User: subbu Topic: Climate Change
Category: Greenhouse Gases
Last updated: Jul 06 2015 16:39 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Oceans need big reduction in greenhouse gases 6.7.2015 Zee News : Science and Technology
Our oceans need an immediate and substantial reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Otherwise, there will be far-reaching and irreversible impacts on marine ecosystems, says a study.
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Oceans Need Big Reduction in Greenhouse Gases 6.7.2015 newindianexpress.com
This would in turn have massive impacts on all areas in which human beings use the oceans whether in capture fisheries, tourism or in coastal protection.
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Oceans need big reduction in greenhouse gases 6.7.2015 All News-IANS Stories
Our oceans need an immediate and substantial reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Otherwise, there will be far-reaching and irreversible impacts on marine ecosystems, says a study.
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India's green steps turn talking point 6.7.2015 TOI: All Headlines
India's green steps turn talking point
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Paris talks to push for voluntary hike in em... 6.7.2015 TOI: All Headlines
Paris talks to push for voluntary hike in em...
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No plan B if Paris climate summit ends in failure, says EU climate chief 6.7.2015 The Guardian -- Front Page

Exclusive: Miguel Cañete urges world leaders to force their ministers to agree a deal

There is “no plan B” if the Paris climate conference ends in failure, Europe’s climate chief has warned, urging world leaders to intervene to force their ministers to agree a landmark deal this December.

In an exclusive interview with the Guardian, Miguel Cañete, commissioner for climate action, said he was very concerned about the lack of negotiating time remaining before the conference.

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All eyes now on Paris conference 5.7.2015 Asian Age: Editorial
What is charitably referred to as “dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system” in the text of the United Nations UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, is in reality an act of industrial warfare against climate and its allied ecosystem whose impact has become glaring. Its continued relevance for the communities of shared fate and global order is linked to the decision by the richest countries to undergo mandatory de-addiction. But for long these countries have adopted an ostrich-like policy. They are planning to deal with fossil-fuel addiction by the 2100, 85 years from now. Ahead of the Paris climate meeting by the end of 2015, when the world's biggest polluter, China, submitted its voluntary Intended Nationally Determined Con-tributions to the Secretariat of UNFCCC, comparisons between similar commitments by USA and EU have occupied centre stage. China aims to achieve the peaking of carbon dioxide emissions around 2030. It plans to lower Co2 emissions per unit of GDP by 60 to 65 ...
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Carbon tax repeal sparks jump in Australia's electricity emissions 5.7.2015 Guardian: Environment

A 4.3% rise in electricity emissions counters Australia’s credibility in the lead-up to the Paris climate talks, the Climate Council says

Electricity emissions have jumped since the repeal of the carbon tax, the Climate Council says.

The council cites new data by consultants Pitt & Sherry, showing carbon dioxide emissions from the electricity grid went up 6.4m tonnes in the last financial year since the tax was axed.

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All eyes now on Paris conference 5.7.2015 Asian Age: Editorial
What is charitably referred to as “dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system” in the text of the United Nations UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, is in reality an act of industrial warfare against climate and its allied ecosystem whose impact has become glaring. Its continued relevance for the communities of shared fate and global order is linked to the decision by the richest countries to undergo mandatory de-addiction. But for long these countries have adopted an ostrich-like policy. They are planning to deal with fossil-fuel addiction by the 2100, 85 years from now. Ahead of the Paris climate meeting by the end of 2015, when the world's biggest polluter, China, submitted its voluntary Intended Nationally Determined Con-tributions to the Secretariat of UNFCCC, comparisons between similar commitments by USA and EU have occupied centre stage. China aims to achieve the peaking of carbon dioxide emissions around 2030. It plans to lower Co2 emissions per unit of GDP by 60 to 65 ...
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Peatlands burn as gamekeepers create landscape fit for grouse-shooting 5.7.2015 The Guardian -- Front Page
Climate change experts say burning heather to increase bird yields is a threat to protected peat bogs

They are home to a diverse range of wildlife and up to 8,000 years old. And, according to a damning analysis by an independent government advisory body, the UK’s upland peat bogs are facing a sustained threat from the shooting classes’ desire to bag grouse.

The Committee on Climate Change’s 2015 progress report to parliament notes: “Wetland habitats, including the majority of upland areas with carbon-rich peat soils, are in poor condition. The damaging practice of burning peat to increase grouse yields continues, including on internationally protected sites.”

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All eyes now on Paris conference 5.7.2015 Asian Age: Editorial
What is charitably referred to as “dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system” in the text of the United Nations UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, is in reality an act of industrial warfare against climate and its allied ecosystem whose impact has become glaring. Its continued relevance for the communities of shared fate and global order is linked to the decision by the richest countries to undergo mandatory de-addiction. But for long these countries have adopted an ostrich-like policy. They are planning to deal with fossil-fuel addiction by the 2100, 85 years from now. Ahead of the Paris climate meeting by the end of 2015, when the world's biggest polluter, China, submitted its voluntary Intended Nationally Determined Con-tributions to the Secretariat of UNFCCC, comparisons between similar commitments by USA and EU have occupied centre stage. China aims to achieve the peaking of carbon dioxide emissions around 2030. It plans to lower Co2 emissions per unit of GDP by 60 to 65 ...
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New coal plants 'most urgent' threat to the planet, warns OECD head 3.7.2015 Guardian: Environment

Governments urged to rethink plans for new coal-fired power plants as study estimates they will release more than 500bn tonnes of carbon dioxide by 2050


Governments must rethink plans for new coal-fired power plants around the world, as these are now the “most urgent” threat to the future of the planet, the head of the OECD has warned.

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Time to call a spade a spade 3.7.2015 HBL: Home
Climate talks have drifted away from the principle of equity and differentiated responsibility. India must bring it back on track
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Oceans face massive and irreversible impacts without carbon cuts – study 3.7.2015 Guardian: Environment

Business-as-usual carbon emissions would cause global warming that brings serious ocean acidification, death of corals and mangroves, scientists say

Time is rapidly running out for the world’s oceans and the creatures that live in them as the Earth’s climate continues to warm, say scientists.

Only “immediate and substantial” reductions in greenhouse gas emissions can hope to prevent “massive” impacts on marine ecosystems, warn the experts.

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Prince Charles: rewire the global economy to stop climate change 3.7.2015 Guardian: Environment

Heir to the throne calls for end to ‘business as usual’ approach that does nothing to avert catastrophic global warming – and praises Guardian’s climate campaign

Prince Charles has said that “profound changes” to the global economic system are needed in order to avert environmental catastrophe, in an uncompromising speech delivered in front of an audience of senior business leaders and politicians.

The heir to the throne – often criticised for his meddling in political affairs – argued that ending the taxpayer subsidies enjoyed by coal, oil and gas companies could reduce the carbon emissions driving climate change by an estimated 13%.

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New study warns of dangerous climate change risks to the Earth’s oceans | Dana Nuccitelli 2.7.2015 The Guardian -- Front Page
Immediate, serious efforts to curb carbon pollution are needed to minimize ocean ecosystem changes A new paper just published in Science summarizes the projected impacts of climate change on the world’s oceans, and consequently on humans and our economy. The study concludes that global warming beyond the international limit of 2°C above pre-industrial temperatures would pose serious threats to marine ecosystems and their millions of human dependents. It builds on the consensus science published by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change last year. The study concludes, Ocean changes associated with a 2°C warming of global surface temperature carries high risks of impacts and should not be ...
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Jairam Ramesh: India can't remain on the path of further destruction 2.7.2015 Guardian: Environment
Former environment minister believes the cult of unfettered economic growth has been ruinous for India’s environment, reports Yale Environment 360 Jairam Ramesh was a self-described “economic hawk” when he became India’s environment minister in 2009, figuring that the country’s ecological problems could wait as India lifted its people out of poverty. But by the time he left his post in 2011 , he had become an environmental hawk after witnessing how India’s rapidly expanding economy and soaring population had caused widespread pollution and destruction of the environment. Today, Ramesh is one of the most outspoken critics of India’s environmental policy under prime minister Narendra Modi, who, despite his support of major investments in renewable energy, is otherwise widely criticized by conservationists for putting economic growth ahead of environmental preservation. This balance between economic growth and environmental protection is a core theme in Ramesh’s recently published book, Green Signals — ...
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Chinese INDCs will not keep global temperature rise below 2OC, says CSE 2.7.2015 New Kerala: World News
New Delhi, July 1 : In a major development, China, the world's largest greenhouse gas (GHG) emitter, has submitted its Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs) to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).
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Heathrow expansion risks deepening London's air pollution crisis 1.7.2015 Guardian: Environment

A third runway could throw air quality standards and UK climate targets to the wind

The UK government’s Airports Commission has recommended that a new runway at Heathrow should go ahead, but only with a legally binding commitment to control air and noise pollution.

If the government decides to act on Howard Davies’ recommendation (and doing so would be a political minefield) Londoners will be forgiven for treating any air quality guarantees with a heavy pinch of salt.

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China climate pledges easily achievable, experts say 1.7.2015 Zee News : Science and Technology
China`s pledges ahead of a major climate change conference in Paris lack ambition and are easily achievable, experts said Wednesday, adding Beijing could offer more.
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