User: phantomvish Topic: Energy by Source
Category: Fossil :: All
Last updated: Jul 23 2017 23:35 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Citizens Begin Reclaiming Coal Country After Decades of Corporate Land Grabs 23.7.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Kayford Mountain, destroyed by mountaintop removal mining. West Virginia native Larry Gibson's family has owned the land since 1797, yet coal companies moved forward with ravaging it. (Photo: Brennan Cavanaugh / Flickr ) Across central Appalachia, once-thriving mining communities have been ravaged by the collapse of the coal industry and the flight of jobs from the region. For a region that remains rich in natural resources, Appalachia's local governments continue to struggle to fund basic services such as housing, education and roads. One significant factor in the region's decline is the land. Since the coal industry began its decline, and even beforehand, millions of acres have essentially been removed from the region's economic production and tax rolls, and nothing has replaced them. Part of the answer to a post-coal economy may lie with an old land ownership study. "Land is the most important thing to us, yet it's not clear at all who owns it," says Karen Rignall, assistant professor of community and ...
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Trump to tap longtime coal lobbyist for EPA's No. 2 spot 23.7.2017 Washington Post
Trump to tap longtime coal lobbyist for EPA's No. 2 spot
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Letter: Everything on Earth is solar powered 23.7.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Solar energy, properly understood, is far and away the largest supporter of jobs on the planet. All agriculture/grazing/forestry is directly derived from sunlight. All above sea level water movement (as well as a lot below) comes from sunlight moving water into the atmosphere (yes, mountains as we know them, are created by the sun). All wind energy is dependent on sunlight. Amazingly, even oil, coal and natural gas are forms of solar energy. These extractive industries are the ugly side of what...
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Why Are the Danes So Happy? Because Their Economy Makes Sense 22.7.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Choose media with integrity: Support the independent journalism at Truthout by making a tax-deductible donation now! The World Happiness Report puts Danes consistently in the top tier. Twice in the past four years Denmark came in first. Danes also report more satisfaction with their health care than anyone else in Europe, which makes sense, since happiness is related to a sense of security and others being there for you. A fine health care system makes that real. The Danish approach is especially interesting to Americans because of the US suspicion of centralization. Danes prefer to administer their health care locally. On the other hand, they've found that the fairest and most efficient way of paying for their system is through income tax, most of which is routed through Copenhagen. The system delivers quality health care to all and costs Denmark only two-thirds what the United States spends. I'd like to hear Democratic US senators, who mostly reject single-payer health care (except for themselves), try ...
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Xcel, clean energy groups to regulators: Assign a cost to carbon emissions 22.7.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: News
The Minnesota Public Utilities Commission heard arguments over whether future energy decisions should consider a larger price tag for climate impacts.
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Accident at Florida power plant claims fifth life 22.7.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

APOLLO BEACH, Fla. (AP) — An accident at a Florida power plant last month has claimed a fifth life. BRACE Industrial Group said its employee, 56-year-old Armando Perez, died Thursday of injuries he sustained in the June 29 accident at the Tampa Electric Big Bend Power Station. Molten slag, a substance that can reach temperatures […]
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Dear Historians, When You Look Back at Trump’s First 6 Months, Please Include These Disasters. 21.7.2017 Mother Jones
This story originally appeared on The Guardian. Business and the Economy Given all that Donald Trump promised the business world during his bombastic campaign, it’s tempting to dismiss the president’s first six months with a “meh.” It would also be myopic. While protesters are worried about the future, the president has so far failed to pass his tax reforms, which business […]
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N Korea economy grows at fastest rate in 17 years 21.7.2017 BBC: Business
The mining and energy sectors helped push the growth rate to 3.9% - its strongest level in 17 years.
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Hydro, wind and solar make inroads in California's electric grid 21.7.2017 LA Times: Business

Wetter weather and continued growth in renewable energy sources resulted in some big changes in electricity generation in California in 2016, according to numbers recently released by the California Energy Commission.

Natural gas still accounted for the largest single share of in-state power generation...

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Tests find no detectable levels of toxins in drinking water 21.7.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — A water utility company in Tennessee says tests on drinking water revealed no detectable traces of arsenic and lead after the toxins were found in groundwater at a coal-fired power plant. Memphis, Light, Gas & Water said in a statement Thursday that tests conducted by an independent lab on 10 wells […]
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Coal Ash: Coming to a Town Near You? 20.7.2017 Mother Jones
The United States still relies on coal to provide 30 percent of its electricity, and a typical plant produces more than 125,000 tons of coal ash—the byproduct of burning coal—every  year. For decades, power companies dumped this product, which can contain toxic metals such as arsenic and mercury, into unlined ponds that had the potential to leak and […]
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NC governor on Trump drilling plan: ‘Not off our coast’ 20.7.2017 Seattle Times: Business & Technology

ATLANTIC BEACH, N.C. (AP) — Under pressure from President Donald Trump, North Carolina’s governor announced his opposition on Thursday to drilling for natural gas and oil off the Atlantic coast, saying it poses too much of a threat to the state’s beaches and tourism economy. Up against a Friday deadline for comment from elected officials […]
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U.S. Fines Exxon $2 Million Over Russia Sanctions Breaches 20.7.2017 Wall St. Journal: US Business
The U.S. Treasury Department imposed a $2 million fine on Exxon Mobil Corp. for violating sanctions on Russia while Secretary of State Rex Tillerson was the oil giant’s chief executive.
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U.S. says ExxonMobil violated Russia sanctions while Rex Tillerson was CEO 20.7.2017 Washington Post
The oil giant is accused of entering into a business deal with a Russian CEO with close ties to Putin, right after the United States imposed sanctions.
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Dakota Access developer's new pipeline rankling regulators 20.7.2017 AP Business
NEW WASHINGTON, Ohio (AP) -- The company that developed the Dakota Access oil pipeline is entangled in another fight, this time in Ohio where work on its multi-state natural gas pipeline has wrecked wetlands, flooded farm fields and flattened a 170-year-old farmhouse....
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Dakota Access developer’s new pipeline rankling regulators 20.7.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

NEW WASHINGTON, Ohio (AP) — The company that developed the Dakota Access oil pipeline is entangled in another fight, this time in Ohio where work on its multi-state natural gas pipeline has wrecked wetlands, flooded farm fields and flattened a 170-year-old farmhouse. The federal commission that oversees gas pipelines told Dallas-based Energy Transfer Partners last […]
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Dakota Access developer's new pipeline rankling regulators 20.7.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: News
The federal commission that oversees gas pipelines told Dallas-based Energy Transfer Partners last week to clean up its mess before it will allow the Rover Pipeline to flow.
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As Coal Jobs Fade, A Mining County Struggles To Redefine Itself 20.7.2017 NPR: Healthcare
Somerset County in southwestern Pennsylvania is deep coal country. For years, it's been looking to remake itself. Wind energy and health care may be its future — if it can attract qualified workers.
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East Timor vote highlights young nation’s uneven progress 20.7.2017 Washington Post: World
Almost two dozen parties are contesting parliamentary elections in East Timor this weekend that are likely to return independence heroes to power despite frustration in the young democracy with lack of economic progress and warnings the country could be bankrupt within a decade.
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East Timor vote highlights young nation’s faltering progress 20.7.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

DILI, East Timor (AP) — Almost two dozen parties are contesting parliamentary elections in East Timor this weekend that are likely to return independence heroes to power despite frustration in the young democracy with lack of economic progress and warnings the country could be bankrupt within a decade. East Timorese hope the elections will repeat […]
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