User: newstrust Topic: poverty
Category: Unemployment
Last updated: Oct 15 2018 20:31 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Affluent cities gained at expense of Trump’s ‘forgotten’ America study 15.10.2018 Raw Story

The economic divide between affluent U.S. cities and suburbs and the ailing, often rural, areas where blue collar and middle-tier service jobs are the norm grew wider after the onset of the Great Recession, a Washington-based think tank said on Monday. The crisis and ensuing rebound saw a “reshuffli...

The post Affluent cities gained at expense of Trump’s ‘forgotten’ America study appeared first on Raw Story.

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Election 2018: What’s at Stake for Families 13.10.2018 Truthout.com
The interwoven nature of the challenges ahead carry great political dangers.

The post Election 2018: What’s at Stake for Families appeared first on Truthout.

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In a Blow to Labor, Teamsters Ratify UPS Contract Despite “No” Vote 11.10.2018 Truthout.com
The union ratified the US's largest private-sector contract over members' wishes that they return to the table.

The post In a Blow to Labor, Teamsters Ratify UPS Contract Despite “No” Vote appeared first on Truthout.

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Presidential Election Is a Fight for Democracy in Brazil 7.10.2018 Truthout.com
The threat of a military dictatorship is surfacing.

The post Presidential Election Is a Fight for Democracy in Brazil appeared first on Truthout.

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D.C. Council Repeals Wage Bump for Tipped Workers, Will of Voters Be Damned 5.10.2018 American Prospect
trickle-downers.jpg Washington, D.C., lawmakers voted 8 to 5 on Tuesday to repeal a voter-passed ballot measure known as Initiative 77—the will of their constituents be damned. Initiative 77, which received 55 percent of the vote in the June primary election, would have gradually raised the minimum wage for tipped workers in the District, starting with a modest increase on October 9, eventually reaching parity with the city’s minimum wage in 2026. Currently, employers are allowed to pay tipped workers less than the District’s $13.25 minimum wage, so long as their tips make up the difference. The council’s vote snuffed out, at least temporarily, what had become a major flashpoint in local politics, one that pitted restaurant owners, restaurant lobbying groups, and high-earning servers and bartenders against worker-advocacy organizations and lower-earning tipped workers. In a 16-hour public hearing in September, opponents of Initiative 77 warned that the measure would deal a fatal blow to many local ...
Caving to Pressure, Amazon Hikes Minimum Wage to $15 an Hour 2.10.2018 Truthout.com
Jeff Bezos is not raising wages out of the kindness of his heart.

The post Caving to Pressure, Amazon Hikes Minimum Wage to $15 an Hour appeared first on Truthout.

Why Shouldn’t Bartenders Be Rich? 1.10.2018 American Prospect
wavebreakmedia/Shutterstock This week, Washington, D.C.’s city council will vote on whether to repeal Initiative 77, which would phase out the sub-minimum wage for D.C.'s tipped workers over the next seven years.  In defending the initiative, the pro-77 coalition has looked primarily to D.C.’s low-income tipped workers. They have stated (correctly) that one in seven D.C. tipped workers live in poverty; they have noted (smartly) that the typical D.C. tipped worker makes one-third what the typical non-tipped worker makes; and they have highlighted (importantly) the stories of non-restaurant tipped workers like my friend  Dia King , who straddles the poverty line as a valet attendant. And indeed, the needs of low-income tipped workers are the most compelling reason to end the tipped minimum wage. But Initiative 77 will improve the earnings of D.C.’s most successful restaurant workers as well, challenging the prevailing notion that service work is necessarily low-wage—and we should welcome that. We should ...
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Tipped Workers Do Better When They’re Paid the Same as Everyone Else 13.9.2018 American Prospect
trickle-downers_35.jpg The debate over increasing the minimum wage for tipped workers in Washington, D.C., is set to resume next week, as the D.C. City Council returns from its summer recess to decide the future of the voter-approved ballot measure known as Initiative 77.  Initiative 77, which passed with 55 percent of vote in the low-turnout June primary election, would gradually increase the tipped minimum wage over the next eight years until it reaches parity with the city’s regular minimum wage of $15 in 2026.  Currently, tipped workers in the District must be paid at least $3.89 an hour. If their earnings fall short of the city’s $13.25 minimum wage after counting tips, employers are then required to make up the difference. Gratuities paid by the customer that cover $9.36 difference between the two wages is known as the “tip credit.” Eight states, including California and Washington, have eliminated or begun to phase out the tip credit, bringing the wages of their tipped workers in line with the ...
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Census: Black, Latino Minnesotans share in broad income gains 13.9.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: News
According to U.S. Census figures, the overall median household income of the state rose to $68,400. Black households experienced a bump in income for the third year in a row to $38,100. Black and Latino households each gained about $4,000 in 2017.
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Stuart Varney's Guest Tossed Off Set For Defending Universal Income: 'You Have Too Much' 12.9.2018 Crooks Liars
Stuart Varney is worth a reported ten million dollars, and gets paid in the hundreds of thousands by Fox Business to tell white retired people (who got THEIR pension and everyone else is a moocher) that minimum wage earners are greedy for wanting $15.00 an hour. Watching a fearless economist (Axios's Felix Salmon) call for Universal Basic Income and then tell Varney to his face that, quote, "You have too much"? Priceless! Transcript via Media Matters: STUART VARNEY (HOST): Felix Salmon is with us, he is the chief financial correspondent at Axios, and he knows a thing or two about social networks and regulations. Good morning, Felix. FELIX SALMON (AXIOS): And even universal basic income, which is a great idea, I'm all in favor of that. VARNEY: What? You don't believe that. SALMON: If Mike Huckabee actually wants to take people from poverty and put them into work, if you look at the actual evidence -- VARNEY: Oh God. ASHLEY WEBSTER (FOX BUSINESS): Oh God. SALMON: Giving people guaranteed money increases ...
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Trump’s Economy Is on a Path to a Bust 10.9.2018 Truthout.com
The Trump economy transfers more wealth and buying power from American workers to the wealthy 1 percent.

The post Trump’s Economy Is on a Path to a Bust appeared first on Truthout.

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The Next Crash 4.9.2018 American Prospect
  AP Photo/Richard Drew A screen above the trading floor of the New York Stock Exchange shows an intra-day number for the S&P 500 index September 15 will mark the tenth anniversary of the collapse of  Lehman Brothers  and near meltdown of Wall Street, followed by the Great Recession. Since hitting bottom in 2009, the economy has grown steadily, the stock market has soared, and corporate profits have ballooned. But most Americans are still living in the shadow of the Great Recession. More have jobs, to be sure. But they haven’t seen any rise in their wages, adjusted for inflation. Many are worse off due to the escalating costs of housing, healthcare, and education. And the value of whatever assets they own is  less  than in 2007. Last year, about 40 percent of American families struggled to meet at least one basic need—food, health care, housing, or utilities,  according to an Urban Institute survey.  All of which suggests we’re careening toward the same sort of crash we had in 2008, and possibly as bad ...
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Are American Workers Really Allergic to Socialism? 3.9.2018 Truthout.com
At a time when the US population is radicalizing, it is useful to draw collective inspiration from the past.

The post Are American Workers Really Allergic to Socialism? appeared first on Truthout.

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Baltimore Reckons with Its Racist Past—and Present 22.8.2018 American Prospect
(AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana) Demonstrators protest outside of the courthouse in Baltimore after a mistrial was declared in the manslaughter trial of Officer William Porter, one of six Baltimore city police officers charged in connection to the death of Freddie Gray, on December 16, 2015. Just over a century ago, in 1911, the Baltimore city council adopted the first residential segregation law in the country, forbidding black people from living in predominantly white neighborhoods. Though the Supreme Court ruled such policies unconstitutional seven years later, the consequences of the law, as well as the consequences of subsequent racist policies and practices like redlining , the displacement of black families, and mass incarceration remain. Today, Baltimore is one of the most segregated cities in the nation, where black residents make up a majority of the population but do worse than the average black American—and far worse than the average white Baltimore resident—on almost every measure of general ...
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How SNAP and Medicaid Work Requirements Will Hurt Workers 2.8.2018 American Prospect
trickle-downers.jpg On any given day, you’re likely to interact with a lot of people who work in the low-wage labor market. They’re the laborers you pass on the street, the retail clerks in a shop you frequent, the cooks or wait staff at a restaurant you like. They might be your family, friends, and coworkers. Maybe you yourself work in one of these occupations—after all, many millions of Americans do. While conservatives might paint adults who receive Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, commonly called food stamps) benefits and Medicaid as idle people who don’t want to work, the data don’t validate that assumption. Adults who rely on SNAP and Medicaid for help paying for their groceries and health care are often those same low-wage workers. But their work is largely volatile and unstable, and it comes without such key work supports as paid sick and family leave and affordable child care. That’s why the recent policy push to institute harsh work requirements in both SNAP and Medicaid is ...
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Attacking Income Inequality by Limiting Wealth 22.7.2018 Truthout.com
Redistribution is not enough; we need an economy that generates less inequality in the first place.

The post Attacking Income Inequality by Limiting Wealth appeared first on Truthout.

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DC Council Should Listen to Voters Who Want to Raise Wages for Tipped Workers 21.7.2018 Truthout.com
Even with tips, a minimum wage of $3.89 isn’t enough to live on.

The post DC Council Should Listen to Voters Who Want to Raise Wages for Tipped Workers appeared first on Truthout.

Can a Cap Be Placed on the Incomes of the Super-Rich? 19.7.2018 Truthout.com
The following is an excerpt from Sam Pizzigati's "The Case for a Maximum Wage."

The post Can a Cap Be Placed on the Incomes of the Super-Rich? appeared first on Truthout.

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National Insecurity in the United States of Inequality 16.7.2018 Truthout.com
It's time to rethink the American national security state with its annual trillion-dollar budget.

The post National Insecurity in the United States of Inequality appeared first on Truthout.

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With Anti-China Protectionism, the Left Is Aiding Trump’s Xenophobic Agenda 15.7.2018 Truthout.com
Even leading progressives like Bernie Sanders can fall short of full-throated solidarity with Chinese workers.

The post With Anti-China Protectionism, the Left Is Aiding Trump’s Xenophobic Agenda appeared first on Truthout.

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