User: newstrust Topic: US
Category: Education :: Education Reform
Last updated: Apr 24 2014 24:54 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Teaching unions aren't the problem universities are | Nick Gibb 23.4.2014 Guardian: Comment is Free
As an ex-schools minister I see value in the unions. But they are wrong not to join our battle against progressive educationalists This might seem like an odd thing for a Conservative MP and former schools minister to say, but teaching unions are not the problem with our schools . The vast majority of teachers who join one of the six teaching unions do so for the legal protection that most offer their members if they find themselves accused of some form of misconduct. And who can blame teaching unions for demanding better pay and conditions for their members? We need a well-rewarded teaching profession that is able to compete with the accountancy and legal professions for the best graduates. In my view, however, the unions are wrong in their approach to the reforms the coalition government is making to the profession. They are wrong to oppose the changes to teachers' pensions , reforms necessitated by longer life expectancy and escalating costs to the taxpayer and which still leave teachers with a ...
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Jim Crow in the Classroom: New Report Finds Segregation Lives on in US Schools 23.4.2014 Truthout.com
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What is the legacy of the Education Act, 70 years on? 22.4.2014 The Guardian -- Front Page
Rab Butler's 1944 reforms gave teachers autonomy but schools' freedom today comes with strings attached In March 1943, Rab Butler, the young president of the Board of Education, went to Chequers to see Winston Churchill. After a weekend of playing bagatelle, dining and watching films of Tsarist Russia, Butler found a moment alone with him. The meeting with Churchill leaning back on his pillows in a four-poster bed, night-cap on and with a large cat at his feet was an unlikely beginning for the most fundamental reform of the English education system, but that night the prime minister signed off on what became the 1944 Education Act. Conceived during the Blitz and the Normandy landings, it is remarkable to think that civil servants and ministers were focused on post-war reconstruction in order to build, as they saw it, the new Jerusalem. Churchill, in one of his inimitable radio broadcasts to the nation, described the Act as "the greatest scheme of improved education that has ever been attempted by a ...
Neel Kashkari proposes major education overhaul 22.4.2014 LA Times: Top News
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Minnesota: Persevere, Teach for America, persevere: Pioneer Press editorial 17.4.2014 Twincities.com: Opinion

We've followed the Minnesota ups and downs of Teach for America, the nonprofit that recruits best-and-brightest college graduates to serve in classrooms where needs are greatest.

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Is New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez the Next Sarah Palin? 16.4.2014 Mother Jones
Illustration: Dale Stephanos As she likes to tell anybody who'll listen, Susana Martinez, the governor of New Mexico, didn't start out a Republican. She and her husband, Chuck, like most everyone else in Las Cruces, had always been Democrats. But she'd long dreamed of running for office, and when word got out that she had her eyes on the district attorney's seat, two local Republican activists asked her to lunch. At the meeting, the story goes, her suitors didn't talk about party affiliation or ideology. They zeroed in on issues—taxes, welfare, gun rights, the death penalty. Afterward, Martinez got into the car, turned to her husband, and said, "I'll be damned, we're Republicans." It's a tidy little anecdote, and Martinez has put it to good use. During her prime-time speech at the 2012 Republican National Convention, the biggest stage of her 18-year political career, the I'll be damned punch line brought the crowd to its feet, getting more cheers than anything said by the party's presidential nominee, ...
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Parental school involvement? No big help 15.4.2014 Minnesota Public Radio: News
A couple of sociologists are causing big waves with their New York Times column that asserts what more than a few of us find hard to believe: Parental involvement in the lives of their children doesn't make that much of a difference.
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Poll shows opposition to education reforms 14.4.2014 The Guardian -- Front Page
Majority say councils should keep responsibilities over schools and that teaching profession requires dedicated training

Teaching unions assembling for their annual Easter conferences will be emboldened by the results of the Guardian/ICM poll suggesting strong public opposition to planks of Michael Gove's education reforms.

The biggest single structural change to English education since the coalition came to power has been the rapid conversion of secondary schools into semi-independent academies. There has been relatively little opposition at Westminster, not least because New Labour first invented the schools which are autonomous from local authorities while being funded through private contracts.

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The Hidden Price Of Drug-Free Zones 14.4.2014 Think Progres

Why a drug offense in the city has bigger consequences that the same crime in the suburbs.

The post The Hidden Price Of Drug-Free Zones appeared first on ThinkProgress.

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Editorial: An update on the charter school assault 14.4.2014 Chicago Tribune: Opinion
Lawmakers still bent on stifling innovation There's a faction in Springfield bent on crushing the charter school movement here, even as that movement flourishes in other ...
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Montessori charter school eyes 2015-16 implementation 14.4.2014 Steamboat Pilot
It has been nearly one full school year since the Steamboat Springs School District stopped offering a first- through fifth-grade Montessori program entirely, but a group of parents is leading a charge to reopen Montessori classrooms and expand the area’s educational opportunities. The summer before the 2013-14 school year, the district closed its Montessori program in first- through third-grade classrooms, just a year after it canceled its fourth- and fifth-grade program. The district’s longtime lead Montessori teacher left for another job at the start of the 2011-12 school year, and a steady and debilitating decline in enrollment followed. But talks before the 2013-14 year about reviving the district’s Montessori program have turned into action as of late. It’s been only a month, parent Kristen Rockford said, but the group is taking action toward a Montessori charter school, possibly as soon as the 2015-16 school year. “We are definitely in the infancy of this effort,” Rockford said. “In fact, what we ...
D.C. school proposals trigger debate over future of neighborhood schools 13.4.2014 Washington Post

Mayor Vincent C. Gray’s proposals to overhaul the District’s school boundaries and the policies that decide how students are assigned to schools are bound in a book. It is hefty with maps and charts and — to the casual observer — inscrutable permutations of set-asides, choice sets and feeder patterns.

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Mercury News editorial: Charter school battle in San Jose a sign of tough road ahead 12.4.2014 San Jose Mercury News: Editorials
The decision to halt plans for a middle school at Washington Elementary was probably the right one for now to avoid controversy. But it's emblematic of the sometimes brutal battles between charter school supporters and opponents, something many Silicon Valley districts will have to deal with more effectively in coming years.
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Ohio Republicans trying to prevent college athletes from unionizing 11.4.2014 NewsTrust Yahoo Pipes Feed
Republicans are always all about markets and free choice right up until they're not, and the moment they're not somehow always turns out to be about workers choosing to join together to get more from their employers, or women exercising control over their own bodies. So it's not a big surprise that Ohio Republicans are trying to prevent athletes at state colleges and universities from unionizing. Northwestern University is currently appealing a National Labor Relations Board decision that its football players are employees who are eligible to unionize. That decision would only apply to private universities, though, so the Ohio legislature is trying to be proactive about keeping the state's college athletes fully exploitable: An Ohio House committee added an amendment to a state budget bill Monday that says students attending state universities in Ohio "are not public employees based upon participating in athletics for the state university." If passed, this wouldn't be binding; this question isn't up to ...
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Fairfax program seeks to close the ‘excellence gap’ 11.4.2014 Washington Post

Sixteen-year-old Carolina Sosa grabs one end of a scrolled piece of white card stock and gives the other end to her mom. Standing in the dining room of their Centreville home, they are both grinning broadly as they unfurl an oversize check for $1,000, the winnings of a 2012 essay contest on Hispanic heritage.

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Economics Daily Digest: Do universities make the grade on local impact? 11.4.2014 Daily Kos
By Rachel Goldfarb, originally published on Next New Deal Click here to receive the Daily Digest via email. What's the Deal: How Can We Grade Universities On Their Local Economic Impact? ( YouTube ) Roosevelt Institute Associate Director of Networked Initiatives Alan Smith and NYU student Eugenia Kim explain the Campus Network's Rethinking Communities Initiative and how universities can promote local development. Roosevelt Take: Alan explains some of the theory behind this initiative. Don't Be Fooled: The Fed's New Rule Lets Banks Off Easy ( TNR ) Roosevelt Institute Fellow Mike Konczal says that increased leverage ratio requirements aren't the end-all solution to Too Big To Fail, even though they are a strong regulatory tool. Does Christianity Really Prefer Charity to Government Welfare? ( The Week ) Elizabeth Stoker agrees with Mike Konczal: the social safety net allows private charities to function better. She also argues for the safety net from a Christian perspective. Roosevelt Take: Stoker's piece ...
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Clintons name first participants for June Global Initiative in Denver 10.4.2014 Headlines: All Headlines
President Clinton and his family on Thursday announced some of top thinkers and the problems they will tackle during June's Clinton Global Initiative America session in Denver.
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School-budget proposal clears legislative hurdle (Cached) 10.4.2014 Durango Herald
DENVER x2013 A 500 million package to start refilling Colorado school budgets decimated during the last recession cleared a major hurdle Wednesday in the state Legislature.The two bills awaiting a final vote in the Colorado House aim to use the statex2019s improving tax collections to backfill K-12 school budgets. The measures...
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Construction firms worried about worker shortage 9.4.2014 Salt Lake Tribune
Denver • The construction industry says it’s in danger of running short on workers to keep up with the demand for building projects, as employees age and more teens are pushed to go to college. To counter the effect, a top construction trade group kicked off an effort Tuesday to help bolster the employment ranks. The plan by the Associated General Contractors of America, which represents 30,000 companies, aims to draw more people into building trades by establishing charter schools focused on t...
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After laying off 2M during recession, builders worried about shortage of construction workers 9.4.2014 Star Tribune: Business
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