User: nwct Topic: Healthcare_USMag
Category: Healthcare_USMag
Last updated: Aug 15 2018 16:00 IST RSS 2.0
 
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What Was the Life of This Guest Worker Worth? 15.8.2018 American Prospect
On Sunday, August 5, a group of 200 farmworkers and supporters began walking at sunrise along the shoulder of Benson Road, heading north from Lynden, Washington, toward Canada. When they reached O Road, the marchers turned right to walk along the border. Unlike the frontier with Mexico, with its walls, floodlights, and patrols, the border line here is no line at all—simply a road on each side of a weed-choked median. The procession, chanting and holding banners, passed a succession of blueberry fields for the next 14 miles, finally reaching the official border crossing at Sumas. Pausing for a protest in front of the local immigrant detention center, it then continued on until it reached its objective one mile further on—the 1,500-acre spread of Sarbanand Farms. There, in front of the ranch’s packing and warehouse facilities, participants staged a tribunal. “We are here to assign responsibility for the death of Honesto Silva,” announced Rosalinda Guillen, director of Community2Community, one of the ...
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We Need a Public Option for Prescription Drugs 27.7.2018 American Prospect
(AP Photo/Elise Amendola) Kara Eastman, the Democratic nominee in Nebraska’s Second Congressional District, tells a story while campaigning about visiting her mother while she was dying from cancer. Her mother’s medicals bills were stacked so high on the kitchen table, Eastman says, that when she visited, they couldn’t see each other through the piles. Just one of her mother’s pills cost $2,500 a month. Eastman decided to run for Congress to offer alternatives to the skyrocketing cost of health care. She campaigns calling for Medicare for All and further solutions to the crisis of unaffordable prescription drugs. Her message is resonating. She beat a well-known opponent in her primary by a few hundred votes. Spending on prescription drugs is growing faster than any other sector of our health-care system. Drug companies, meanwhile, are raking in record profits, far higher than those in other industries—and they are spending considerably more of it on buybacks and dividends than on research and ...
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American Police Must Own Their Racial Injustices 18.7.2018 American Prospect
Tiko Aramyan/Shutterstock Americans rarely discuss racial injustice. When they do, many people treat the subject like an exorcised demon, a distant past without present-day legacies. But Americans still live in a country characterized by racial hierarchy that infuses its institutions and organizations. Lawmakers, reflecting the will of a sizeable portion of the public, set the laws that made slavery, Jim Crow, and mass incarceration possible. Schools, hospitals, businesses, and municipal agencies implemented those measures. And law enforcement exacted the consequences for disobeying them.  Police have been central to American racial injustice since our nation’s founding, when nascent police forces enforced slave codes. Today, the wars on crime and drugs continue to produce disproportionate and destructive enforcement in black and brown neighborhoods. Communities’ of color deep distrust of law enforcement is multi-generational and well-founded. And as the recent “ living while black ” incidents show, many ...
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Nevada Is About to Kill an Inmate Using a Drug Mix That’s Never Been Tried Before 11.7.2018 Mother Jones
Scott Dozier is scheduled to die on Wednesday. The Nevada inmate has been on death row since 2007 for having shot and dismembered 22-year-old Jeremiah Miller in a drug-related crime in 2002. Eight days before the execution, the state announced that they would use a new combination of drugs to put Dozier to death.  “There are so many concerns and […]
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Farm Work Can Be a Skilled and Permanent Job 11.7.2018 American Prospect
(David Bacon) Up and down the Pacific coast, many of the largest growers are rapidly increasing their use of guest workers recruited in Mexico as temporary harvest labor. Farm labor, in their view, is unskilled. The workers who perform it should show up at harvest time, work as hard as possible, and then effectively disappear until the next season.  This has been the common view for over a century. It is the justification for a renewed Republican push to establish a vastly expanded guest worker program. But is the road to improving the lives of farmworkers to legislate even more massive contract-labor programs? Or is it to treat farm labor as skilled and permanent work, and provide security and decent wages to those who do it? One Salinas grower, D'Arrigo Brothers Company, is choosing the second alternative, a choice its workers feel reflects the value of their labor. “I started working at D’Arrigo in 1979,” says Efrain Fraide, who works in a company broccoli crew. “I’ve cut and packed every crop they ...
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The Feds Are Locking Up Immigrant Kids—Who Have Committed No Crimes—In Juvie 10.7.2018 Mother Jones
Shortly after reaching the United States and turning himself over to Border Patrol, Alonzo, a 16-year-old immigrant from El Salvador, was invited to speak with a psychologist at the Bristow, Virginia, shelter where he was detained. She asked him to talk about his life back home, and he told her how his brother had been […]
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Democratic Senators Issue Last-Minute Warnings About Trump’s Supreme Court Pick 9.7.2018 Mother Jones
President Donald Trump will announce his pick to replace retiring Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy during a Prime Time slot on Monday night. As Trump spent the day wading through robed candidates, Democratic senators tweeted reminders that the president’s pick could undo Roe v. Wade:  All of Trump’s potential nominees to the Supreme Court vacancy want […]
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Ireland’s Path to Legalizing Abortion 5.7.2018 American Prospect
(Niall Carson/Press Association via AP Images) Supporters of the repeal of Ireland's Eighth Amendment await results of the referendum in Dublin on May 26, 2018. On May 25, 2018, I traveled from Washington, D.C., to Dublin to vote in a referendum that would decide whether women in Ireland would have full access to their reproductive healthcare and rights. I was one of the 40,000 diaspora Irish who returned from different corners of the globe (only recent emigres were eligible) to be part of a feminist movement that would make history. When the repeal of the Eighth Amendment to the Constitution was passed the next day with 66 percent voting in favor, the country heaved a collective sigh of relief.  In the lead-up to the referendum, women were forced to share previously untold stories of private ordeals and personal tragedies in order to persuade the Irish population that it could no longer export this problem to the United Kingdom. Women with diagnoses of fatal fetal abnormalities were not able to access ...
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Hawaii Just Banned 70 Percent of Common Sunscreens 4.7.2018 Mother Jones
In an effort to preserve Hawaii’s marine ecosystem, state lawmakers drafted a measure to outlaw sunscreens that contain oxybenzone or octinoxate, which make coral polyps more vulnerable to bleaching. On Tuesday, Gov. David Ige signed the bill into law, meaning that as of January 2021, the majority of sunscreens currently on the market will be banned in Hawaii.  “Our own interaction with […]
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Medical Board Sanctions Celebrity Doctor for Letting Parents Opt Their Kids Out of Vaccines 3.7.2018 Mother Jones
In 2015, California made it illegal for parents to opt out of vaccinating their kids because of their beliefs. But that didn’t stop some anti-vaccine zealots from dodging the shots: Last year, Mother Jones reported on a cottage industry of Golden State doctors who help parents secure medical exemptions with little clinical explanation. Last week, […]
The Idle Poor and the Idle Rich 3.7.2018 American Prospect
AP Photo/Mark Lennihan A man passes the famed bronze bull in Lower Manhattan IN A SPEECH LAST NOVEMBER, before the GOP’s tax reform became law, President Trump  told a crowd  in Missouri, “I know people that work three jobs and they live next to somebody who doesn’t work at all. And the person who is not working at all and has no intention of working at all is making more money and doing better than the person that’s working his or her ass off.” This imaginary person next door, presumably, was living off of welfare benefits, and that’s why welfare reform was needed. But consider another person living off government benefits—in the form of tax breaks. That person may not work much, or not at all, but typically has far more money than someone working three jobs.  As much as Trump and the Republicans malign the much-exaggerated idle poor, their tax reform is a major boost for the idle rich. Those who benefit from inherited wealth need not do anything to earn their windfall—just be born into the right ...
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A New Era for the Supreme Court 2.7.2018 American Prospect
The just completed Supreme Court term will come to be regarded as the beginning of a new era in constitutional history: a time of a very activist Court that aggressively follows the conservative political agenda. This term was the most conservative since October 1935, when the Supreme Court repeatedly declared unconstitutional key New Deal laws. The 2017–2018 term was a year filled with cases of unusual importance, and the conservative position prevailed in almost every case. One measure of this term’s conservatism is found by looking at the 5–4 decisions. There were 19 5–4 rulings out of 63 decisions. Justice Anthony Kennedy voted with Chief Justice John Roberts and Justices Clarence Thomas, Samuel Alito, and Neil Gorsuch in 14 of them. He voted with the liberal justices—Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Stephen Breyer, Sonya Sotomayor, and Elena Kagan—zero times. A year ago, in the ideologically divided cases, Kennedy was with the liberals 57 percent of the time. Two years ago, Kennedy was the key vote to uphold ...
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A Federal Judge Just Blocked Kentucky’s Plans To Cut Medicaid 30.6.2018 Mother Jones
On Friday afternoon, a federal judge put a halt to Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin’s (R) plan to impose work requirements for Medicaid recipients. The ruling comes in response to a lawsuit brought by 15 Kentucky residents enrolled in Medicaid who contested the work requirement, claiming it would “relegate them to second-class status within Medicaid.” Kentucky’s experiment was just […]
“This Is Devastating”: a Top Reproductive Health Researcher Talks About Kennedy’s Retirement 29.6.2018 Mother Jones
Now that Justice Anthony Kennedy has announced his retirement from the Supreme Court, vacating a seat that the Trump administration and conservatives in Congress are excited to fill, the future of abortion rights is in serious jeopardy. While the conservative justice has ruled to uphold abortion restrictions over his career, he has long been a stalwart defender of Roe as a constitutional […]
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Workers Running Shelters for Immigrant Kids Are Overworked, Undertrained, and Really Stressed Out 28.6.2018 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by ProPublica. The employees were in the ninth hour of another 12-hour shift Saturday afternoon at a converted Walmart now housing immigrant boys when a teenage resident took off. Staff members at the Casa Padre shelter had been trying for weeks to connect the 15-year-old with family. It didn’t seem to […]
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San Diego Has Gotten Hundreds of People Off the Streets. Now for the Really Hard Part. 28.6.2018 Mother Jones
As the summer of 2017 drew to a close, a hepatitis A outbreak forced San Diego officials to confront the reality that their efforts to address the region’s homelessness crisis were failing. Street encampments concentrated in the city’s downtown area had become like a petri dish for the virus, which is spread by contaminated feces. Twenty people […]
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Lice, Bedbugs, Chickenpox—Doctors Fear Migrant Children Aren’t Getting Any Health Care 28.6.2018 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by Reveal and appears here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. As thousands of migrant children have been taken from their parents and sent to facilities across the country, questions are growing about the medical care they are receiving—or, as health experts fear, not receiving. Since President Donald Trump’s “zero tolerance” policy for […]
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How the Tax Cut Sacks Puerto Rico 28.6.2018 American Prospect
GDA via AP Images Hooked on Drugmakers: For decades, tax favoritism—now withdrawn—brought pharmaceutical companies to the island and provided manufacturing jobs at well below mainland wages.  This article appears in the Summer 2018 issue of The American Prospect magazine. Subscribe here .  In keeping with the anti-Latino posture of the Trump administration, Puerto Rico has been subjected to a double policy assault on top of the natural disaster of Hurricane Maria. First, FEMA has failed dismally to respond to the human suffering and nearly $100 billion in damage from the hurricane, a display of both low priority and sheer incompetence that never would have been tolerated in a mainland state such as Florida where citizens can vote. Recent research suggests that the actual death toll caused by the hurricane could be more than 70 times the figure put out by the Puerto Rican government. And now, in the 2017 Republican Tax Act, the Republican Congress has added to Puerto Rico’s misery. It has undermined ...
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Supreme Court Blocks California Law Regulating Deceptive Anti-Abortion Pregnancy Centers 26.6.2018 Mother Jones
The Supreme Court issued a 5-4 ruling on Tuesday morning in National Institute of Family and Life Advocates (NIFLA) v. Becerra, a blockbuster case—and the first related to abortion since Neil Gorsuch became a justice—that could have major repercussions for the boundaries of abortion related speech. The majority sided with a group of 110 California anti-abortion crisis pregnancy centers, […]
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Researchers Find a Link Between Trump Voters and Opioid Use 23.6.2018 Mother Jones
A study published on Friday by scientists at the University of Texas and the University of Toronto points to a connection between Trump country and the nation’s opioid crisis. The report, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, gathered data at the county level showing a correlation between Trump voters and the drug epidemic. “Support […]
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