User: phantomvish Topic: Energy by Source
Category: Fossil :: All
Last updated: May 24 2016 13:41 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Letter: Rural Utah wants to be left alone 19.5.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
In his op-ed (“Environmentalists owe a debt to rural America,” May 15) Terry Marasco laid out his case for not only industry but the federal government to come to the aid of rural areas hurt by the current war on coal. His sentiments are kinder than most, but wrong nonetheless. Rural Utah doesn’t want more government assistance (interference). We want less. We want the government to quit subsidizing wind and solar (and coal) so that they can compete in the open marketplace. We want the presiden...
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Letter: Fossil-fuel 'development' plans only make things worse 19.5.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
The op-eds by Mark Compton, president, Utah Mining Association, and by Bill Johnson, president, University of Utah Faculty Senate, both argue for “carbon capture and storage” and “abatement” in their response to federal coal leasing and university fossil fuel divestment discussions. The technologies they desire were “developed” millions of years ago: coal, oil, oil shale. Except for the CO2 in the atmosphere, all the carbon we use is already “sequestered.” We insist on unsequestering it by burni... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Feds want to ensure coal companies can clean up land they damage 19.5.2016 LA Times: Nation

The federal agency that oversees surface coal mining said Wednesday that it would consider drafting new rules to ensure that coal companies can afford to clean up land they damage – though the announcement is not likely to lead to change soon.

The announcement, by the Office of Surface Mining Reclamation...

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Mine environmental risk grows with bankruptcies in big coal 19.5.2016 Seattle Times: Business & Technology

CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — As more coal companies file for bankruptcy, it’s increasingly likely that taxpayers will be stuck with the very high costs of preventing abandoned mines from becoming environmental disasters. The question is not if, but when, where and how many more coal mines will close as the industry declines, analysts say. Many […]
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Mine environmental risk grows with bankruptcies in big coal 19.5.2016 AP National
CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) -- As more coal companies file for bankruptcy, it&apos;s increasingly likely that taxpayers will be stuck with the very high costs of preventing abandoned mines from becoming environmental disasters....
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La Plata County officials tour King II coal mine site ahead of permit vote 19.5.2016 Durango Herald
In preparation of a long-awaited vote on a Class II land-use permit, La Plata County officials toured the King II coal mine site in Hesperus and surrounding residential areas Wednesday afternoon.County commissioners, planning and administrative staff and mine employees made several stops along County Road 120 to observe the impacts on...
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Oil and gas company founded by Aubrey McClendon to close 19.5.2016 Seattle Times: Nation & World

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — American Energy Partners, the Oklahoma City-based oil and natural gas company founded by the late energy tycoon Aubrey McClendon, is shutting down. The company’s leadership team released a statement Wednesday saying it had decided to wind down operations but the five independent companies it had launched wouldn’t be affected. McClendon co-founded […]
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Peabody approved for additional financing 19.5.2016 Steamboat Pilot
Debt-ridden Peabody Energy, owner of Twentymile Mine in Routt County, is hoping additional money will allow the company to continue operations as normal. During a Tuesday hearing, Peabody received final approval from the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Eastern District of Missouri for $800 million in financing. The financing is called debtor-in-possession financing, or DIP. Typically, DIP financial lenders are given priority in being paid back. The money will come from a lender group that includes secured lenders and unsecured noteholders, according to a news release. It includes a $500 million term loan, a $200 million bonding accommodation and a cash-collateralized $100 million letter of credit facility. "We are pleased with the outcome of today's hearing, including the court's final approval of our DIP financing," Peabody President and Chief Executive Officer Glenn Kellow said in the news release. "This marks another important step as we move through the Chapter 11 process and reposition the company for ...
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Bill Clinton’s Economic Exaggerations 19.5.2016 FactCheck
Former President Bill Clinton -- who will be called upon to help revitalize the U.S. economy if Hillary Clinton wins the presidency -- made two inaccurate economic claims in a recent speech in Kentucky.
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Republicans say Democrats should be afraid of running with Hillary Clinton. Are they? 19.5.2016 Washington Post
Republicans say Democrats should be afraid of running with Hillary Clinton. Are they?
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Licence to drill: Centrica awarded rights to explore Barents Sea 18.5.2016 The Guardian -- Front Page

Owner of British Gas criticised by Greenpeace for risking safety by drilling in Alaskan Arctic

Centrica has walked into new controversy by obtaining a licence to drill for oil and gas in the Arctic.

The owner of British Gas, fresh from rows over annual domestic energy profits, has been awarded rights to explore in the Barents Sea off Norway.

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Activists in Pacific Northwest Vow to Keep Fossil Fuel Industry on Notice 18.5.2016 Truthout - All Articles
Based in the Pacific Northwest, activists behind a multistate climate justice campaign remain committed to stopping all 10 terminal or infrastructure proposals still on the table for coal, liquid natural gas, oil and fossil fuel byproducts. Recent direct actions, which united Indigenous and non-Native activists, shut down oil rail lines for 34 hours and halted shipping to refineries. The "It's in Our Hands" march took place near Anacortes, Washington, on May 14, the Indigenous Day of Action. (Photo: Courtesy of Elliot Stoller) They call it a tipping point. It began with the "Shell No" mobilization last spring, when activists in Portland and Seattle thwarted the oil giant's Arctic drilling plans. Now, after days of successful mass actions with the Break Free From Fossil Fuels campaign, in which thousands of protesters on six continents took defiant action earlier this month to keep fossil fuels in the ground, from the coal fields of Germany to the oil wells in Nigeria, a cross-regional campaign that's ...
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Coal ash to be moved from North Carolina pits 18.5.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Raleigh, N.C. • All coal-ash pits in North Carolina maintained by Duke Energy power plants pose enough of an environmental risk that they should be excavated and moved by 2024, state environmental regulators said Wednesday. But the state Department of Environmental Quality said it’s asking for a change in state law that would allow it to reconsider its risk assessment in 18 months. The agency was required to submit its risk rankings by Wednesday under a state law passed in 2014 after a spill at ...
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Regulators: Coal ash to be moved from North Carolina pits 18.5.2016 Seattle Times: Business & Technology

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — North Carolina environmental regulators say all coal-ash pits at 14 Duke Energy power plants should be excavated and moved. Wednesday’s announcement by the state Department of Environmental Quality means 25 pits storing the residue left after decades of burning coal for electricity would be dug up and closed by 2024. Eight […]
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Protests Against Drilling on Public Lands Are Escalating 18.5.2016 Truthout.com
This story was originally published on May 13, 2016, at High Country News. The movement to halt oil and gas drilling on public lands kicked into higher gear on May 12, as more than 250 protestors tried to shut down a government oil and gas lease sale at a Denver Holiday Inn. The rally, which overtook the hotel parking lot and then occupied the lobby, was the latest and largest to target Western lease auctions held by the Bureau of Land Management in recent months. "This is an escalation of people moving to keep fossil fuels in the ground, and a message that leasing and these auctions need to end," said Jason Schwartz, an organizer with Greenpeace, which orchestrated the protest with Rainforest Action Network and a coalition of other groups. Protestors included supporters of climate and environmental groups from several Western states. "Every time we do this, it gets bigger," said A.J. Buhay, a protestor from Nevada. The  Keep It in the Ground  movement staged rallies in Salt Lake City and Reno in ...
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Can satellites be used to keep countries honest on climate emissions claims? 18.5.2016 LA Times: Commentary

When nearly 200 countries agreed in Paris late last year to work together to reduce emissions of the greenhouse gases that cause global warming, one crucial detail was left hanging: verification.

Under the accord, the nations backed a set of principles and goals designed to stop global temperatures...

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Five things to watch on oil’s price rise 18.5.2016 Financial Times US
There are key factors that can fuel crude beyond $50 or stall the near 80% price rally
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Falling energy prices hurt SSE profits 18.5.2016 BBC: Business
Energy firm SSE says plummeting wholesale gas prices and lower household energy demand led to a 19% fall in annual profits.
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Canada fires cost oil sands exports $985m 18.5.2016 BBC: Business
A new report into the financial impact of the McMurray fires says some C$985m (£528m) in oil sands production has been lost.
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Climate change: Australia's big banks urged to reject new loans for coal projects 18.5.2016 Guardian: Environment

Exclusive: Market Forces says halt to refinancing existing loans would also test banks’ support for 2C warming target

Australia’s big four banks could act on their stated ambition to help achieve a 2C warming target simply by giving no new loans to coal projects, analysis by financial activists Market Forces reveals.

Such a move – including a halt to refinancing existing loans – would virtually empty the banks’ loan book of the $8bn they are lending to coal in just five years.

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21 to 40 of 18,807