
As CO2 rises due to the burning of fossil fuels, rice will lose some of its protein and vitamin content, putting millions of people at risk of malnutrition,
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BharatNet, National Knowledge Network to help IMD make accurate weather forecast 23.5.2018 DNA: Wide Angle
The two ambitious broadband projects of the government -- BharatNet and National Knowledge Network (NKN) -- once completed will enable the country's weather department to make long term predictions and boost accuracy of the weather forecast. While BharatNet is part of the telecom ministry, NKN is under the purview of ministry of IT and electronics. The ministries are in discussions with IMD (India Meteorological Department) to use the high-speed broadband network at village/panchayat level which can improve the accuracy of the data collected manifold, a senior government functionary told DNA Money. The plan is to install observatories in all districts and panchayats, which will enable IMD to gather accurate data at the ground level. The information will be critical keeping in mind the impact of global warming and other environmental changes. It will also improve weather predictions of various issues, including drought, monsoon and others which can go a long way in helping agricultural economy. NKN ...
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Decoded: Impact of climate change on river ecosystems 22.5.2018 DNA: Wide Angle
According to a recent study, climate change can impact fragile river ecosystems all over the world. Research undertaken in South Africa's Kruger National Park (KNP) has shown that increasing frequency of cyclone-driven extreme floods is responsible for destroying some of the world's most sensitive and valuable riverine habitats. Researchers from the universities of Hull, Aberystwyth, and Salford and the engineering consultants "Architecture, Engineering, Consulting, Operations, and Maintenance" (AECOM), used laser survey technology (LiDAR) flown from an aircraft, to measure the impacts of cyclone-driven extreme floods in 2000 and 2012 on rivers in KNP. KNP game reserve has global significance for its habitats and associated species, and the rivers flowing through the park provide essential ecosystem services, including water and habitat in the shape of the many varied channel morphologies and associated riparian forest. The high-resolution data has been used to create accurate digital models of the river ...
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Expert warns of irrevocable biodiversity damage with rising temperature 20.5.2018 All News-IANS Stories
A 3.2 degree Celsius increase in the Earth's temperature could see 47 per cent of insect species, 26 per cent of vertebrate and 16 per cent of plant species lose at least half of their geographic ranges, an expert on global change has said.
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Vice President calls for increased investments in agriculture 19.5.2018 Govt of india: PIB
The Vice President of India, Shri M. Venkaiah Naidu has suggested to the Central and various State Governments to increase investments in agriculture and allied sectors to make farming viable and attractive.
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Green corridor may take heavy toll on trees 19.5.2018 Hindu: Fitness
NHAI claim on project disputed
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‘Clean air policy needs more focus on health’ 18.5.2018 Hindu: National
Doctors say draft NCAP falls short
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India Calls for Judicious Use of Resources at 4th Brics Ministerial Meeting in Durban 18.5.2018 Govt of india: PIB
India has called for a judicious use of resources amidst concerns over resource depletion and scarcity.  Addressing the 4th BRICS Ministerial meeting in Durban, South Africa today, Union Minister for Environment, Forest and Climate Change, Dr. Harsh Vardhan has said that a decrease in global materials, or at least stabilization at present levels, demand major reductions in metabolic rates in the Asia-Pacific region, especially India.
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Only 1 pct of Japan's biggest coral reef healthy: survey 18.5.2018 General News
Japan's biggest coral reef has not recovered from bleaching due to rising sea temperatures, with only one per cent of the reef in a healthy condition, according to a government study. The overall volume of coral in Sekisei Lagoon in southwestern Japan near Okinawa had already plunged by 80 per cent since the late 1980s due to rising water temperatures and damage caused by coral-eating starfish. Now only 1.4 per cent of the lagoon, which stretches over 67.89 square kilometres, is in a healthy condition, the environment ministry said, after it was hit by mass bleaching in 1998, 2001, 2007 and most recently 2016. "If coral reefs don't recover, it means a loss of rich fauna for a variety of creatures and would have grave impact on the ecosystem in the region," ministry official Chihiro Kondo told AFP today. For the first time since 2008, the ministry analysed satellite photos and information from some 1,000 monitoring sites for the Sekisei Lagoon and two other reefs around the Ishigaki ...
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