User: subbu Topic: Climate Change
Category: Impacts :: Ecosystems
Last updated: May 26 2018 19:18 IST RSS 2.0
 
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AR distributes more than 1 lakh saplings to 31 villages 26.5.2018 Manipur: E-Pao
AR distributes more than 1 lakh saplings to 31 villages
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One lakh plants distributed for income generation through afforestation 26.5.2018 Manipur: E-Pao
One lakh plants distributed for income generation through afforestation
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Earth may become 4 degrees warmer by 2084: Study 24.5.2018 General News
The Earth's average temperature may increase by four degrees Celsius, compared to pre-industrial levels, before the end of 21st century, a study claims. This increase translates to more annual and seasonal warming over land than over the ocean, with significant warming in the Arctic, researchers said. "A great many record-breaking heat events, heavy floods, and extreme droughts would occur if global warming crosses the four degrees celsius level, with respect to the preindustrial period," said Dabang Jiang, a senior researcher at the Chinese Academy of Sciences. "The temperature increase would cause severe threats to ecosystems, human systems, and associated societies and economies," Jiang said. In the study published in the journal Advances in Atmospheric Sciences, researchers used the parameters of scenario in which there was no mitigation of rising greenhouse gas emissions. They compared 39 coordinated climate model experiments from the fifth phase of the Coupled Model ...
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Habitat loss may have triggered Nipah outbreak 23.5.2018 Hindu: Thiruvananthapuram
Human threats could be exacerbating transmission of bat-related viral infections
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UAE marks International Day for Biological Diversity 22.5.2018 General News
Dubai, May 22 (IANS/WAM) The United Arab Emirates (UAE) joined the world in celebrating World Biodiversity Day on Tuesday.
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Bat habitat loss and Nipah 22.5.2018 Hindu: Rx
Human threats could be exacerbating transmission of the disease
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International Biodiversity Day 2018: tracking new species discovered in India 22.5.2018 Hindu: Health
From the Bhupathi frog to the Kalam plant, here is a list of new species discovered in India during 2017-18.
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Decoded: Impact of climate change on river ecosystems 22.5.2018 DNA: Wide Angle
According to a recent study, climate change can impact fragile river ecosystems all over the world. Research undertaken in South Africa's Kruger National Park (KNP) has shown that increasing frequency of cyclone-driven extreme floods is responsible for destroying some of the world's most sensitive and valuable riverine habitats. Researchers from the universities of Hull, Aberystwyth, and Salford and the engineering consultants "Architecture, Engineering, Consulting, Operations, and Maintenance" (AECOM), used laser survey technology (LiDAR) flown from an aircraft, to measure the impacts of cyclone-driven extreme floods in 2000 and 2012 on rivers in KNP. KNP game reserve has global significance for its habitats and associated species, and the rivers flowing through the park provide essential ecosystem services, including water and habitat in the shape of the many varied channel morphologies and associated riparian forest. The high-resolution data has been used to create accurate digital models of the river ...
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Limiting warming to 1.5 degrees C can save world's species 21.5.2018 General News
Limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius could save the vast majority of the world's plant and animal species from climate change, a study has found. The study, published in the journal Science, shows that limiting warming to the ultimate goal of the Paris Agreement would avoid half the risks associated with warming of two degrees Celsius for plants and animals, and two thirds of the risks for insects. Species across the globe would benefit, but particularly those in Southern Africa, the Amazon, Europe and Australia, according researchers from the University of East Anglia in the UK. Reducing the risk to insects is particularly important, the team say, because they are so vital for 'ecosystem services' such as pollinating crops and flowers, and being part of the food chain for other birds and animals. Previous research focused on quantifying the benefits of limiting warming to two degrees Celsius above pre-industrial times - the upper limit for temperature as set out in the ...
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Scientific research has three-fold objective, President tells IISER graduates 20.5.2018 General News
Scientific research has three major objectives which should serve as a guiding light, President Ram Nath Kovind told graduating students of Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER) at their seventh convocation here on Sunday.
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Expert warns of irrevocable biodiversity damage with rising temperature 20.5.2018 All News-IANS Stories
A 3.2 degree Celsius increase in the Earth's temperature could see 47 per cent of insect species, 26 per cent of vertebrate and 16 per cent of plant species lose at least half of their geographic ranges, an expert on global change has said.
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Vice President calls for increased investments in agriculture 19.5.2018 Govt of india: PIB
The Vice President of India, Shri M. Venkaiah Naidu has suggested to the Central and various State Governments to increase investments in agriculture and allied sectors to make farming viable and attractive.
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Only 1 pct of Japan's biggest coral reef healthy: survey 18.5.2018 General News
Japan's biggest coral reef has not recovered from bleaching due to rising sea temperatures, with only one per cent of the reef in a healthy condition, according to a government study. The overall volume of coral in Sekisei Lagoon in southwestern Japan near Okinawa had already plunged by 80 per cent since the late 1980s due to rising water temperatures and damage caused by coral-eating starfish. Now only 1.4 per cent of the lagoon, which stretches over 67.89 square kilometres, is in a healthy condition, the environment ministry said, after it was hit by mass bleaching in 1998, 2001, 2007 and most recently 2016. "If coral reefs don't recover, it means a loss of rich fauna for a variety of creatures and would have grave impact on the ecosystem in the region," ministry official Chihiro Kondo told AFP today. For the first time since 2008, the ministry analysed satellite photos and information from some 1,000 monitoring sites for the Sekisei Lagoon and two other reefs around the Ishigaki ...
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Impact of climate change on river ecosystems 17.5.2018 General News
According to a recent study, climate change can impact fragile river ecosystems all over the world.Research undertaken in South Africa's Kruger National Park (KNP) has shown that increasing frequency of cyclone-driven extreme floods is responsible for destroying some of the world's most sensitive and valuable riverine habitats.Researchers from the universities of Hull, Aberystwyth, and Salford and the engineering consultants "Architecture, Engineering, Consulting, Operations, and Maintenance" (AECOM), used laser survey technology (LiDAR) flown from an aircraft, to measure the impacts of cyclone-driven extreme floods in 2000 and 2012 on rivers in KNP.KNP game reserve has global significance for its habitats and associated species, and the rivers flowing through the park provide essential ecosystem services, including water and habitat in the shape of the many varied channel morphologies and associated riparian forest.The high-resolution data has been used to create accurate digital ...
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Excess of lovemaking puts Marsupials at risk 15.5.2018 Hindu: S & T
Species in Australia may face extintion
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In Madagascar, fishermen plant mangroves for the future 13.5.2018 General News
Hunched over the soil, Malagasy villagers work feverishly -- deft fingers planting stalks of mangrove to replace the swathes destroyed for firewood and building material. In just two decades, Madagascar lost about a fifth of its mangrove forest area, exposing its coastline to the ocean's ravages and shrinking the nursery grounds of crabs and shrimp -- two key exports. With sea levels forecast to rise further due to global warming, coastal villagers are rushing to try and undo the damage, with the help of conservation group WWF. "The ocean keeps rising and rising, and it takes everything with it," lamented 36-year-old crab fisherman Clement Joseph Rabenandrasana, who travelled several kilometres from his home in Beanjavilo to Amboanio on the island's west coast to volunteer in a two-day reforestation drive. Amboanio is a hamlet of about 50 people in the Melaky region, heavily dependent on aquaculture. "The mangrove protects us," said Rabenandrasana, while conceding that: "I used to ...
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Multiple threats to Himalayan biodiversity 12.5.2018 Hindu: Rx
Home to 30% of India’s fauna, the region hosts several endangered species
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Marine protected areas can help save coral reefs: Study 10.5.2018 General News
Marine protected areas (MPAs) may be effective in saving coral reefs from the damaging effects of global climate change, according to a study which contradicts the notion that such efforts are futile. The study by researchers at the University of Maine in the US spanned 700 kilometers of the eastern Caribbean, discovering that local reef protection efforts can work. According to the findings, published in the journal Science Advances, local fisheries management resulted in a 62 per cent increase in the density of young corals, which improves the ecosystem's ability to recover from major impacts like hurricanes and coral bleaching. "MPAs can help coral reefs, but studies to the contrary just were not measuring the right things at the right scales," said Robert Steneck, a professor at the University of Maine. "The idea behind MPAs is that, by reducing fishing pressure, you increase the number of seaweed-eating fish, and they decrease the amount of harmful seaweed, which makes it easier .
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Indian Museum offers feast to fans of natural history 10.5.2018 Hindu: Bangalore
Renovated galleries showcase mammal, invertebrate and botanical specimens
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Environment Minister Harsh Vardhan inaugurates four galleries at Indian Museum 9.5.2018 Hindu: Home
Union Minister for Environment, Forest and Climate Change Harsh Vardhan on Wednesday inaugurated four galleries at the Indian Museum — three with zoo
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