User: phantomvish Topic: Energy by Source
Category: Fossil :: All
Last updated: Sep 22 2016 16:20 IST RSS 2.0
 
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AP Moller-Maersk splits its shipping, energy operations 22.9.2016 Seattle Times: Top stories

COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) — Denmark’s A.P. Moller-Maersk A/S is splitting its container shipping and energy operations into two independent entities as part of a major shakeup. The Copenhagen-based group said Thursday the transport and logistics division will include its shipping, terminal and container businesses, while the energy division will handle oil drilling and production as […]
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AP Moller-Maersk splits its shipping, energy operations 22.9.2016 AP Business
COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) -- Denmark's A.P. Moller-Maersk A/S is splitting its container shipping and energy operations into two independent entities as part of a major shakeup....
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Sportsmen, conservationists want 2016 candidates to reject public lands transfer proposals 22.9.2016 Denver Post: News: Local
Colorado's lifeblood courses through public lands, particularly on the Western Slope, where millions of acres of federal land anchor the often conflicting economic engines of extraction and recreation.
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Replacing coal with natural gas is not a climate-friendly solution 21.9.2016 Seattle Times: Opinion

Two-thirds of natural gas in the country comes from fracking, which emits enough methane to rival the climate impacts of coal. Why follow two steps forward on climate with one step backward?
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As Saudi Arabia Diversifies, A Texas Oil Refinery May Be In Its Future 21.9.2016 NPR News
Analysts say Saudi Arabia's national oil company may be trying to buy a refinery in the U.S. It's part of an effort to build an economy that goes beyond oil exports.
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Scientists know climate change is a threat. Politicians need to realize it, too. 21.9.2016 Washington Post: Op-Eds
That's why we and 373 other scientists have written a letter about what's at risk.
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America's first wave-produced power goes online 20.9.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii • Off the coast of Hawaii, a tall buoy bobs and sways in the water, using the rise and fall of the waves to generate electricity. The current travels through an undersea cable for a mile to a military base, where it feeds into Oahu’s power grid — the first wave-produced electricity to go online in the U.S. By some estimates, the ocean’s endless motion packs enough power to meet a quarter of America’s energy needs and dramatically reduce the nation’s reliance on oil, gas and c...
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Great Barrier Reef damage costs shipper $30M 19.9.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Canberra, Australia • The Australian government reached a $29.6 million settlement with the owners of a Chinese coal carrier to pay for environmental damage caused when the ship ran aground on the Great Barrier Reef six years ago, the environment minister said Monday. The government had sued Shenzhen Energy Transport for at least $89 million (U.S.) in Australian Federal Court after the fully laden ship Shen Neng1 went off course in April 2010 and grounded on Douglas Shoal, 60 miles east of the t...
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A 'clean-energy champion?' Groups debate Rep. Mia Love's environmental stance 19.9.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
A wealthy conservative trying to push the Republican Party into fighting climate change has dubbed Rep. Mia Love a “clean-energy champion” and is spending at least $100,000 on digital ads supporting her re-election. The ClearPath Action Fund is a new group created by Jay Faison, a North Carolina entrepreneur, and his interest in Love is based partly on her votes during her first term and partly on what she may become if given more time in office. “Mia Love is a candidate who wants to do the righ... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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First wave-produced electricity in US goes online in Hawaii 19.9.2016 AP National
KANEOHE BAY, Hawaii (AP) -- In the waters off the coast of Hawaii, a tall buoy bobs and sways in the water, using the rise and fall of the waves to generate electricity....
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First wave-produced electricity in US goes online in Hawaii 19.9.2016 Seattle Times: Business & Technology

KANEOHE BAY, Hawaii (AP) — In the waters off the coast of Hawaii, a tall buoy bobs and sways in the water, using the rise and fall of the waves to generate electricity. The current travels through an undersea cable for a mile to a military base, where it is fed into Oahu’s power grid […]
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Energy: untapped potential 19.9.2016 Financial Times: Energy
Despite vast reserves of shale oil and gas and huge scope to produce renewable power, the country’s energy market is beset with patchy supply and low capacity
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Trump's climate science denial clashes with reality of rising seas in Florida 18.9.2016 LA Times: Commentary

By Donald Trump’s account, scientists have tricked Americans into accepting that global warming is caused by the burning of fossil fuels.

“I’m not a big believer in man-made climate change,” he told the Miami Herald on one of the rare recent occasions when he has talked about it.

A few blocks from...

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Why a Donald Trump Victory Could Make Climate Catastrophe Inevitable 17.9.2016 Mother Jones
This story first appeared at TomDispatch.com . In a year of record-setting heat on a blistered globe, with fast-warming oceans, fast-melting ice caps, and fast-rising sea levels, ratification of the December 2015 Paris climate summit agreement—already endorsed by most nations—should be a complete no-brainer. That it isn't tells you a great deal about our world. Global geopolitics and the possible rightward lurch of many countries (including a potential deal-breaking election in the United States that could put a climate denier in the White House) spell bad news for the fate of the Earth. It's worth exploring how this might come to be. The delegates to that 2015 climate summit were in general accord about the science of climate change and the need to cap global warming at 1.5 to 2 degrees Celsius (or 2.6 to 3.5 degrees Fahrenheit) before a planetary catastrophe ensues. They disagreed, however, about much else. Some key countries were in outright conflict with other states (Russia with Ukraine, for ...
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On renewables, Trump caught between corn, oil 17.9.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Donald Trump is trying to walk a fine line between Iowa corn interests and the oil industry. The Republican presidential candidate’s struggle to appease the antagonistic industries was in the spotlight Thursday when his campaign published a fact sheet calling for the elimination of a slew of regulations, including a scandal-marred system of buying and selling biofuel blending credits that some oil refiners hate. “The EPA’s renewable identification number program penalizes refineries if they do n...
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North Sea proves resilient to oil-price slump 17.9.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Oil producers in the North Sea were supposed to be among the first victims of OPEC’s battle for market share. Instead their high-cost, decades-old facilities are proving surprisingly resilient to the price slump. Crude oil and condensate output is likely to continue rising in the U.K. North Sea until 2018 as projects that were sanctioned before crude’s plunge four years ago start up, according to estimates by industry consultant Wood Mackenzie Ltd. Even though production dips after that, output ... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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U.S. rig count down two this week to 506 17.9.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Houston • The number of rigs exploring for oil and natural gas in the U.S. declined by two this week to 506. A year ago, 842 rigs were active. Depressed energy prices have sharply curtailed oil and gas exploration. Utah was one of 10 states — Arkansas, California, Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Wyoming were the others — where the number of operasting rigs was unchanged. Houston oilfield services company Baker Hughes Inc. said Friday that 416 rigs sought oil... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Hesperus coal mine lays off workers 16.9.2016 Durango Herald
Feeling the pressures of a depressed industry, the King II coal mine in Hesperus has restructured, resulting in the lay-off of seven full-time employees.Since the beginning of the year, King II’s workforce has reduced by nearly 30 percent. GCC...
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Duke CEO says utility avoiding LGBT law fight 16.9.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Cary, N.C. • Duke Energy Corp. aims to stay out of the fight over North Carolina’s law limiting protections for LGBT people, the company’s CEO said, noting the company is heavily regulated by the state. “I’m in a regulated industry with responsibility for keeping the lights on, and my focus is there and attracting a workforce that makes us better, and that’s a diverse workforce,” CEO Lynn Good told The Associated Press. However, Good also said that while the largest electricity company in the U....
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AP Interview: Duke CEO says utility avoiding LGBT law fight 16.9.2016 Seattle Times: Nation & World

CARY, N.C. (AP) — Duke Energy Corp. is staying out of the fight over North Carolina’s law limiting protections for LGBT people because as a heavily-regulated business it wants to stay away from the hot-button issue, the company’s CEO said. Republican Gov. Pat McCrory, who worked for Duke Energy for nearly 30 years, staunchly supports […]
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