User: servelots Topic: iihs_feeds
Category: All-Channels :: Climate
Last updated: Oct 22 2017 09:56 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Yatra to highlight tribal way of agriculture 22.10.2017 Hindu: News
Water, forest, land and seed were the key elements of the march
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Climate change and urbanisation impact 21.10.2017 All Current Affairs Stories
The global temperature since 1860 is observed to have risen by 0.4 centigrade
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Orientation programme on climate change held in Imphal 21.10.2017 The Assam Tribune
Orientation programme on climate change held in Imphal
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Earthmovers used to load sand on to trucks 21.10.2017 Hindu: Mangalore
Union Ministry guidelines are being flouted: Villagers
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Bad air, water kills: At 2.5 mn, India tops list for pollution-linked deaths 20.10.2017 Business Standard: Economy & Policy
India recorded the most number of premature deaths because of pollution in 2015 at 2.51 million lives lost, followed by China at 1.8 million deaths, a recent study has revealed
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Cat on the roof of the world 20.10.2017 HBL: Home
The key to Asia’s water security, the elusive snow leopard is bringing hostile nations together for its conservation
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World pollution deadlier than wars, disasters, hunger: study 20.10.2017
Environmental pollution — from filthy air to contaminated water — is killing more people every year than all war and violence in the world, more than smoking, hunger or natural disasters. More than AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined. One out of every six premature deaths in the world in 2015 — about 9 million — could be attributed to disease from toxic exposure, according to a major study released Thursday in The Lancet medical journal. The financial cost from pollution-related death, sickness and welfare is equally massive, the report says, costing some $4.6 trillion in annual losses — or about 6.2 percent of the global economy. "There"s been a lot of study of pollution, but it"s never received the resources or level of attention as, say, AIDS or climate change," said epidemiologist Philip Landrigan, dean of global health at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, and the lead author on the report. The report marks the first ...
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India’s methane emissions stable: study 18.10.2017 BusinessLine - News
A group of researchers have concluded that there has been no increase in the levels of methane emissions in India between 2010 and 2015. This is the first time that an independent assessment of India...
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Up in arms 17.10.2017 Downtoearth
Shrinking of the world's largest desert lake has triggered a survival battle among nomadic tribes in the Kenyan-Ethiopian border. Jitendra travels across Kenya's Turkana county to see how climate change and human activities have led to the crisis
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Heatwaves projected to become more frequent in India 17.10.2017 BusinessLine - Science
Heatwaves in India are projected to become more frequent during the current century under different climate change scenarios, a new study has concluded. Even if the global mean temperature is limi...
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WB-funded irrigation project to benefit 10 districts 17.10.2017 The Tribune
Tribune News Service Solan, October 16 Based on the success of the HP Mid-Himalayan Watershed Development Project, a new project “Integrated Development Project on Source Sustainability and Climate Resilient Rain-Fed Agriculture” worth $100 million (Rs 650 crore approximately) has been kickstarted from Solan for seven years. The project proposal was submitted to the Department of Economic Affairs (DEA), Ministry of Finance, through the Ministry of Agriculture (MoA) for clearance as it involved oversees funding. The DEA cleared the proposal involving funding from World Bank on July 26. The bank later accepted the proposal on August 4, paving the way for the project’s implementation. Project Director VRR Singh said the World Bank had pooled in $ 80 million (Rs 515 crore approximately), while the remaining share of $20 million would be given by the state. The duration of the project will be from 2017 to 2024. The HP Natural Resource Management Society based in Solan will facilitate its ...
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Rain comes as a blessing for rabi crops 16.10.2017 Hindu: Karnataka
State to increase sowing area by another 6 lakh to 7 lakh hectares
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Clams, worms release as much greenhouse gas as 20,000 cows: Research 16.10.2017 Technology – The Indian Express
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Baltic sea clams, worms releases as much greenhouse gas as 20,000 cows: Study 16.10.2017
Ocean clams and worms release a huge amount of harmful greenhouse gas into the atmosphere, almost as much as 20,000 dairy cows, a study has found. Researchers from Cardiff University in the UK and Stockholm University in Sweden, have shown that the ocean critters are producing large amounts of the strongest greenhouse gases-methane and nitrous oxides - from the bacteria in their guts. Methane gas is making its way into the water and then finally out into the atmosphere, contributing to global warming - methane has 28 times greater warming potential than carbon dioxide. A detailed analysis showed that around 10 per cent of total methane emissions from the Baltic Sea may be due to clams and worms. The researchers estimate that this is equivalent to as much methane given off as 20,000 dairy cows. This is as much as 10 per cent of the entire Welsh dairy cow population and one per cent of the entire UK dairy cow population. The findings, which have been published in the journal Scientific Reports, point to a ...
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The Great Barrier Reef can repair itself, with a little help from science 16.10.2017 Downtoearth
Corals on the Great Barrier Reef that are tolerant to warmer waters can be used to help repair other parts of the reef damaged by bleaching events
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Much about Mindlessness 15.10.2017 Panorama – The Navhind Times
Patricia Pereira-Sethi Whenever you feel you have done or said something stupid or undignified, or slipped head-first into an unsuspecting trap, fall back on the ensuing comments and you will automatically feel uplifted. In fact you might even begin to believe you are a prodigy. Here are some examples of arrant inanity collected for your ...
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One-day cracker ban isn't the solution 15.10.2017
For many years in the late Eighties and early Nineties, I used to work at our family textiles business. The factory was in Ankleshwar, an industrial estate about an hour"s train ride from my home in Surat. I would usually go to the factory in the afternoon, and return in the late evening. The business did not do that well and after Manmohan Singh liberalised India"s economy starting in 1991, we could not compete and shut it down a few years later. The factory put polyester yarn through a process called texturising, which made the plasticky yarn more wearable. This was done at high speeds and required a large air conditioning plant with a cooling tower. One day, the giant pipe, which was sending water up to the tower, fell apart. Its layers of metal flaked away like papad and I couldn"t understand why. That evening I stayed back in the factory a little later. As I was going to the station around 6.30, my throat choked on a fume of something that was pure acid. Another factory near ours ...
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Not just the wettest, but also one of the deadliest monsoons in Bengaluru 14.10.2017 Hindu: Cities
High-intensity rain coupled with crumbling infrastructure have resulted in the death of at least 15 people in Bengaluru since May
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Mysterious, massive hole reopens in Antarctic sea ice: All you need to know 13.10.2017 All Current Affairs Stories
Ocean convection occurs within the polynya bringing warmer water to the surface that melts the sea ice
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Giant hole opens up in Antarctica leaving scientists perplexed 13.10.2017
Toronto: A mysterious and massive hole, with an area of 80,000 square kilometres, has been spotted in the winter sea ice cover around Antarctica , scientists say. This opening, known as a polynya, is the largest observed in the Weddell Sea since the 1970s, according to Professor Kent Moore of the University of Toronto in Canada. At its largest extent, this winter's polynya had an area of open water close to 80,000 square kilometres, he said. Researchers said the event marks the second year in a row in which the polynya has formed, although it was not as large last year. Without the insulating effect of sea ice cover, a polynya allows the atmosphere and ocean to exchange heat, momentum and moisture leading to significant impacts on climate. Ocean convection occurs within the polynya bringing warmer water to the surface that melts the sea ice and prevents new ice from forming. Moore collaborated with members of the Southern Ocean Carbon and Climate Observations and Modelling (SOCCOM) project to ...
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