User: subbu Topic: Climate Change
Category: Emissions
Last updated: Aug 07 2018 15:53 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Earth heading towards irreversible 'hothouse' state, finds new study 7.8.2018 DNA: Opinion
Our planet is at the risk of entering an irreversible 'hothouse' condition - where the global temperatures will rise by four to five degrees and sea levels may surge by up to 60 metres higher than today - even if targets under the Paris climate deal are met, a study warns. According to the researchers, keeping global warming to within 1.5-2 degrees Celsius may be more difficult than previously assessed. "Human emissions of greenhouse gas are not the sole determinant of temperature on Earth," said Will Steffen from the Australian National University. "Our study suggests that human-induced global warming of two degrees Celsius may trigger other Earth system processes, often called "feedbacks," that can drive further warming - even if we stop emitting greenhouse gases," said Steffen, lead author of the study published in the journal PNAS. "Avoiding this scenario requires a redirection of human actions from exploitation to stewardship of the Earth system," he said. A team of scientists showed that even if ...
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Decrease in Greenhouse Gas Emissions 3.8.2018 Govt of india: PIB
Emphasising that India's emission intensity of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) has reduced by 12% between 2005 and 2010 (as per India’s first BUR) in line with our voluntary goal of reducing emission intensity of GDP by 20-25% by 2020 over 2005 level, Minister of State for Environment, Forest and Climate Change, Dr. Mahesh Sharma has said that the greenhouse gases (GHG) emission inventory for the country is prepared according to the requirements under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).
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Greenhouse gases surge to new highs worldwide in 2017: US report 1.8.2018 DNA: India
Planet-warming greenhouse gases surged to new highs as abnormally hot temperatures swept the globe and ice melted at record levels in the Arctic last year due to climate change, a major US report said today. The annual State of the Climate Report, compiled by more than 450 scientists from over 60 countries, describes worsening climate conditions worldwide in 2017, the same year that US President Donald Trump pulled out of the landmark Paris climate deal. The United States is the world's second leading polluter after China, but has rolled back environmental safeguards under Trump, who has declared climate change a "Chinese hoax" and exited the Paris deal signed by more than 190 nations as a path toward curbing harmful emissions. The 300-page report issued by the American Meteorological Society and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration mentioned the word "abnormal" a dozen times, referring to storms, droughts, scorching temperatures and record low ice cover in the Arctic. Last year, the top ...
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Energy-intensive Bitcoin transactions pose environmental threat 1.8.2018 Zee News : Science and Technology
Bitcoin and similar blockchain technologies consume more electricity than entire nations may prevent the world from achieving the climate change mitigation targets under the Paris Agreement, a study has warned.
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Airlines go green as concern for environment takes off 18.7.2018 Rediff: Business
From using bio-fuels to revamping in-flight food and drinks services, eschewing mass-produced chicken/eggs in favour of local, farm-raised options to offering eco-friendly toys for children, airlines try out inventive measures to encourage carbon-neutral practices.
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China, EU reaffirm Paris climate commitment, vow more cooperation 16.7.2018 DNA: Money
China and the European Union on Monday reaffirmed their commitment to the Paris climate change pact and called other signatories to do the same, saying action against rising global temperatures had become more important than ever. Following President Donald Trump's decision last year to withdraw the United States from the agreement, China and the European Union have emerged as the biggest champions of the 2015 accord, which aims to keep global temperature increases to "well below" 2 degrees Celsius. In a joint communique on Monday, the two sides stopped short of criticising the United States, but said the deal proved that "multilateralism can succeed in building fair and effective solutions to the most critical global problems of our time." The two sides said they remained committed to creating a mechanism to transfer $100 billion a year from richer to poorer nations to help them adapt to climate change. The fund has been a major bone of contention for the United States. They also promised to work ...
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Dr. Harsh Vardhan Inaugurates 16th Workshop On Greenhouse Gas Inventories in Asia 11.7.2018 Govt of india: PIB
Applauding the long-standing effort in creating a network of Asian countries on GHG inventory by Government of Japan, Union Minister of Environment, Forest & Climate Change, Dr. Harsh Vardhan has said that for India, action on climate change is a moral and ethical responsibility and India is working under the dynamic leadership of the Prime Minister, Shri Narendra Modi, to achieve its obligations as per Common but Differentiated Responsibilities (CBDR) principles.
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Earth may get twice as hot as predicted 10.7.2018 DNA: Mumbai
The Earth may end up being twice as warm as projected by climate models, even if the world meets the target of limiting global warming to under two degrees Celsius, a study has found. The study, published in the journal Nature Geoscience, showed that sea levels may rise six metres or more even if Paris climate goals are met. The findings are based on observational evidence from three warm periods over the past 3.5 million years when the world was 0.5-2 degree Celsius warmer than the pre-industrial temperatures of the 19th Century. The research also revealed how large areas of the polar ice caps could collapse and significant changes to ecosystems could see the Sahara Desert become green and the edges of tropical forests turn into fire dominated savanna. "Observations of past warming periods suggest that a number of amplifying mechanisms, which are poorly represented in climate models, increase long-term warming beyond  climate model projections," said Hubertus Fischer from the University of Bern in ...
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Making India carbon-neutral 22.6.2018 Hindu: Religion
We must invest in mass public transport, sustainable constructions, and massive green cover, says Nidhi Adlakha
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Heat, dust and floods: What’s up with Bengaluru? 7.6.2018 Citizen Matters, Bengaluru
Loss of green cover in Bengaluru is a visible one. Has it impacted the lives in the city? If yes, how? What do experts say? First part of the series on vegetation in Bengaluru. »
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Fly less and eat healthy to cut warming 5.6.2018 Hindu: National
Global warming can be limited to 1.5 degrees Celsius by improving the energy efficiency of our everyday activities such as travel, indoor heating and
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FICCI joins hands with PPMC to chart road map for sustainable mobility in India 31.5.2018 General News
India's industry body FICCI and Paris Process on Mobility and Climate (PPMC) have joined hands to chart a future road map for sustainable mobility in the country by adapting ongoing global efforts to local needs. A collaborative agreement has been signed between FICCI and PPMC -- an open platform created to serve as a facilitator for the transport sector in the COP 21 Lima Paris action agenda -- at the MovinOn by Michelin event here. PPMC co-founder Patrick Oliva said there are ongoing efforts on how to get zero emissions from the transport sector considering how all pervasive it is across the globe. "Already there are programmes running in Europe and countries like Morocco. Now we can launch something in India based on the learnings from these," he added. The objective of the Indian road map will be to engage sustainable mobility community following a bottom up approach to contribute towards the implementation of 2030 global agenda on sustainable development and Paris Agreement on ..
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'Global warming likely to hit poorest regions hardest' 31.5.2018 General News
The poorest regions of the world are will bear the worst brunt of climate change if global average surface temperatures reach the 1.5 or 2 degree Celsius limit set by the Paris agreement, a study has found. The wealthiest areas of the world will experience fewer changes, researchers said. The study, published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, compares the difference between climate change impacts for wealthy and poor nations. "The results are a stark example of the inequalities that come with global warming," said Andrew King, from the University of Melbourne in Australia. "The richest countries that produced the most emissions are the least affected by heat when average temperatures climb to just 2 degrees Celsius, while poorer nations bear the brunt of changing local climates and the consequences that come with them," said King. The least affected countries include most temperate nations, with the UK coming out ahead of all others. By contrast, the worst affected are in .
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Nepal leads the way in cutting emissions in brick kilns 30.5.2018 Hindu: Gadgets
Redesigned ovens, zig-zag stacking of bricks reduces pollution
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China floods to hit US economy: climate effects through trade chains 29.5.2018 Sify Finance
Intensifying river floods could lead to regional production losses worldwide caused by global warming. This might not only hamper local economies around the globe - the effects might also
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China floods to hit US economy: climate effects through trade chains 29.5.2018 General News
Intensifying river floods could lead to regional production losses worldwide caused by global warming. This might not only hamper local economies around the globe - the effects might also propagate through the global network of trade and supply chains, a study now published in Nature Climate Change shows.It is the first to assess this effect for flooding on a global scale, using a newly developed dynamic economic model. It finds that economic flood damages in China, which could, without further adaption, increase by 80 percent within the next 20 years, might also affect European Union (EU) and United States industries.The US economy might be specifically vulnerable due to its unbalanced trade relation with China.Contrary to US president Trump's current tariff sanctions, the study suggests that building stronger and thus more balanced trade relations might be a useful strategy to mitigate economic losses caused by intensifying weather extremes."Climate change will increase flood risks .
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All nations including US will ratify 2016 climate deal: UNEP 27.5.2018 General News
All nations including the US and India will certainly ratify a key 2016 climate deal, hugely important for fighting climate change, UN Environment Chief Erik Solheim said. About 200 nations, including India, the US and China, had struck a legally-binding deal in the Rwandan capital Kigali in 2016 after intense negotiations to phase down climate-damaging refrigerant gas hydrofluorocarbons known as HFCs that have global warming potential thousand times more than carbon dioxide. The deal, formally known as the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol, is now open for ratification and 35 nations have ratified it so far. "The Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol will for sure be ratified by all nations," Solheim told PTI in an interview here. The statement of the Executive Director of the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) came amid concerns over the actions of the Donald Trump administration. The Trump administration had pulled out of the key Paris Climate Change ...
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Families from 8 countries sue EU over climate change: lawyers 24.5.2018 General News
Ten families from Europe, Kenya, and Fiji have filed suit against the European Union over global warming threats to their homes and livelihoods, their lawyers said today. The 30-odd plaintiffs before the European Court of Justice in Luxembourg insist the bloc must do more to limit climate change caused by greenhouse gas emissions, and point to drought, glacier melt, sea level rise and flooding that will worsen as temperatures rise.
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Families from 8 countries sue EU over climate change 24.5.2018 General News
Ten families from Europe, Kenya, and Fiji have filed suit against the European Union over global warming threats to their homes and livelihoods, their lawyers said today. They insist the bloc must do more to limit climate change caused by greenhouse gas emissions, and point to drought, glacier melt, sea level rise and flooding that will worsen as temperatures rise. The plaintiffs before the European Court of Justice are "families living near the coast, families owning forests in Portugal, families in the mountains that see the glaciers melting, families in the north that are affected by permafrost melting," their lawer Roda Verheyen told AFP. They "are already being impacted by climate change, already incurring damage... and they are saying: 'EU, you have to do what you can to protect us because otherwise our damage will be catastrophical'," Verheyen said. The claim, nicknamed the "People's Climate Case", is the first of its kind brought against the EU, the group's lawyers ...
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Earth may become 4 degrees warmer by 2084: Study 24.5.2018 General News
The Earth's average temperature may increase by four degrees Celsius, compared to pre-industrial levels, before the end of 21st century, a study claims. This increase translates to more annual and seasonal warming over land than over the ocean, with significant warming in the Arctic, researchers said. "A great many record-breaking heat events, heavy floods, and extreme droughts would occur if global warming crosses the four degrees celsius level, with respect to the preindustrial period," said Dabang Jiang, a senior researcher at the Chinese Academy of Sciences. "The temperature increase would cause severe threats to ecosystems, human systems, and associated societies and economies," Jiang said. In the study published in the journal Advances in Atmospheric Sciences, researchers used the parameters of scenario in which there was no mitigation of rising greenhouse gas emissions. They compared 39 coordinated climate model experiments from the fifth phase of the Coupled Model ...
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