User: servelots Topic: iihs_feeds_v2
Category: All-Channels :: Climate
Last updated: Nov 16 2019 13:45 IST RSS 2.0
 
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St Mark's square in Venice closed after floods 16.11.2019
Another exceptional high tide swamped flood-hit Venice on Friday, prompting the mayor to order St Mark's square closed after Italy declared a state of emergency for the UNESCO city. Mayor Luigi Brugnaro moved to shut the iconic square as the latest sea surge struck with strong storms and winds battering the region. It reached a high of 1.54 metres (five feet) just before midday, lower than Tuesday's peak but still dangerous. "I'm forced to close the square to avoid health risks for citizens... a disaster," Brugnaro said. In the afternoon the square reopened as water levels receded and forecasts anticipated lower levels in coming days. Churches, shops and homes in the city of canals have been inundated by unusually intense "acqua alta", or high water, which on Tuesday hit their highest level in half a century. "We've destroyed Venice, we're talking about one billion (euros) in damage and that's just from the other day, not today," Brugnaro said, as ...
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Unchecked use of antibiotics poses significant threat to freshwater ecosystem 15.11.2019
Washington: Residues from billions of doses of antibiotics, painkillers and antidepressants pose a significant risk to freshwater ecosystems and the global food chain, a new analysis said Thursday. There are growing fears that the unchecked use of antibiotics in both medicine and agriculture will have adverse effects on the environment and on human health. When animals and humans ingest medicines, up to 90 per cent of active ingredients are excreted back into the environment. Many medicines are simply discarded -- in the United States alone an estimated one-third of the four billion drugs prescribed each year end up as waste. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) compared data on concentrations of pharmaceutical residue in water samples worldwide as well as prescribing trends and water purification regulations in various countries. One study cited in its report estimates that 10 per cent of all pharmaceuticals are potentially harmful to the environment – including ...
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Garbage dropped by China, India into sea 'floats into Los Angeles': Trump 13.11.2019 The Asian Age | Home
Terming climate change as 'complex issue', Trump said he considers himself to be, 'in many ways, an environmentalist, believe it or not'.
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Global warming causing emergence of deadly virus 10.11.2019
Washington: Decline of ice in the Arctic sea can lead to the emergence of a deadly virus that could threaten marine life in the North Pacific, says a recent study. Phocine distemper virus (PDV), a pathogen responsible for killing thousands of European harbour seals in the North Atlantic in 2002, was identified in northern sea otters in Alaska in 2004, raising questions about when and how the virus reached them. The 15-year study, published in the journal -- Scientific Reports -- highlights how the radical reshaping of historic sea ice may have opened pathways for the contact between the Arctic and sub-Arctic seals that were previously impossible. This allowed for the virus' introduction into the Northern Pacific Ocean. "The loss of sea ice is leading marine wildlife to seek and forage in new habitats and removing that physical barrier, allowing for new pathways for them to move," said corresponding author Tracey Goldstein, associate director of the One Health Institute at the UC Davis ...
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Winds of climate change blow across South Asia 29.10.2019
The India-Pakistan enmity is possibly the world"s most intractable and obdurate, with a mutual misreading of history made extremely volatile with the brandishing of nuclear weapons. Despite having two giant militaries at each others" throats, the more immediate existential challenges that India and Pakistan face are related to how climate change and misuse of common natural resources have combined to confront both together. It is not the militaries which will determine our fates, but the degree of cooperation the two nations can summon. Our problems are common and perhaps India and Pakistan will find the good sense to act together? Looking at the climate change challenges Pakistan and India face together, collective action — as unlikely as it seems — may just be what is needed to secure the lives and livelihoods of future generations. According to climate researchers at Germanwatch, Pakistan ranks eighth on the Global Climate Risk Index, with over 145 catastrophic events — ...
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Subansiri dam work resumes after 8 years 17.10.2019 The Assam Tribune
Subansiri dam work resumes after 8 years
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India halved its poverty rate since 1990s: World Bank 17.10.2019 PTI: All news
India halved its poverty rate since 1990s: World Bank
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New power plants in Asia can face power scarcity 16.10.2019
Washington: A new study has found that climate change and over-tapped waterways may significantly affect developing parts of Asia because of the lack of water to cool power plants. The work was published today in the journal of 'Energy and Environment Science'. "One of the impacts of climate change is that the weather is changing, which leads to more extreme events -- more torrential downpours and more droughts," said Jeffrey Bielicki, a co-author of the study and an associate professor with a joint appointment in the Department of Civil, Environmental, and Geodetic Engineering and the John Glenn College of Public Affairs at The Ohio State University. "The power plants -- coal, nuclear and natural gas power plants -- require water for cooling, so when you don't have the rain, you don't have the streamflow, you can't cool the power plant," added Bielicki. That is already a problem for some power plants in the United States, Bielicki said, where extreme weather ...
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How will there be protection of biodiversity? 16.10.2019 The Asian Age | Home
Development of civilization in any natural zone would not have been possible if there had been no biodiversity on the planet earth.
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Blurring the boundaries 13.10.2019
In recent times, climate change and its implications on the environment and marine life has been a topic of debate for most climate advocacy organisations, nations and individuals, as the need to address the issue has now become more pertinent. And to address the issue of warming waters and ocean acidification at a global level and seek a solution through technology, five students from Mumbai will be representing the country at the third edition of FIRST Global Challenge 2019. Scheduled to be held between October 24 and 27 in Dubai, the event will witness the first all-girls team to represent India in STEM/robotics. "It is a matter of pride and pleasure. We hope that our performance at the global challenge will inspire and encourage other children," says 17-year-old Aarushi Shah from Bombay International School who is looking after the robot design, construction and electrical for this project. Aarushi along with Radhika Sekhsaria, Aayushi Nainan, Lavanya Iyer, and Jasmehar Kochhar will be ...
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Loggerhead population affected by climate change 9.10.2019
Greece: Freed from its eggshell by a volunteer, the tiny turtle hatchling clambers across a pebble-strewn sandy Greek beach in a race to the sea, the start of a hazardous journey that only one in 1,000 will survive. Kira Schirrmacher, 22, donning black gloves to gently ease the newborn loggerhead turtle on its way, grins at suggestions that she's a kind of "midwife". "Yes, I do that all day," says the German social sciences student, of her role. She's one of several volunteers monitoring the beaches of Kyparissia Bay, the Mediterranean's largest nesting ground for the loggerhead, whose scientific name is Caretta caretta. Tourism, climate change and good fortune all weigh on the future of the loggerhead population, which the International Union for Conservation of Nature lists as vulnerable. Even sun loungers on the beach that can snag the turtles and bright lights that lure the hatchlings away from the water at night are potential threats, say environmentalists. Growing in ...
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'First conserve, then consume': Mumbai man sets up novel way to save water 9.10.2019 The Asian Age | Home
He explained that the process can keep a check on the various problem that an urban and coastal city like Mumbai faces.
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Bihar floods: JD(U) lashes out at Giriraj Singh for criticising Nitish Kumar 6.10.2019 India – The Indian Express
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States on notice to cut plastic use 4.10.2019
Kochi: The Union ministry of environment, forest and climate change has issued guidelines to chief secretaries of states and administrators of Union territories on enforcing ban on single use plastic ban. The notice, issued by MoEFCC secretary C.K. Mishra, lists carry bags, food packaging, bottles, straws, containers, cups and cutlery among products will come under the definition of single use plastic category. However, certain single-use products like PET bottles used for beverages including water may not require prohibitive action and will come under the ambit of recycling channels under extended producer responsibility. All government and subordinate offices should be declared single-use plastic free. Use of plastic products like cutlery like spoons, bowls, cups, containers, PET water bottles, plastic trays, folders artificial flowers, banners, flags, flower pots and any other plastic materials for which alternative exists has to be totally banned in offices. Private sector should also encouraged to ...
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The floods in Bihar: The fault is not in our stars! 3.10.2019
Bihar"s devastating floods this year will be remembered for many things. The scale of human misery. Blaming it on the stars. Who can easily forget Union minister of state for health and family welfare Ashwini Choubey"s remark: "The downpour, which has been lashing Bihar for the past few days, is because of the Hathiya Nakshatra, during which sometimes there is very heavy rainfall. The rains have now taken the form of a natural disaster." Then there is that vivid photograph of deputy chief minister Sushil Kumar Modi and his family members being rescued on a boat from his flooded residence in Patna, which will surely  go down as one of the defining images of urban India as it seeks to cope with erratic and unpredictable weather, one telling effect of climate change. The number of floods in India have been steadily rising — 90 in the 10-year period between 2006 and 2015, up from 67 in the 10 years between 1996 and 2005, according to the UN Office for Disaster Risk ...
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Meet the man behind a staggering 970 solo street plays 2.10.2019 Lifestyle – The Indian Express
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Ian Chappell reveals one major effect of nature on cricket 30.9.2019 DNA
Chappell also believes that the increase in temperature will possibly add to the health dangers for players.
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Modi in UN Assembly 30.9.2019 Central Chronicle
Prime Minister Mr.Narendra Modi in the United Nations General Assembly has cautioned the world community that it has become absolutely imperative that the world unite against terrorism. The India has given the Buddha to the world and not war. He also said world should act now to safeguard our planet from pollution, global warming, poverty, […]
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Climate change threatens the nature of cricket, says Ian Chappell 29.9.2019 Sports – The Indian Express
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Drought-hit Australian towns prepare for ‘unimaginable’ water crisis 28.9.2019 World – The Indian Express
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