User: sandman1965 Topic: Energy
Category: Nuclear
Last updated: Jul 14 2018 21:49 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 29,977    
Why the govt needs to okay <em>INS Vishal</em> quickly 11.7.2018 Rediff: News
'The INS Vishal -- a 65,000 tonne giant with 54 aircraft, including fighters, electronic warfare aircraft, airborne command posts and anti-submarine helicopters -- can both protect and dominate,' says Ajai Shukla.
Also found in: [+]
Struggling to save 2015 nuclear deal, Iran and world powers meet in Vienna 6.7.2018 DNA: Top News
Iran wants world powers to present measures guaranteeing oil revenue and investment into the country despite US sanctions when ministers meet on Friday to save the 2015 nuclear deal, but European states will fall short of its demands, diplomats said. President Donald Trump pulled the United States out of the multinational deal in May under which sanctions on Iran were lifted in return for curbs on its nuclear programme, verified by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Washington has since told countries they must stop buying the OPEC producer's oil from November 4 or face financial consequences. Foreign ministers from Britain, China, France, Germany and Russia meet with their Iranian counterpart in Vienna for the first time since Trump left the pact, but diplomats see limited scope for salvaging it. "The objective is to save the deal. We've made some progress, including on safeguarding some crude sales, but it's unlikely to meet Iranian expectations. It's also not just about what the Europeans ...
Also found in: [+]
Artificial Intelligence can accurately predict distribution of radioactive fallout 4.7.2018 DNA: Popular News
Scientists have created an artificial intelligence (AI) based computer programme that can accurately predict where emitted radioactive material will eventually land, over 30 hours in advance. "Our new tool was first trained using years of weather-related data to predict where radioactivity would be distributed if it were released from a particular point," said Takao Yoshikane from The University of Tokyo in Japan. "In subsequent testing, it could predict the direction of dispersion with at least 85 per cent accuracy, with this rising to 95 per cent in winter when there are more predictable weather patterns," said Yoshikane. When a nuclear power plant accident occurs and radioactive material is released, it is vital to evacuate people in the vicinity as quickly as possible, according to the research published in the journal Scientific Reports. However, it can be difficult to immediately predict where the emitted radioactivity will settle, making it impossible to prevent the exposure of large numbers of ...
Also found in: [+]
SC rejects petitioner's plea to close down Kudankulam plant, grants time till 2022 to build AFR facility 2.7.2018 DNA: Money
The Supreme Court today directed the Nuclear Power Corporation of India Ltd (NPCIL) to set up a facility for safe storage of radio-active spent nuclear fuel at Kudankulam Nuclear Power Plant (KKNPP) by April 2022. It rejected the plea of the petitioner to close down Kudankulum nuclear plant out of safety concerns.  The apex court, which had earlier granted time till May 30 this year for the purpose, extended the time for the NPCIL to set up the 'Away From Reactor Facility' (AFR) to store the spent nuclear fuel. A bench comprising Chief Justice Dipak Misra and Justices A M Khanwilkar and D Y Chandrachud considered the submission of Additional Solicitor General Tushar Mehta, appearing for the corporation, that the deadline for setting up of the storage facility be extended till April 30, 2022. The bench, however, made it clear that no further extension of time shall be granted to the corporation for setting up of the AFR at the nuclear plant in Tamil Nadu. The apex court had earlier allowed the Centre to ...
Also found in: [+]
Trump says Saudi king agreed to raise oil output by up to 2 million barrel, White House statement not so emphatic 1.7.2018 DNA: India
 The leader of Saudi Arabia promised President Donald Trump that he can boost oil production if needed and the country has 2 million barrels per day of spare capacity available, the White House said on Saturday. Trump told King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud that the oil market could with more supply when the men spoke on Friday, the White House said. The Saudi leader said he was ready to raise output if needed, the White House said in a statement. "King Salman affirmed that the Kingdom maintains a two million barrel per day spare capacity, which it will prudently use if and when necessary to ensure market balance," read the statement. The White House statement undercut a tweet by Trump earlier in the day when he wrote that Saudi Arabia had definitely agreed to produce more oil. "Just spoke to King Salman of Saudi Arabia and explained to him that, because of the turmoil & disfunction in Iran and Venezuela, I am asking that Saudi Arabia increase oil production, maybe up to 2,000,000 barrels, to make up the ...
Also found in: [+]
EDF, General Electric sign strategic cooperation agreement for construction of 6 EPRs in India 26.6.2018 Sify Finance
[India], June 26 (ANI): Xavier Ursat, Group senior executive vice president of EDF in charge of new nuclear projects and engineering, and Andreas Lusch, President and CEO of GE's Steam Power
Also found in: [+]
Iran will not succumb to US pressure: Hassan Rouhani tells Donald Trump 26.6.2018 DNA: Opinion
President Hassan Rouhani promised Iranians the government would be able to handle the economic pressure of new U.S. sanctions, a day after traders massed outside parliament to protest against a sharp fall in the value of the national currency. Washington is to start reimposing economic penalties on Tehran in coming months after U.S. President Donald Trump quit an agreement between major world powers and Iran in which sanctions were lifted in return for curbs on its nuclear programme. This may cut Iran's hard currency earnings from oil exports, and the prospect is triggering a panicked flight of Iranians' savings from the rial into dollars. On Monday, police patrolled Tehran’s Grand Bazaar as security forces struggled to restore normality after clashes with protesters angered by the rial's collapse, which is disrupting business by driving up the cost of imports. Defending his economic record, Rouhani said the government’s income had not been affected in recent months, and the fall in the rial was the ...
Also found in: [+]
Russia to supply technical security equipment to India 21.6.2018 Sify Finance
Russian state atomic energy corporation Rosatom on Thursday said that its subsidiary Nikiret has signed an agreement with Indian engineering services firm Core Energy Systems Pvt Ltd for the promotion of its technical security equipment in India.
Also found in: [+]
India has fewer number of nukes than Pakistan: Report 19.6.2018 DNA: Urban Tales
The world's nuclear powers are reducing their arsenals but they are also modernising, putting a fresh and "worrying" focus on strategic deterrence, a Stockholm-based think tank said Monday. "The renewed focus on the strategic importance of nuclear deterrence and capacity is a very worrying trend," the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) said. "The world needs a clear commitment from the nuclear weapon states to an effective, legally binding process towards nuclear disarmament," SIPRI head Jan Eliasson said. SIPRI, a well respected authority, said nine countries -- the United States, Russia, Britain, France, China, India, Pakistan, Israel and North Korea -- had 14,465 nuclear warheads at the beginning of this year, of which 3,750 were actually deployed. This compared with 14,935 warheads at the start of 2017, SIPRI said, with the reduction largely due to the United States and Russia as they fulfill arms control commitments agreed in their 2010 START treaty. The two countries between ...
Also found in: [+]
Elderly man, 9-year-old girl killed as quake hits Japan, no tsunami warning issued 18.6.2018 DNA: Mumbai
An elderly man and a young girl were killed, with several other people also in "cardiopulmonary arrest", after walls collapsed in a magnitude-6.1 earthquake that hit Osaka in western Japan on Monday, public broadcaster NHK said. Japan does not confirm deaths until a formal examination has been made and generally uses the term cardiopulmonary arrest in such cases. NHK said an 80-year-old man and a 9-year-old girl had been killed by collapsing walls. Live footage showed burst water mains and a house on fire after the quake hit Japan's second-biggest metropolis just before 8 a.m. (2300 GMT Sunday) as commuters were heading to work. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said the government was assessing damage and that its top priority was the safety of residents. The epicentre of the earthquake was in the northern part of the prefecture, the Japan Meteorological Agency said. The agency originally put the quake's magnitude at 5.9 but later raised it to 6.1. No tsunami warning was issued. Kansai Electric Power said no ...
Also found in: [+]
Kim-Trump shake hands, begin new era of 'terrific relationship' 12.6.2018 Sify Finance
US President Donald Trump shook hands with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un on Tuesday and welcomed the beginning of a "terrific relationship", a momentous step in an improbable courtship that has opened a new era for the worlds largest nuclear power and the most reclusive one.
Also found in: [+]
Mixed reactions for South Korea on Donald Trump-Kim Jong-Un summit 11.6.2018 DNA: Urban Tales
South Koreans are divided on generational and political lines about tomorrow's summit between the North's leader Kim Jong Un and US President Donald Trump. Some hope for an end to Cold War confrontation and that the North will eventually give up its nuclear weapons, others are sceptical about Pyongyang's intentions -- and some say they have too many economic problems of their own to pay much attention. Lee Eun-ho, a 70-year-old worker, said the North would never give up its nuclear weapons as Kim had "developed them to hold on to power in the first place". "I have little expectation from the summit," he said. Reunification, he said, would be impossible because four powers -- the US, China, Russia and Japan -- do not want to see a unified Korea. Choi Ho-chul, a 73-year-old former bank employee, said he doubts the North would give up nuclear weapons, which he said were a "means to control its population". "I bet the North will not abandon nuclear weapons," he said, adding that the US and its allies should ...
Also found in: [+]
6 weeks after Wuhan summit, PM Modi meets Xi Jinping again; agree on sharing Brahmaputra info, non-Basmati rice export 9.6.2018 DNA: Wide Angle
Prime Minister Narendra Modi today said he had detailed discussions with Chinese President Xi Jinping on bilateral and global issues which will add further vigour to the India-China friendship after their informal summit in Wuhan. During their meeting, which came nearly six weeks since the Wuhan summit, the two leaders discussed a blueprint for deepening bilateral relationship and reviewed the implementation of decisions they had taken in the central Chinese city. The meeting took place on the sidelines of the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation (SCO) summit and covered key aspects of the bilateral engagement, reflecting the resolve by the two countries to reset relations and bring back trust in their ties which was hit by the Doklam standoff and several other thorny issues. "Met this year's SCO host, President Xi Jinping this evening. We had detailed discussions on bilateral and global issues. Our talks will add further vigour to the India-China friendship," PM Modi tweeted after the meeting. External ...
Also found in: [+]
Training on plasma science 7.6.2018 The Assam Tribune
Training on plasma science
Also found in: [+]
European refiners to wind down purchases of Iranian oil post US sanctions on Tehran 6.6.2018 DNA: India
European refiners are winding down oil purchases from Iran, closing the door on a fifth of the OPEC member's crude exports after the United States imposed sanctions on Tehran, company and trading sources said. The drop in crude purchases from the Islamic republic could complicate efforts by European governments to salvage the Iranian nuclear deal disavowed by US President Donald Trump last month. Although European governments have not followed Washington by creating new sanctions, banks, insurers and shippers are gradually severing ties with Iran under pressure from the US restrictions, making trade with Tehran complicated and risky. Trump on May 4 announced his decision to quit the landmark 2015 nuclear deal between Iran and world powers and reimposed sanctions on Tehran. The restrictions on Iran's oil sector take effect after a 180-day "wind-down period" ending on November 4. Ministers from Germany, France and Britain have urged US officials to shield European companies from the sanctions, but refiners ...
Also found in: [+]
Iran refuses to cooperate with UN on nuclear inspections, says in 'no mood to go extra mile' 6.6.2018 DNA: Urban Tales
Iran will not heed a call to cooperate more fully with UN nuclear inspectors until a standoff over the future of its agreement with major powers is resolved, its envoy to the agency said on Wednesday. The International Atomic Energy Agency, which is policing the restrictions placed on Iran's activities under the deal, has said Tehran is implementing its commitments, but also called for "timely and proactive cooperation" on providing access for snap inspections. IAEA chief Yukiya Amano has said the comment is "not an expression of concern or complaints but rather an encouragement to Iran". Diplomats who deal with the agency, however, say it follows an inspection in late April that went down to the wire in terms of how quickly the IAEA team gained access to one site. Tehran's ambassador to the IAEA, Reza Najafi, said that, while it was not benefiting from the deal, "no one should expect Iran to go to implement more voluntary measures." European powers are scrambling to salvage the deal since US President ...
Also found in: [+]
Europe writes to US officials seeking sanction exemptions for its firms in Iran 6.6.2018 DNA: Urban Tales
Ministers from Germany, France and Britain have written to senior US officials urging them to protect European companies working in Iran from getting caught up in Washington's new sanctions on the Islamic Republic. In the June 4 letter, the foreign and finance ministers singled out key areas where they expected exemptions for EU firms, including pharmaceuticals, healthcare, energy, automotive, civil aviation, infrastructure and banking. Washington said last month it would impose new economic penalties after pulling out of a 2015 pact that world powers signed with Iran, under which Tehran agreed to curb its nuclear activities in return for sanctions relief. Germany, France and Britain were all signatories to that deal and said in the letter they were still committed to keeping it going. "An Iranian withdrawal from the (nuclear agreement) would further unsettle a region where additional conflicts would be disastrous," said the ministers and the EU's top diplomat in the letter to the US  Treasury Secretary ...
Also found in: [+]
Deputy Chief Minister Inaugurates 8th solar power plant in Uripok 5.6.2018 Manipur: E-Pao
Deputy Chief Minister Inaugurates 8th solar power plant in Uripok
Also found in: [+]
UN atomic watchdog confident of North Korea's role if nuclear deal is struck 4.6.2018 DNA: Top News
The UN atomic watchdog is confident that it is best placed to verify any nuclear deal reached with North Korea and would be able to deploy quickly, the head of the agency said on Monday. US President Donald Trump plans to hold a summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Singapore on June 12 in a bid to eliminate Pyongyang's nuclear weapons programme. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is best-known for its work in Iran, where it is policing the restrictions placed on the country's nuclear activities under the 2015 deal with major powers that Trump pulled out of last month. IAEA inspectors were expelled from North Korea in 2009. "No one said, 'If we reach agreement, please do the verification job'. That's not like that," IAEA chief Yukiya Amano told a news conference when asked if either side involved in the summit had indicated that his agency would be called on. "However, we have liaised with stakeholders and had a number of exchanges and through these exchanges it is very clear that if ...
Also found in: [+]
World saw largest rise in renewable energy capacity in 2017: Report 4.6.2018 Sify Finance
Renewable power accounted for 70 per cent of net additions to global power generating capacity in 2017, the largest such increase in modern history, a report said on Monday.
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 29,977