User: servelots Topic: iihs_feeds
Category: All-Channels :: Climate
Last updated: Aug 12 2018 05:53 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Innovate in India, do it for humanity: PM Narendra Modi at IIT-B convocation in Mumbai 12.8.2018 DNA: Mumbai
Prime Minister Narendra Modi called IITs 'India's Instrument for Transformation' on Saturday while lauding the institutes for enriching Brand India globally and catapulting the nation to the forefront of the world's technological powerhouses. The Prime Minister, who was addressing the 56th annual convocation of the Indian Institute of Technology-Bombay (IIT-B), said reputable institutes such as IITs would steer the course of development with the keystones of innovation and enterprise. Underscoring sustainable development, the PM exhorted the students to "innovate in India, innovate for humanity" in areas ranging from mitigating climate change to enhancing agricultural productivity, generating cleaner energy and conserving water. "The nation is proud of IITs and what IIT graduates have achieved. Their success inspired engineering colleges across the country, and this made India one of the world's largest pools of technical manpower,'' he said, in his 32-minute speech. "We must build on this. We must make ...
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Any society that does not innovate, 'stagnates': PM 12.8.2018 The Asian Age | Home
Asks teachers, intellectuals for ways to improve quality of education.
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World Biofuel Day event organized 11.8.2018 Free Press Journal: Business
World Biofuel Day 2018 event was organised in New Delhi on Friday, with the Prime Minister Narendra Modi
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Pipsi: A Bottle full of Hope Marathi movie: Review, Cast, Director 27.7.2018 Free Press Journal: Glam
Film: Pipsi: A Bottle full of Hope Cast: Sahil Joshi, Maithili Patwardhan, Ajay Jadhav, Atul Mahale,
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Centre takes serious note of Guwahati pollution levels 24.7.2018 The Assam Tribune
Centre takes serious note of Guwahati pollution levels
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Cloud brightening, 'sun shields' to save Barrier Reef 23.7.2018 DNA: India
Australia announced plans to explore concepts such as firing salt into clouds and covering swathes of water with a thin layer of film in a bid to save the embattled Great Barrier Reef. The UNESCO World Heritage-listed reef, about the size of Japan or Italy, is reeling from two straight years of bleaching as sea temperatures rise because of climate change. Experts have warned that the 2,300-kilometre (1,400-mile) long area could have suffered irreparable damage. While the government has pledged to tackle climate change -- the greatest threat to the world's largest living structure -- there has also been a push to explore shorter-term measures to buy the reef some time. Canberra in January offered Aus$2.0 million (US$1.5 million) to attract innovative ideas to protect the site, which is also under pressure from farming runoff, development and the predatory crown-of-thorns starfish. Six schemes selected out of a total of 69 submissions will be tested to see if they are feasible. One selected concept is ...
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Deep reefs won't be 'twilight zone' refuge for fish, corals: Study 20.7.2018 DNA: Money
Deep coral reefs in a "twilight zone" in the oceans differ sharply from those near the surface, dimming hopes that they can be a refuge for marine life fleeing threats such as climate change and pollution, scientists said on Thursday. Worldwide, coral reefs in shallow waters are among ecosystems most threatened by climate change. The Great Barrier Reef off Australia suffered severe bleaching, a whitening driven by warm waters that can kill corals, in 2016 and 2017. A U.S.-led team of divers who studied little-known reefs in the West Atlantic and Pacific Oceans between 30 and 150 metres (100-500 ft) deep where sunlight fades, found most species of corals and fish were unlike those closer to the surface. "We were surprised to find little overlap," lead author Luiz Rocha of the California Academy of Sciences told Reuters of the findings published in the journal science. Less than five percent of fish and corals were found in both shallow and deep waters against the scientists' previous estimate of 60-75 ...
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Problems mounting for tea producers 13.7.2018 The Assam Tribune
Problems mounting for tea producers
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African woman tells UN that climate change is security risk 12.7.2018 DNA: Bangalore
African woman tells UN that climate change is security risk
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Climate change causing high-altitude clouds to becoming increasingly visible 6.7.2018 The Asian Age | Home
Here is what a new study has found.
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Punjab grappling with shrinking water supply: Experts 6.7.2018 The Tribune
Tribune News Service Ludhiana, July 5 Agriculture consumes 86 per cent of Punjab’s water. According to agricultural experts, shrinking water supply is a major challenge for the state. Water table has gone down from 20 feet in 1970 to more than 200 feet in 2017. This was stated by Dr Manjit S Kang, Adjunct Professor, Kansas State University, Manhattan, US, and former Vice-Chancellor of the PAU, who was here to attend an international workshop on ‘Innovations in Sustainable Water Resource Management’at CT University. He said the WORLDCLIM- DIVA system prediction for Ludhiana/Punjab says there will be more than 2.5 C change in the average temperature in Punjab between 2000 and 2050. The average annual rainfall will decrease by 75 mm to 100 mm (11 per cent). “Agricultural sustainability depends on the sustainability of water resources,” he said. He said climate change impacted the sustainability of water resources. Droughts, heavy rains, unseasonal rains and floods were on the rise due to climate ...
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Governor stresses research in varsities to resolve local issues 5.7.2018 The Tribune
Tribune News Service Srinagar, July 4 During the first convocation of Central University Kashmir (CUK), Governor NN Vohra on Wednesday underscored the need for research programmes in universities to find solutions to local problems. In his presidential address, Vohra noted that the relevance of a university was determined by the extent to which its faculty and scholars were engaged in undertaking research programmes to find solutions to the problems faced by the people in the state. “I have been suggesting to the vice chancellors that the importance of their universities directly relates to the extent of research carried out on local issues, relating to climate change, preservation of water bodies, biodiversity and ecology, master planning of our cities, traffic management and other problems faced by our state,” he said. He said J&K had certain historical and geographical disadvantages which have constrained its growth as a knowledge society. “We have attracted many eminent academicians from outside the ...
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Eight countries come together to protect Bay of Bengal 4.7.2018 Downtoearth
With major GEF grant countries set aside political differences and try to restore the mangroves and coral reefs of the world’s largest bay
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Sanjay Mishra excited about his film on water crisis 4.7.2018 Free Press Journal: Glam
Sanjay Mishra is happy to be part of a film, which touches upon the issue of water crisis in a village
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Air conditioning could add to global warming woes 4.7.2018 The Tribune
WASHINGTON: The increased use of air conditioning in buildings could add to the problems of a warming world by further degrading air quality and compounding the toll of air pollution on human health, a study warns. Researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison forecast as many as a thousand additional deaths annually in the Eastern US alone due to elevated levels of air pollution driven by the increased use of fossil fuels to cool the buildings where humans live and work. “What we found is that air pollution will get worse. There are consequences for adapting to future climate change,” said David Abel, lead author of the study published in the journal PLOS Medicine. The analysis combines projections from five different models to forecast increased summer energy use in a warmer world and how that would affect power consumption from fossil fuels, air quality and, consequently, human health just a few decades into the future. In hot summer weather, and as heat waves are projected to increase in ...
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Uttarakhand cloudburst: urbanisation, warming continue to intensify the impact 2.7.2018 Downtoearth
Sunday's incident follows the trend of a steep rise in number of days with cloudburst-like events in the Himalayas from 2001 to 2013
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Uttarakhand cloudburst: urbanisation, warming likely factors for high impact 2.7.2018 Downtoearth
Data shows a steep rise in number of days with cloudburst-like events in the Himalayas from 2001 to 2013
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Savour these food items before you regret 1.7.2018 Free Press Journal: Food
The rising emissions of greenhouse gases, erratic weather and temperature patterns might make us miss
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Warnings from the past: Sea levels will rise, 78 Indian cities to see floods 29.6.2018 Downtoearth
While more than a century-old data projects a warmer world, India still needs a proper regional data on climate vulnerability
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Is India ready to face the silent disaster? 27.6.2018 Downtoearth
Heat waves are likely to increase by up to 30 times by 2100; the government needs to focus on the most vulnerable population, including the poor, women, children, elderly and disabled
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