User: subbu Topic: Climate Change
Category: Global warming
Last updated: Aug 20 2018 12:03 IST RSS 2.0
 
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World's largest 3D-printed reef installed in Maldives to help save corals 20.8.2018 DNA: India
Could 3D printing save the planet's coral reefs? That's the theory behind an experimental project in the Maldives which aims to help coral reefs survive the ravages of climate change and warming waters.  Developed using computer modeling and a 3D printer at a lab in Melbourne, Australia, the artificial reef was designed to resemble reef structures typically found in the Maldives.  Printing the 3D molds took 24 hours. They were then cast in ceramic, an inert material similar to the calcium carbonate found in coral reefs, explains industrial designer Alex Goad of Reef Design Lab.  The molds were shipped to the Maldives, filled with concrete, assembled on-site at Summer Island and then submerged seven meters below the surface.  Live coral was then transplanted within the artificial reef, where it's hoped that within two to three years, it will grow and colonize the structure. With global warming, bleaching and environmental pollution, it's hoped that 3D printing technology can offer a new way of saving the ...
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What caused the rain havoc in Kerala 15.8.2018 Rediff: News
'A lot of unauthorised encroachments have taken place in our forest area.'
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Scientists say there may be hope for marine reefs to survive modern-day global warming 14.8.2018 DNA: Popular News
There may be hope for marine reefs to survive modern-day global warming, say scientists who have found that coral-algal partnerships have endured numerous climate change events since the age of dinosaurs. The relationship between corals and the mutualistic micro-algae that enable them to build reefs is considerably older and more diverse than previously assumed, according to a study published in the journal Current Biology. "Past estimates placed the initiation of these symbiotic relationships at 50 to 65 million years ago," said Todd LaJeunesse, an associate professor at Pennsylvania State University in the US. "Our research indicates that modern corals and their algal partners have been entwined with each other for much longer - since the time of the dinosaurs, approximately 160 million years ago," said LaJeunesse. "During their long existence, they have faced severe episodes of environmental change, but have managed to bounce back after each one," he said. The micro-algae, commonly called ...
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AI's next terrority to annex: picking vegetables 9.8.2018 Sify Finance
[United States], August 9 (ANI): Artificial intelligence will soon be powering robots that will essentially replace farmers to pick vegetables. Thanks to the global warming, the increasing demand
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Artificial intelligence will soon power robots; may replace farmers to pick vegetables 9.8.2018 DNA: Mumbai
Artificial intelligence will soon be powering robots that will essentially replace farmers to pick vegetables. Thanks to the global warming, the increasing demand in agriculture, and the lack of ample land for farming, robotics is the solution seem by many to meet the demand of the exploding global population. An American startup, Root AI, is working towards the direction of making indoor farming the next big thing in agriculture where robots, and not humans, help produce and harvest the crop with maximum optimisation of resources. One of the first inventions coming from Root AI is a mobile robot for indoor farming facilities. Using the cameras and sensors on it, the robot is capable of picking tomatoes the right way and assess the health of the crops, conduct operations such as pruning vines, observing and controlling ripening to cultivate crops, TechCrunch reported. Root AI is expected to begin the pilot tests from 2019. Given that the US, and other parts of the world, are facing a labour shortage in ...
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Earth heading towards irreversible 'hothouse' state, finds new study 7.8.2018 DNA: Opinion
Our planet is at the risk of entering an irreversible 'hothouse' condition - where the global temperatures will rise by four to five degrees and sea levels may surge by up to 60 metres higher than today - even if targets under the Paris climate deal are met, a study warns. According to the researchers, keeping global warming to within 1.5-2 degrees Celsius may be more difficult than previously assessed. "Human emissions of greenhouse gas are not the sole determinant of temperature on Earth," said Will Steffen from the Australian National University. "Our study suggests that human-induced global warming of two degrees Celsius may trigger other Earth system processes, often called "feedbacks," that can drive further warming - even if we stop emitting greenhouse gases," said Steffen, lead author of the study published in the journal PNAS. "Avoiding this scenario requires a redirection of human actions from exploitation to stewardship of the Earth system," he said. A team of scientists showed that even if ...
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Scientists should come up with path-breaking innovations: Vice President 5.8.2018 Govt of india: PIB
The Vice President of India, Shri M. Venkaiah Naidu has said that scientific institutions to nurture talent and foster path-breaking innovations to transform the socio-economic landscape of the country.
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Environment & Skill Development Ministries Sign MoU to train one lakh RAC Service Technicians 2.8.2018 Govt of india: PIB
Emphasising that India is being globally lauded for its green initiatives and commitment to environment and climate change, Union Minister for Environment, Forest and Climate Change, Dr. Harsh Vardhan today said that Skill India is an endeavour by the Government to act as a catalyst in bringing about a change by skilling, up-skilling and re-skilling technicians to bring down the emission of harmful greenhouse gases.
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PNCM conducts tree plantation campaign 27.7.2018 Manipur: E-Pao
PNCM conducts tree plantation campaign
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Forests are our treasure, preserve and protect them: Vice President 24.7.2018 Govt of india: PIB
The Vice President of India, Shri M. Venkaiah Naidu has said that a mega Bio-Diverse Country like India should preserve and protect its forest cover and pass the treasure to next generation duly protecting and developing it. He was interacting with the Indian Forest Service (IFS) Probationers (2017-19), here today.
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Environmental protection is a key concern for 21st century, says President 23.7.2018 Central Chronicle
New Delhi, Environmental protection had become a key concern for the 21st century and forests were an integral part of the solution, President Ram Nath Kovind said here on Monday. Addressing the probationers of the Indian Forest Service (2017 batch) who called on him at the Rashtrapati Bhawan here, Mr Kovind said that over the past […]
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Probationers of the Indian Forest Service Call on the President 23.7.2018 Govt of india: PIB
A group of probationers of the Indian Forest Service (2017 batch) called on the President of India, Shri Ram Nath Kovind, today (July 23, 2018) at Rashtrapati Bhavan. Addressing the probationers, the President said that over the past few decades, the world has realised the existential threats posed by environmental degradation, depletion in forest cover, and above all global warming leading to climate change.
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Students must visit rural areas to know people’s problems: Vice President 14.7.2018 Govt of india: PIB
The Vice President of India, Shri M. Venkaiah Naidu has asked educational institutions to encourage students to visit rural areas to have a firsthand understanding of the problems faced by people living in villages and said that understanding the rural India will enable them to come out with innovative solutions to the problems faced by people.
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'Rainfall is one of the hardest things to predict' 11.7.2018 Rediff: Interviews
'Temperature and wind can be predicted more easily than rainfall.'
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Earth may get twice as hot as predicted 10.7.2018 DNA: Mumbai
The Earth may end up being twice as warm as projected by climate models, even if the world meets the target of limiting global warming to under two degrees Celsius, a study has found. The study, published in the journal Nature Geoscience, showed that sea levels may rise six metres or more even if Paris climate goals are met. The findings are based on observational evidence from three warm periods over the past 3.5 million years when the world was 0.5-2 degree Celsius warmer than the pre-industrial temperatures of the 19th Century. The research also revealed how large areas of the polar ice caps could collapse and significant changes to ecosystems could see the Sahara Desert become green and the edges of tropical forests turn into fire dominated savanna. "Observations of past warming periods suggest that a number of amplifying mechanisms, which are poorly represented in climate models, increase long-term warming beyond  climate model projections," said Hubertus Fischer from the University of Bern in ...
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Khuga Bn celebrates Van Mahotsav 5.7.2018 Manipur: E-Pao
Khuga Bn celebrates Van Mahotsav
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The world's first animals caused global warming, claims new study 2.7.2018 DNA: India
The evolution of the Earth's first animals more than 500 million years ago caused global warming, according to a study. The research, published in the journal Nature Communications, found that 520-540 million years ago, animal life evolved in the ocean and began breaking down organic material on the seafloor, leading to more carbon dioxide and less oxygen in the atmosphere. In the 100 million years that followed, conditions for these earliest animals became much harsher, as ocean oxygen levels fell and carbon dioxide caused global warming, researchers said. "Like worms in a garden, tiny creatures on the seabed disturb, mix and recycle dead organic material - a process known as bioturbation," said Tim Lenton, a professor at the University of Exeter in the UK. "Because the effect of animals burrowing is so big, you would expect to see big changes in the environment when the whole ocean floor changes from an undisturbed state to a bioturbated state," said Lenton. "We did indeed see a decrease in oxygen ...
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U.S. lakes see rise in algal blooms 23.6.2018 Hindu: Fitness
The words blasted to cellphones around Oregon’s capital city were ominous- “Civil emergency . prepare for action.” Within half an hour, a second offi
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Global warming cooks up ‘a different world’ over three decades 18.6.2018 Hindu: Energy & Environment
Earth is noticeably hotter, the weather stormier and more extreme.
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Mount Everest, the high-altitude rubbish dump 17.6.2018 Hindu: Internet
Environmentalists are concerned that the pollution on Everest is also affecting water sources down in the valley.
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