User: nwct Topic: Healthcare_USMag
Category: Healthcare_USMag
Last updated: Nov 21 2018 15:54 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Losing Amazon 21.11.2018 American Prospect
Neil Mitchell/Shutterstock An aerial view of Preston, England Last week, the cities still in the running for Amazon’s HQ2 officially found out the bad news: despite months of effort and billions of dollars in subsidies assembled, they will not be the new home for Amazon’s much ballyhooed second corporate headquarters, now split between two expansions in New York and Arlington, Virginia. This is, of course, how the game was going to go. The corporate attraction strategy behind these failed bids is premised on scarcity: in the end, it’s a zero-sum competition between cities. As the indefatigable researchers at Good Jobs First have amply demonstrated, this competition often turns into a race to the bottom, leading to questionable value for ordinary city residents as subsidies are lavished to bring the next big thing to town. Such reasonable critique is, however, cold comfort for the cities now contemplating their future without Amazon.  But in the North of England, there’s a story to be told that might help ...
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Challenges to Corporate Power Are on the Ballot­ 2.11.2018 American Prospect
Steve Yeater/AP Images for AIDS Healthcare Foundation Supporters of Proposition 10, in favor of rent control and building more affordable housing, listen to labor and civic leaders speak during a press conference in Sacramento, California.  Ballot measures don’t often earn much attention nationally, but such statewide initiatives are arduous to launch. They require an incredible investment in advertising and boots-on-the-ground organizing. And almost always, progressive measures face deep-pocketed corporate opposition. In spite of these incredible odds, several states are moving forward with ballot questions on a diverse range of issues from  housing  and the environment to  sexual violence . Next week Californians will weigh in on  Proposition 10  which would repeal a real-estate developer-funded state pre-emption law on housing that dates back to the 1990s and the administration of Republican Governor Pete Wilson. State pre-emption is a perfect example of a complicated concept—one that often carries ...
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Mass Transit in the Sun Belt 1.11.2018 American Prospect
This article appears in the Fall 2018 issue of The American Prospect magazine. Subscribe here .  Even in car-dependent middle America, there is support for local mass transit in surprising places. Some of these are blue cities in red states, with City Hall governed by Democrats or pragmatic Republicans. In some, the local business elite backs transit initiatives out of frank acknowledgment that reliance on cars has reached its limits. This stance, however, puts them at odds with more ideologically anti-government Republicans who typically control Sun Belt state legislatures. The pro-carbon obsession of the Trump administration largely eliminates federal funds, at least for now, as any sort of carrot. The transit coalition is also fragile. With mass transit underdeveloped and inconvenient, many suburbanites view buses as transit of last resort for the poor and prefer commuting by car. And in some cities minority communities want more transit in principle, but don’t trust that new rail lines will serve ...
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Mass Transit in the Sun Belt 1.11.2018 American Prospect
This article appears in the Fall 2018 issue of The American Prospect magazine. Subscribe here .  Even in car-dependent middle America, there is support for local mass transit in surprising places. Some of these are blue cities in red states, with City Hall governed by Democrats or pragmatic Republicans. In some, the local business elite backs transit initiatives out of frank acknowledgment that reliance on cars has reached its limits. This stance, however, puts them at odds with more ideologically anti-government Republicans who typically control Sun Belt state legislatures. The pro-carbon obsession of the Trump administration largely eliminates federal funds, at least for now, as any sort of carrot. The transit coalition is also fragile. With mass transit underdeveloped and inconvenient, many suburbanites view buses as transit of last resort for the poor and prefer commuting by car. And in some cities minority communities want more transit in principle, but don’t trust that new rail lines will serve ...
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Class Consciousness Comes to America 29.10.2018 American Prospect
Rosedale Avenue is a quiet street in Columbus, Ohio, with compact houses that are showing some wear. I recently spent an evening talking with some of the residents on their doorsteps about their jobs, the economy and the future. Tom, a friendly 23-year old covered in tattoos, was just pulling up to his home with his wife Megan, 22, and their two toddlers. They’d been middle-school sweethearts and have been working hard to build a life. Tom makes $14 an hour working with a landscape company, but because it rained that day, he didn’t work and didn’t get paid. Megan works part-time for $11.50 an hour at a candy store at a seasonal job. “My generation is screwed,” Tom tells me. “They all live with their parents, playing video games. I’ve got 20 cousins like that. There are plenty of jobs—but not enough good jobs,” he continues. “Our parents had good jobs. We can’t pay the bills.” What would help? “I’d love to be in a union,” he says. “I’m fine paying dues—I’d be making more money. Unions would make the ...
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The Truth About the Trump Economy 16.10.2018 American Prospect
AP Photo/Andrew Harnik President Donald Trump speaks at a rally at Alumni Coliseum in Richmond, Kentucky. I keep hearing that although Trump is a scoundrel or worse, at least he’s presiding over a great economy.  As White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow recently put it, “The single biggest story this year is an economic boom that is durable and lasting.” Really? Look closely at the living standards of most Americans, and you get a very different picture.  Yes, the stock market has boomed since Trump became president. But it’s looking increasingly wobbly as Trump’s trade wars take a toll.  Over 80 percent of the stock market is owned by the richest 10 percent of Americans anyway, so most Americans never got much out of Trump’s market boom to begin with.   The trade wars are about to take a toll on ordinary workers. Trump’s steel tariffs have cost Ford $1 billion so far, for example, forcing the automaker to plan mass layoffs.   What about economic growth? Data from the Commerce Department shows the ...
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DHS Kicks the Ladder from Under Immigrants Seeking Green Cards 16.10.2018 American Prospect
(AP Photo/Alex Brandon) Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen during a huearing of the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs on October 10, 2018 Capital & Main  is an award-winning publication that reports from California on economic, political and social issues. The American Prospect is co-publishing this piece. Immigrants who use Medicaid, food stamps, housing assistance or Medicare prescription drug subsidies could be barred from obtaining green cards or visa extensions under a proposed rule the Department of Homeland Security published in the Federal Register on October 10. Currently only those who use cash assistance or who require long-term institutional care at government expense are barred on public charge grounds. Immigrant-rights advocates, health-care providers, and local governments predict devastating results, especially in California and other states with large immigrant populations: Millions of people would go hungry or forego medical treatment for fear they ...
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It's Time To Go Further to End the Opioid Crisis 26.9.2018 American Prospect
(AP Photo/Rick Bowmer) Syringes of the opioid painkiller fentanyl are shown in the inpatient pharmacy at the University of Utah Hospital in Salt Lake City. Shortly after the Centers for Disease Control issued the sobering news that an estimated 72,000 Americans died of drug overdoses last year—the most ever—the Senate passed the Opioid Crisis Response Act of 2018 . Approved with bipartisan support on September 17, the bill takes reasonable measures to combat the over-prescription of opioid painkillers and slow the flow of illicit drugs, such as the hyper-lethal fentanyl, entering the country. The measure includes improved detection and testing technology at the border; grants for comprehensive treatment recovery centers in the hardest-hit communities; first-responder training; and support services for children and families affected by the crisis. But the legislation also has vague language about setting more stringent requirements for manufacturers and distributors, including a provision allowing ...
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Trump Launches Aggressive Poverty Disinformation Campaign 10.9.2018 American Prospect
AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana Demonstrators march outside the U.S. Capitol during the Poor People's Campaign rally at the National Mall in Washington Just how many Americans are poor? The Trump administration wants you to believe that just 3 percent of the U.S. population is poor. The Council of Economic Advisers made that claim in a  little-noticed report  published earlier this summer, as part of a coordinated effort to justify harsh new restrictions on government assistance programs. This bad-faith estimate emerged more from a desire to hurt the poor than to engage in honest policymaking on the issue of poverty. In March, the Congressional Budget Office found that  nearly half of social safety net payments  are going to people that the federal government once considered "middle class." Think about that: At a time when even the middle class is starting to look poor, the administration argues that not even the poor are poor so that federal officials can move to cut programs that both groups now rely on to ...
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The Next Crash 4.9.2018 American Prospect
  AP Photo/Richard Drew A screen above the trading floor of the New York Stock Exchange shows an intra-day number for the S&P 500 index September 15 will mark the tenth anniversary of the collapse of  Lehman Brothers  and near meltdown of Wall Street, followed by the Great Recession. Since hitting bottom in 2009, the economy has grown steadily, the stock market has soared, and corporate profits have ballooned. But most Americans are still living in the shadow of the Great Recession. More have jobs, to be sure. But they haven’t seen any rise in their wages, adjusted for inflation. Many are worse off due to the escalating costs of housing, healthcare, and education. And the value of whatever assets they own is  less  than in 2007. Last year, about 40 percent of American families struggled to meet at least one basic need—food, health care, housing, or utilities,  according to an Urban Institute survey.  All of which suggests we’re careening toward the same sort of crash we had in 2008, and possibly as bad ...
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‘Essure Problems’: A Contraceptive Device Creates an E-Sisterhood of Suffering 20.8.2018 American Prospect
(Shutterstock) Since 2002, Essure has been marketed as a permanent birth control method for women that is convenient and can be performed in their own doctor’s office. The procedure is simple: A 4-centimeter metal coil is inserted through the cervix and placed into each fallopian tube, where scar tissue builds and eventually blocks sperm from reaching an egg. Resembling the spring of a ballpoint pen, the medical device requires no incision or invasive surgery, and offers women an alternative to a hysterectomy. Women can even go back to work the very next day. So far, the device remains the only FDA-approved, non-incisional form of permanent birth control. But this July, Bayer Pharmaceuticals announced it would stop selling the device by the end of 2018, citing declining sales. However, the roughly 17,000 lawsuits filed against Bayer by women who have used Essure as well as a damning Netflix documentary that spotlighted the medical device industry may also have been factors. A Facebook group, “Essure ...
What Was the Life of This Guest Worker Worth? 15.8.2018 American Prospect
On Sunday, August 5, a group of 200 farmworkers and supporters began walking at sunrise along the shoulder of Benson Road, heading north from Lynden, Washington, toward Canada. When they reached O Road, the marchers turned right to walk along the border. Unlike the frontier with Mexico, with its walls, floodlights, and patrols, the border line here is no line at all—simply a road on each side of a weed-choked median. The procession, chanting and holding banners, passed a succession of blueberry fields for the next 14 miles, finally reaching the official border crossing at Sumas. Pausing for a protest in front of the local immigrant detention center, it then continued on until it reached its objective one mile further on—the 1,500-acre spread of Sarbanand Farms. There, in front of the ranch’s packing and warehouse facilities, participants staged a tribunal. “We are here to assign responsibility for the death of Honesto Silva,” announced Rosalinda Guillen, director of Community2Community, one of the ...
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We Need a Public Option for Prescription Drugs 27.7.2018 American Prospect
(AP Photo/Elise Amendola) Kara Eastman, the Democratic nominee in Nebraska’s Second Congressional District, tells a story while campaigning about visiting her mother while she was dying from cancer. Her mother’s medicals bills were stacked so high on the kitchen table, Eastman says, that when she visited, they couldn’t see each other through the piles. Just one of her mother’s pills cost $2,500 a month. Eastman decided to run for Congress to offer alternatives to the skyrocketing cost of health care. She campaigns calling for Medicare for All and further solutions to the crisis of unaffordable prescription drugs. Her message is resonating. She beat a well-known opponent in her primary by a few hundred votes. Spending on prescription drugs is growing faster than any other sector of our health-care system. Drug companies, meanwhile, are raking in record profits, far higher than those in other industries—and they are spending considerably more of it on buybacks and dividends than on research and ...
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American Police Must Own Their Racial Injustices 18.7.2018 American Prospect
Tiko Aramyan/Shutterstock Americans rarely discuss racial injustice. When they do, many people treat the subject like an exorcised demon, a distant past without present-day legacies. But Americans still live in a country characterized by racial hierarchy that infuses its institutions and organizations. Lawmakers, reflecting the will of a sizeable portion of the public, set the laws that made slavery, Jim Crow, and mass incarceration possible. Schools, hospitals, businesses, and municipal agencies implemented those measures. And law enforcement exacted the consequences for disobeying them.  Police have been central to American racial injustice since our nation’s founding, when nascent police forces enforced slave codes. Today, the wars on crime and drugs continue to produce disproportionate and destructive enforcement in black and brown neighborhoods. Communities’ of color deep distrust of law enforcement is multi-generational and well-founded. And as the recent “ living while black ” incidents show, many ...
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Nevada Is About to Kill an Inmate Using a Drug Mix That’s Never Been Tried Before 11.7.2018 Mother Jones
Scott Dozier is scheduled to die on Wednesday. The Nevada inmate has been on death row since 2007 for having shot and dismembered 22-year-old Jeremiah Miller in a drug-related crime in 2002. Eight days before the execution, the state announced that they would use a new combination of drugs to put Dozier to death.  “There are so many concerns and […]
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Farm Work Can Be a Skilled and Permanent Job 11.7.2018 American Prospect
(David Bacon) Up and down the Pacific coast, many of the largest growers are rapidly increasing their use of guest workers recruited in Mexico as temporary harvest labor. Farm labor, in their view, is unskilled. The workers who perform it should show up at harvest time, work as hard as possible, and then effectively disappear until the next season.  This has been the common view for over a century. It is the justification for a renewed Republican push to establish a vastly expanded guest worker program. But is the road to improving the lives of farmworkers to legislate even more massive contract-labor programs? Or is it to treat farm labor as skilled and permanent work, and provide security and decent wages to those who do it? One Salinas grower, D'Arrigo Brothers Company, is choosing the second alternative, a choice its workers feel reflects the value of their labor. “I started working at D’Arrigo in 1979,” says Efrain Fraide, who works in a company broccoli crew. “I’ve cut and packed every crop they ...
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The Feds Are Locking Up Immigrant Kids—Who Have Committed No Crimes—In Juvie 10.7.2018 Mother Jones
Shortly after reaching the United States and turning himself over to Border Patrol, Alonzo, a 16-year-old immigrant from El Salvador, was invited to speak with a psychologist at the Bristow, Virginia, shelter where he was detained. She asked him to talk about his life back home, and he told her how his brother had been […]
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Democratic Senators Issue Last-Minute Warnings About Trump’s Supreme Court Pick 9.7.2018 Mother Jones
President Donald Trump will announce his pick to replace retiring Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy during a Prime Time slot on Monday night. As Trump spent the day wading through robed candidates, Democratic senators tweeted reminders that the president’s pick could undo Roe v. Wade:  All of Trump’s potential nominees to the Supreme Court vacancy want […]
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Ireland’s Path to Legalizing Abortion 5.7.2018 American Prospect
(Niall Carson/Press Association via AP Images) Supporters of the repeal of Ireland's Eighth Amendment await results of the referendum in Dublin on May 26, 2018. On May 25, 2018, I traveled from Washington, D.C., to Dublin to vote in a referendum that would decide whether women in Ireland would have full access to their reproductive healthcare and rights. I was one of the 40,000 diaspora Irish who returned from different corners of the globe (only recent emigres were eligible) to be part of a feminist movement that would make history. When the repeal of the Eighth Amendment to the Constitution was passed the next day with 66 percent voting in favor, the country heaved a collective sigh of relief.  In the lead-up to the referendum, women were forced to share previously untold stories of private ordeals and personal tragedies in order to persuade the Irish population that it could no longer export this problem to the United Kingdom. Women with diagnoses of fatal fetal abnormalities were not able to access ...
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Hawaii Just Banned 70 Percent of Common Sunscreens 4.7.2018 Mother Jones
In an effort to preserve Hawaii’s marine ecosystem, state lawmakers drafted a measure to outlaw sunscreens that contain oxybenzone or octinoxate, which make coral polyps more vulnerable to bleaching. On Tuesday, Gov. David Ige signed the bill into law, meaning that as of January 2021, the majority of sunscreens currently on the market will be banned in Hawaii.  “Our own interaction with […]
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