User: subbu Topic: Climate Change
Category: Greenhouse Gases
Last updated: Jun 22 2018 20:16 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Making India carbon-neutral 22.6.2018 Hindu: Religion
We must invest in mass public transport, sustainable constructions, and massive green cover, says Nidhi Adlakha
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Global warming cooks up ‘a different world’ over three decades 18.6.2018 Hindu: Energy & Environment
Earth is noticeably hotter, the weather stormier and more extreme.
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Volcanic eruptions and declining oxygen levels killing marine life 12.6.2018 DNA: Wide Angle
The very recent volcanic eruptions in Guatemala and Hawaii have left the world in a state of shock with their ensuing devastation. However, the concern is emerging as more of a global concern. According to a study conducted by the Florida State University, global climate change, fueled by skyrocketing levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide, is siphoning oxygen from today's oceans at an alarming pace - so fast that scientists aren't entirely sure how the planet will respond. Their only hint is to look to the past. In a study, researchers did just that - and what they found brought into stark relief the disastrous effects a deoxygenated ocean could have on marine life. Millions of years ago, scientists discovered, powerful volcanoes pumped Earth's atmosphere full of carbon dioxide, draining the oceans of oxygen and driving a mass extinction of marine organisms. "We want to understand how volcanism, which can be related to modern anthropogenic carbon dioxide release, manifests itself in ocean chemistry and ...
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Fly less and eat healthy to cut warming 5.6.2018 Hindu: National
Global warming can be limited to 1.5 degrees Celsius by improving the energy efficiency of our everyday activities such as travel, indoor heating and
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Older Amazonian forests help regulate global climate 4.6.2018 DNA: Top News
Turns out, tall and older Amazonian forests help in regulating global climate system. According to a research conducted by the Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science, photosynthesis in tall Amazonian forests - forests above 30m - is three times less sensitive to precipitation variability than in shorter forests of less than 20m. Tropical rainforests play a critical role in regulating the global climate system - they represent the Earth's largest terrestrial CO2 sink. Because of its broad geographical expanse and year-long productivity, the Amazon is the key to the global carbon and hydrological cycles. Climate change could threaten the fate of rainforests, but there is great uncertainty about the future ability of rainforests to store carbon. While severe droughts have occurred in recent years in the Amazon watershed, causing widespread tree mortality and affecting the forests' ability to store carbon, the drivers of tropical rainforests' sensitivity to drought are poorly ...
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Why Green Buildings are an Imperative and not a choice 4.6.2018 Sify Finance
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Nepal leads the way in cutting emissions in brick kilns 30.5.2018 Hindu: Gadgets
Redesigned ovens, zig-zag stacking of bricks reduces pollution
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Limiting global warming may prevent millions of dengue cases 29.5.2018 General News
Limiting global warming to 1.5 degree Celsius could prevent around 3.3 million cases of dengue fever ever year in Latin America and the Caribbean alone, a study has found. The study published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that limiting warming to the goal of the UN Paris Agreement would also stop dengue spreading to areas where incidence is currently low. A global warming trajectory of 3.7 degree Celsius could lead to an increase of up to 7.5 million additional cases per year by the middle of this century. Dengue fever is a tropical disease caused by a virus that is spread by mosquitoes, with symptoms including fever, headache, muscle and joint pain. It is endemic to over 100 countries, and infects around 390 million people worldwide each year, with an estimated 54 million cases in Latin America and the Caribbean. Since the mosquitoes that carry and transmit the virus thrive in warm and humid conditions, it is more commonly found in areas with ...
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Reducing global warming can prevent millions of dengue cases: Study 29.5.2018 All News-IANS Stories
Limiting global warming below 1.5 degrees Celsius, as per the UN Paris Agreement, would stop dengue spreading to areas where incidence is currently low, say researchers.
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Here's another reason to limit global warming ASAP 29.5.2018 General News
Global warming has become a major concern for the world's general population and the scientists.The researchers from the University of East Anglia have found another reason of why global warming should be limited as soon as possible for health reasons.According to their research, limiting global warming to 1.5 degree Celsius could avoid around 3.3 million cases of dengue fever per year in Latin America and the Caribbean alone.The new report revealed that limiting warming to the goal of the UN Paris Agreement would also stop dengue spreading to areas where incidence is currently low.A global warming trajectory of 3.7 degree Celsius could lead to an increase of up to 7.5 million additional cases per year by the middle of this century.Dengue fever is a tropical disease caused by a virus that is spread by mosquitoes, with symptoms including fever, headache, muscle and joint pain. It is endemic to over 100 countries, and infects around 390 million people worldwide each year, with an ...
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Older Amazonian forests help regulate global climate 29.5.2018 General News
Turns out, tall and older Amazonian forests help in regulating global climate system.According to a research conducted by the Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science, photosynthesis in tall Amazonian forests - forests above 30m - is three times less sensitive to precipitation variability than in shorter forests of less than 20m.Tropical rainforests play a critical role in regulating the global climate system - they represent the Earth's largest terrestrial CO2 sink. Because of its broad geographical expanse and year-long productivity, the Amazon is the key to the global carbon and hydrological cycles.Climate change could threaten the fate of rainforests, but there is great uncertainty about the future ability of rainforests to store carbon. While severe droughts have occurred in recent years in the Amazon watershed, causing widespread tree mortality and affecting the forests' ability to store carbon, the drivers of tropical rainforests' sensitivity to drought are
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All nations including US will ratify 2016 climate deal: UNEP 27.5.2018 General News
All nations including the US and India will certainly ratify a key 2016 climate deal, hugely important for fighting climate change, UN Environment Chief Erik Solheim said. About 200 nations, including India, the US and China, had struck a legally-binding deal in the Rwandan capital Kigali in 2016 after intense negotiations to phase down climate-damaging refrigerant gas hydrofluorocarbons known as HFCs that have global warming potential thousand times more than carbon dioxide. The deal, formally known as the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol, is now open for ratification and 35 nations have ratified it so far. "The Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol will for sure be ratified by all nations," Solheim told PTI in an interview here. The statement of the Executive Director of the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) came amid concerns over the actions of the Donald Trump administration. The Trump administration had pulled out of the key Paris Climate Change ...
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Global warming may have ‘devastating’ effects on rice 24.5.2018 Hindu: Internet
As CO2 rises due to the burning of fossil fuels, rice will lose some of its protein and vitamin content, putting millions of people at risk of malnutrition,
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Families from 8 countries sue EU over climate change: lawyers 24.5.2018 General News
Ten families from Europe, Kenya, and Fiji have filed suit against the European Union over global warming threats to their homes and livelihoods, their lawyers said today. The 30-odd plaintiffs before the European Court of Justice in Luxembourg insist the bloc must do more to limit climate change caused by greenhouse gas emissions, and point to drought, glacier melt, sea level rise and flooding that will worsen as temperatures rise.
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Families from 8 countries sue EU over climate change 24.5.2018 General News
Ten families from Europe, Kenya, and Fiji have filed suit against the European Union over global warming threats to their homes and livelihoods, their lawyers said today. They insist the bloc must do more to limit climate change caused by greenhouse gas emissions, and point to drought, glacier melt, sea level rise and flooding that will worsen as temperatures rise. The plaintiffs before the European Court of Justice are "families living near the coast, families owning forests in Portugal, families in the mountains that see the glaciers melting, families in the north that are affected by permafrost melting," their lawer Roda Verheyen told AFP. They "are already being impacted by climate change, already incurring damage... and they are saying: 'EU, you have to do what you can to protect us because otherwise our damage will be catastrophical'," Verheyen said. The claim, nicknamed the "People's Climate Case", is the first of its kind brought against the EU, the group's lawyers ...
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Earth may become 4 degrees warmer by 2084: Study 24.5.2018 General News
The Earth's average temperature may increase by four degrees Celsius, compared to pre-industrial levels, before the end of 21st century, a study claims. This increase translates to more annual and seasonal warming over land than over the ocean, with significant warming in the Arctic, researchers said. "A great many record-breaking heat events, heavy floods, and extreme droughts would occur if global warming crosses the four degrees celsius level, with respect to the preindustrial period," said Dabang Jiang, a senior researcher at the Chinese Academy of Sciences. "The temperature increase would cause severe threats to ecosystems, human systems, and associated societies and economies," Jiang said. In the study published in the journal Advances in Atmospheric Sciences, researchers used the parameters of scenario in which there was no mitigation of rising greenhouse gas emissions. They compared 39 coordinated climate model experiments from the fifth phase of the Coupled Model ...
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Expert warns of irrevocable biodiversity damage with rising temperature 20.5.2018 All News-IANS Stories
A 3.2 degree Celsius increase in the Earth's temperature could see 47 per cent of insect species, 26 per cent of vertebrate and 16 per cent of plant species lose at least half of their geographic ranges, an expert on global change has said.
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Cleanliness the best way to promote hygiene and disease prevention, also creates a sense of social well-being and good mental health: Vice President 17.5.2018 Govt of india: PIB
The Vice President of India, Shri M. Venkaiah Naidu has said that cleanliness ensures hygiene and disease prevention and it also creates a sense of social well-being and good mental health. He was addressing the gathering after releasing two books - ‘A Treatise on Cleanliness’ and ‘Waste Management, an Introduction’, authored by Shri Rajat Bhargava, here today.
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Britain's strategy to meet climate change targets not sufficient: lawmakers 16.5.2018 General News
LONDON (Reuters) - The British government's Clean Growth Strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions will not be enough to meet legally binding climate change targets, a committee of cross-party lawmakers said on Wednesday.
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Britain's strategy to meet climate change targets not sufficient, say lawmakers 16.5.2018 DNA: Money
The British government's Clean Growth Strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions will not be enough to meet legally binding climate change targets, a committee of cross-party lawmakers said on Wednesday. The strategy, launched last year, outlines investment in research and innovation to help reduce emissions which lead to global warming. Britain has committed to cut emissions by 80 percent by 2050 compared to 1990 levels and must produce proposals on how to reach its climate targets as part of carbon budgets set every five years. Although the amount of electricity generated from low-carbon energy doubled to a record 50 percent last year from 2009, there are signs that investment might have stalled in the past two years, the Environmental Audit Committee said in a report. Annual clean energy investment in Britain is now at its lowest level since 2008, threatening the country's ability to meet its carbon budgets from 2023. The report also said that changes to low-carbon energy policies in 2015 has ...
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