User: subbu Topic: Climate Change
Category: Emissions
1 new since May 25 2016 23:45 IST RSS 2.0
 
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False solutions to climate change 9.5.2016 Deccan Herald - Supplements
Not sustainable Biofuels are not fulfilling their objective in the climate negotiations to reduce emissions, and are not a solution to address the climate crisis, avers CENSAT Agua Viva Reducing emissions of greenhouse gases has been widely publicised as the formula for alleviating the global climate crisis. However, after 20 years of negotiations in the United Nations framework, the emission of pollutants continues to increase, the extraction of fossil fuels grows at a frenetic pace, mainly in the Global South, while energy consumption in the Global North is not questioned. What has been achieved with the climate negotiations is the promotion of false solutions. Among the false solutions to 'confront' the environmental crisis is biofuels, which are promoted globally under the arguments that they are a 'sustainable' way to face the crisis and fuel shortages, permit the reduction of greenhouse gases and also an opportunity for development for rural communities around the world, mainly for tropical ...
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Putting CO2 back to work 9.5.2016 Deccan Herald - Supplements
Scientists are working on ways to convert carbon dioxide into a renewable, recyclable resource, writes Henry Fountain. Think, for a moment, of carbon dioxide (CO2) as garbage, a waste product from burning fossil fuels. Like other garbage, almost all of that CO2 is thrown away — into the atmosphere, where it contributes to climate change. A small amount is captured and stored underground to keep it out of the air. But increasingly, scientists are asking, rather than throwing away or storing carbon dioxide, how about recycling some of it? At laboratories around the world, researchers are working on ways to do just that. The X Prize Foundation has created an incentive, a $20 million prize for teams that by 2020 come up with technologies to turn carbon dioxide captured from smokestacks of coal- or gas-fired power plants into useful products. The challenge ahead But perhaps the ultimate goal of researchers in this field is to turn the waste product of fuel-burning into new fuel. In theory, if this could ...
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Opec bids adieu to Saudi Arabia oil supremo 9.5.2016 News
Saudi Arabian Oil Minister Ali al-Naimi, the architect of the 2014 switch in Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (Opec) policy that's since roiled the energy market, companies and entire economies from Mexico to Nigeria, is leaving his ...
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Anohni: Hopelessness review – a radical album for a time of crisis 8.5.2016 The Guardian -- Front Page

(Rough Trade)

This extraordinary album, authored by the artist formerly known as Antony and the Johnsons, is all about radical changes, and radical change.

Having excised the letter T, Antony is now Anohni, bringing both brand and public face in line with Anohni’s long-held female identification among intimates. Gone are the Johnsons, the non-ensemble who used to underscore Antony’s emotive vibrato. Two digital producers at the vanguard of electronica replace them – Hudson Mohawke and Oneohtrix Point Never.

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Shift Towards Cleaner, Greener Technology, One Brick Kiln at a Time 8.5.2016 newindianexpress.com
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Philippines investigates Shell and Exxon over climate change 7.5.2016 Guardian: Environment

A legal case will consider if the emissions of 50 fossil fuel companies violate the human rights of those hit by extreme weather

Can Chevron, ExxonMobil and BP be held accountable for the vulnerable communities most affected by climate change? It’s a question a legal case in the Philippines could answer.

Last month, lawyers for the petitioners met with the Commission on Human Rights of the Philippines (CHR), a constitutional body tasked with investigating human rights violations. Their goal was to identify expert witnesses for a hearing into the liability of 50 of the biggest fossil fuel companies for violating the human rights of Filipinos as a result of catastrophic climate change.

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What can we do about it? 6.5.2016 The Hindu: Today's Paper
What can we do about it?
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Greg Hunt argues there's no definite link between coal and climate change 6.5.2016 Guardian: Environment

Australian environment minister denies he failed to consider impact of coal on Great Barrier Reef in court documents

The federal environment minister has argued in court that coal from Australia’s largest coalmine would have no “substantial” impact on climate change and as a result he did not need to consider whether it would affect the Great Barrier Reef.

The Australian Conservation Foundation challenged Greg Hunt’s approval of Adani’s Carmichael mine, alleging he failed to consider the impacts the burning of the coal from the mine would have on climate change and hence on the Great Barrier Reef.

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Plans for coal-fired power in Asia are 'disaster for planet' warns World Bank 5.5.2016 Guardian: Environment

Experts have offered stark warnings that proposed power plants in India, China, Vietnam and Indonesia would blow Paris climate deal if they move ahead

Plans to build more coal-fired power plants in Asia would be a “disaster for the planet” and overwhelm the deal forged at Paris to fight climate change, the president of the World Bank said on Thursday.

In an unusually stark warning, the World Bank president, Jim Yong Kim, noted that countries in south and south-east Asia were on track to build hundreds more coal-fired power plants in the next 20 years – despite promises made at Paris to cut greenhouse gas emissions and pivot to a clean energy future.

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ExxonMobil launches venture for low-cost carbon capture 5.5.2016 TOI: All Headlines
ExxonMobil launches venture for low-cost carbon capture
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We've been mayors of New York, Paris and Rio. We know climate action starts with cities 5.5.2016 Guardian: Environment

If we want to reduce emissions, cities are key. But they need to be empowered if they are to have an impact

The Paris Climate Agreement, already signed by more than 175 countries, was successful in large part because national governments recognized cities’ progress in reducing carbon emissions. On Thursday, as world leaders gather in Washington DC to discuss how to reach the goals set in Paris, they should focus on helping cities do even more, and act faster, to reduce those emissions.

Cities account for most of the world’s carbon emissions, and their share will continue to increase as cities increase in size. Today more than half of the world lives in cities, and by 2050, two-thirds will. Every day, the world’s cities grow by about 60 square kilometers – an area equal to New York City’s borough of Manhattan.

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Tory MPs tell Cameron to accept steep cuts needed for UK's fifth carbon budget 5.5.2016 Guardian: Environment

Climate change is a problem that cannot wait, 20 backbenchers say in their statement to PM, urging him to accept cuts in greenhouse gas emissions

Twenty Conservative MPs have written to the prime minister urging him to accept the steep cuts in greenhouse gas emissions required by the UK’s ‘fifth carbon budget’.

On the eve of local elections in several regions, and the poll for the next London mayor, the MPs have made a strong statement that climate change is a problem that cannot wait.

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India's answer to global warming: Cows that belch less 4.5.2016 TOI: India
India's 280 million cows and 200 million more ruminant animals send 13 million tons of methane into the atmosphere every year. And thus, government scientists are working hard to reduce carbon emissions by making cows less flatulent.
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How are rising carbon dioxide levels affecting crops? NASA finds out! 4.5.2016 Zee News : Science and Technology
US space agency NASA is among those contributing toward this by carrying out studies in order to create awareness regarding these threats.
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NASA Study: Rising carbon dioxide levels will help and hurt crops 4.5.2016 New Kerala: World News
California, May 4 : Elevated carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere may increase water-use efficiency in crops and considerably mitigate yield losses due to climate change, according to a new NASA study.
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Higher coal use could impact rainfall 4.5.2016 The Hindu: Today's Paper
Higher coal use could impact rainfall
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A long and hot summer ahead 4.5.2016 The Hindu: Today's Paper
A long and hot summer ahead
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Pre-2020 action of developed nations is essential to limit the global average temperature rise, says French envoy for climate change negotiations 3.5.2016 TOI: All Headlines
Pre-2020 action of developed nations is essential to limit the global average temperature rise, says French envoy for climate change negotiations
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Why today’s global warming has roots in Indonesia’s genocidal past | Joshua Oppenheimer 3.5.2016 The Guardian -- World Latest
The mass killings in 1965 live on in global emissions from forced forest fires – and through human rights abuses in the palm oil fields There has been tremendous concern over the ways climate change will affect human rights, but little attention to how human rights abuse affects our global climate. Fifty years ago, Indonesia went through a genocide. The massacres may be relatively unknown, but in a terrible way the destruction continues, and threatens us all. In 1965, the Indonesian army organised paramilitary death squads and exterminated between 500,000 and 1 million people who had hastily been identified as enemies of General Suharto’s new military dictatorship. Today, the killers and their protégés are comfortable establishment figures whose impunity, political power and capacity for intimidation ...
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Phasing out coal, oil and gas extraction in US would drastically cut emissions 3.5.2016 Guardian: Environment

The reduction would slash greenhouse gas emissions by 100m tonnes a year by 2030 and even more after that, comparing well to other proposed measures

Phasing out coal, oil and gas extraction on US federal land would cut greenhouse gas emissions by 100m tonnes a year by 2030 and even more after then, providing a useful brake to careening climate change, according to a new study.

A quarter of all fossil fuel extraction in the US occurs on the 650m acres of land under federal management. The outer shelf of the US’ marine territory, used for oil and gas drilling, is also under federal control.

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