User: servelots Topic: iihs_feeds
Category: All-Channels :: Climate
Last updated: Jun 21 2020 03:29 IST RSS 2.0
 
1,459 to 1,478 of 1,523    
Uber brings selfie powered Real-Time ID Check to India 15.3.2017
Technology has the potential to solve some of the biggest problems being faced by the world today – congestion, pollution, global warming, access to healthcare and education, clean water, and much more. It’s also a powerful tool that can improve safety and security in ways not possible before. What’s more exciting is the potential for products and features to prevent issues before they even happen, that too with a simple and fun technology like a selfie! The Real-Time ID Check is such security feature which uses Microsoft Cognitive Services to protect both riders and drivers. How it works: Drivers are asked periodically to take a selfie in the Uber app before they accept rides. The company then uses Microsoft’s Cognitive Services to instantly compare this photo to the one corresponding with the account on file. If the two photos don’t match, the account is temporarily blocked while they look into the situation. Here’s how Uber plans on making rides in India safer: Trips are no longer anonymous. When a ...
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Steps towards a healthier Wayanad 15.3.2017 Hindu: News
Stress on need for planting bamboo saplings to restore the climate of the hills
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Food, energy, water security go together 14.3.2017 HBL: Home
Policies often place these in silos, instead of evolving an eco-friendly, climate-smart approach to farming
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Organic farming matters: The good, bad and consumer benefits explained 14.3.2017 Latest News
Compared to conventional farm, an organic farm appears to be better for the environment
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Scientists race to prevent wipeout of world's coral reefs 13.3.2017 Environment News, Earth News, Global Warming, Wild Life, Carbon Trading, Climate Business, Climate Change & Pollution News
The world has lost roughly half its coral reefs in the last 30 years. Scientists are now scrambling to ensure that at least a fraction of these unique ecosystems survives beyond the next three decades. The health of the planet depends on it: Coral reefs support a quarter of all marine species, as well as half a billion people around the world.
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Scientists race to prevent wipeout of world's coral reefs 13.3.2017
There were startling colors here just a year ago, a dazzling array of life beneath the waves. Now this Maldivian reef is dead, killed by the stress of rising ocean temperatures. What's left is a haunting expanse of gray, a scene repeated in reefs across the globe in what has fast become a full-blown ecological catastrophe. The world has lost roughly half its coral reefs in the last 30 years. Scientists are now scrambling to ensure that at least a fraction of these unique ecosystems survives beyond the next three decades. The health of the planet depends on it: Coral reefs support a quarter of all marine species, as well as half a billion people around the world. "This isn't something that's going to happen 100 years from now. We're losing them right now," said marine biologist Julia Baum of Canada's University of Victoria. "We're losing them really quickly, much more quickly than I think any of us ever could have imagined." Even if the world could halt global warming now, scientists still expect that ...
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Australia sees second year of Barrier Reef bleaching 11.3.2017
Australia's Great Barrier Reef is experiencing an unprecedented second straight year of mass coral bleaching, scientists said Friday, warning many species would struggle to fully recover. The 2,300-kilometre (1,400-mile) reef suffered its most severe bleaching on record last year due to warming sea temperatures during March and April. Bleaching is once again occurring, the government's Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority said after an aerial survey off Australia's eastern coast on Thursday. "Regrettably, the temperatures have been high on the Great Barrier Reef this summer as well and unfortunately (we) are here to confirm... a mass coral bleaching event for the second consecutive year," the Authority's reef recovery director David Wachenfeld said in a Facebook video. "And importantly, this is the first time we've ever seen the Great Barrier Reef bleached two years in sequence. We've seen heat stress build since December." The agency said more bleaching was being observed in the central part of the ...
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Uttarakhand: as problems pile up, youths see wisdom in migration 10.3.2017 Downtoearth
The ecologically-sensitve state is crying for government interventions on several fronts
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French fries on Mars could soon be a reality 10.3.2017 DNA: Wide Angle
Potatoes can be grown even in the extreme environment of Mars, according to a new study that has implications for future manned missions to the red planet as well as helping people survive in harsh climates on Earth. The International Potato Centre (CIP) in Peru launched a series of experiments to discover if potatoes can grow under Mars atmospheric conditions and thereby prove they are also able to grow in extreme climates on Earth. The Phase Two effort of CIP's proof of concept experiment to grow potatoes in simulated Martian conditions began in February last year when a tuber was planted in a specially constructed CubeSat by researchers from University of Engineering and Technology (UTEC) in Peru. The Potatoes on Mars project was conceived by CIP to both understand how potatoes might grow in Mars conditions and also see how they survive in the extreme conditions similar to what parts of the world already suffering from climate change and weather shocks are already experiencing.  "Growing crops under ...
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Growth inequality is emptying out villages in India's 6th richest state 10.3.2017 Business Standard: Front Page Headlines
Uttarakhand is the sixth richest state in India in terms of per capita income
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Experiment suggests potatoes could actually grow on Mars 9.3.2017 Technology – The Indian Express
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Potatoes can be grown on Mars: study 9.3.2017
Potatoes can be grown even in the extreme environment of Mars, according to a new study that has implications for future manned missions to the red planet as well as helping people survive in harsh climates on Earth. The International Potato Centre (CIP) in Peru launched a series of experiments to discover if potatoes can grow under Mars atmospheric conditions and thereby prove they are also able to grow in extreme climates on Earth. The Phase Two effort of CIP's proof of concept experiment to grow potatoes in simulated Martian conditions began in February last year when a tuber was planted in a specially constructed CubeSat by researchers from University of Engineering and Technology (UTEC) in Peru. The Potatoes on Mars project was conceived by CIP to both understand how potatoes might grow in Mars conditions and also see how they survive in the extreme conditions similar to what parts of the world already suffering from climate change and weather shocks are already experiencing. "Growing crops under ...
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How to take better care of Planet Earth 9.3.2017 Hindu: Home
We talk to our Kids columnist about her new book, So You Want to Know About the Environment
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Work on dredging tanks begins 9.3.2017 Hindu: News
32 village ponds being covered under a centrally-sponsored scheme
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INTERVIEW-"No time for trial and error" as Cape Town's mayor leads green push 8.3.2017 DNA: Evolutions
By Laurie Goering LONDON, March 8 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - National leaders may have been the ones to sign the Paris Agreement to combat climate change - but when it comes to putting the deal into effect, "it is cities that drive most of the change", says Cape Town's mayor Patricia de Lille.
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Warming may disrupt four-fifths of world's oceans by 2050 8.3.2017 The Tribune
OSLO: Global warming will disrupt four-fifths of the world's oceans by 2050 if greenhouse gas emissions keep rising, threatening fish that are the main source of food for a billion people, scientists said on Tuesday.
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Rs 16.76 crore surface water management project for Puducherry 7.3.2017 India – The Indian Express
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Warming may disrupt four-fifths of world's oceans by 2050-study 7.3.2017 DNA: Evolutions
"By 2050 around four-fifths of the ocean surface will be affected by ocean acidification and ocean warming," lead author Stephanie Henson, of the British National Oceanography Centre in Southampton, told Reuters of the findings.
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Warming may disrupt four-fifths of world's oceans by 2050 - study 7.3.2017 DNA: Evolutions
"By 2050 around four-fifths of the ocean surface will be affected by ocean acidification and ocean warming," lead author Stephanie Henson, of the British National Oceanography Centre in Southampton, told Reuters of the findings.
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Real or fictional, these women are heroines of all time 7.3.2017 Downtoearth
From the spirited Bathsheba to Mandakini Amte, from unrecognised midwives and unsung domestic labourers to fearless tribal activist Sumani Jogdi, these women deserve our admiration
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