User: newstrust Topic: Personal Finance
Category: Unemployment
Last updated: Oct 21 2017 07:57 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 19,513    
Yellen says Fed's extraordinary policies may be needed again 21.10.2017 AP Business
WASHINGTON (AP) -- Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen on Friday defended the central bank's extraordinary efforts to fight the Great Recession and said they might be needed again....
Also found in: [+]
Trump could upend decades of stability at Federal Reserve as he decides on its next leader 21.10.2017 Washington Post
The president is considering two fierce critics of current Fed Chair Janet Yellen. Both candidates have spent years attacking the Fed's approach to keeping interest rates low in hopes of stimulating the economy.
Also found in: [+]
Wages Are Growing, Contrary to What You Read in the Papers 16.10.2017 Truthout - All Articles
(Photo: Antonin ; Edited: LW/ TO)   This Truthout original was only possible because of our readers' ongoing support. Can you make a monthly donation to ensure we can publish more like it? Click here to give. There is much to criticize about the US economy. There has been a massive upward redistribution of income over the last four decades. As a result, those at the top have gotten incredibly rich while the middle and bottom have seen almost nothing from the growth over this period. The recent past has been even worse. Millions of people lost their homes in the collapse of the bubble, pushing the ownership rate to the lowest level in more than fifty years. For African Americans the ownership rate fell to the lowest level on record. The Great Recession pushed the unemployment rate into the double digits, with the unemployment rate for African Americans exceeding 17 percent at its peak. The recovery has been long and slow. While the unemployment rate has finally fallen back to pre-recession levels, the ...
Also found in: [+]
Wages Are Growing: Contrary to What You Read in the Papers 16.10.2017 Truthout - All Articles
(Photo: Antonin ; Edited: LW/ TO)   This Truthout original was only possible because of our readers' ongoing support. Can you make a monthly donation to ensure we can publish more like it? Click here to give. There is much to criticize about the US economy. There has been a massive upward redistribution of income over the last four decades. As a result, those at the top have gotten incredibly rich while the middle and bottom have seen almost nothing from the growth over this period. The recent past has been even worse. Millions of people lost their homes in the collapse of the bubble, pushing the ownership rate to the lowest level in more than fifty years. For African Americans the ownership rate fell to the lowest level on record. The Great Recession pushed the unemployment rate into the double digits, with the unemployment rate for African Americans exceeding 17 percent at its peak. The recovery has been long and slow. While the unemployment rate has finally fallen back to pre-recession levels, the ...
Also found in: [+]
Why Ben Bernanke is worried 16.10.2017 Washington Post: Op-Eds
We may be reaching the limits of the Fed’s power over the economy.
Also found in: [+]
Kevin Warsh as Fed Chair: The Art of Marrying Rich and Falling Upward 9.10.2017 Truthout.com
Central bank deputy governor Kevin Warsh (Left), US Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner (Center) and EU Finance Minister Elena Salgado (Right) attend during the photo session befire their meeting the the G20 Financial Ministers and Central Governors meeting at Paradise Hotel on June 4, 2010, in Busan, South Korea. (Photo: Chung Sung-Jun / Getty Images) Since the dawn of time men have married into prominent families as a way to improve their career prospects, but as Jared Kushner can attest, the returns to marrying well have never been greater. We may see further proof of this proposition if Donald Trump selects Kevin Warsh to replace Janet Yellen as chair of the Federal Reserve Board. Like Kushner, Warsh's secret to success seems to rest largely on the family he married into. Warsh's father-in-law is the billionaire Ronald Lauder, the heir to the Estee Lauder cosmetics fortune and a major Republican Party donor. If Warsh were picked his background would provide a sharp contrast to that of Janet Yellen. ...
Also found in: [+]
Job Creation Declines In September In Report Likely Impacted By Hurricanes 6.10.2017 Outside the Beltway
A very weak jobs report thanks mostly to the impact of two Category 5 hurricanes.
Also found in: [+]
Low Unemployment Doesn't Increase Wages Like It Used To 4.10.2017 American Prospect
AP Photo/John Minchillo Globalization, Contingent Employment, Non-Compete Clauses, and Now This: A robot works alongside a human, Virginia Beach, 2017.  This article appears in the Fall 2017 issue of The American Prospect magazine. Subscribe here .  On the first Friday of every month, the Labor Department releases the latest numbers on employment and wages. Here’s a sampling of recent headlines from the mornings after, which have remained remarkably unchanged month after month: “The Job Market Is Strong, but Wages for Americans Have Barely Rebounded” (The Washington Post, May), “Jobs Aplenty, but Wages Stagnate” (The Wall Street Journal, June), “Payrolls Expand, Even as Pay Lags” (The New York Times, July), “US Jobs Growth Rebounds but Wages Disappoint” (Financial Times, July). Those “buts” (and the one “even as”) are a shorthand expression of both common sense and the consensus among virtually every school of economic thought: In a market economy, as unemployment falls and unoccupied workers grow ...
Also found in: [+]
"Without Investment, People of Color Never Will Be Able to Catch Up" 2.10.2017 Truthout - All Articles
For the country as a whole, no one has recovered in terms of wealth from where they were before the Great Recession. African-Americans and Latinos make about 60 cents on every dollar that whites make -- but in terms of wealth, the disparity is much greater. Wealth and income inequality for people of color is written into the structure of the US economy. Will it ever change?  (Photo: Thomas Barwick / Getty Images / DigitalVision) Janine Jackson: The lead of the Washington Post story reads: The incomes of middle-class Americans rose last year to the highest level ever recorded by the Census Bureau, as poverty declined and the scars of the past decade's Great Recession seemed to finally fade. The piece ends with a source's comment that this is "unambiguously good news." Somewhere in between, you might catch the notes that "inequality remains high" and "yawning racial disparities remain," but the story's framing encourages you to see those as asterisks. Much media coverage presents the economic well-being of ...
Also found in: [+]
Here’s the single, best thing Trump could do for the U.S. economy 2.10.2017 Washington Post: Op-Eds
A steady-as-she-goes decision to reappoint Yellen would be pro-growth.
Also found in: [+]
Obama’s Final Numbers 29.9.2017 FactCheck

The numbers are nearly all in now. What they show about what really happened during the eight years that Barack Obama was president is sometimes different from what politicians claimed.

The post Obama’s Final Numbers appeared first on FactCheck.org.

Also found in: [+]
France and Germany: An Aging Couple Carries On 22.9.2017 American Prospect
This article appears in the Fall 2017 issue of The American Prospect magazine. Subscribe here .  It has been a torpid summer in Europe. Five hundred eighty people died in France in a freakish June heat wave, and Corsica recorded historic high temperatures in August. Yet the political climate has cooled noticeably since the previous winter of discontent. Last winter, it seemed possible that the far right could sweep to power in France, while Germany’s hitherto invincible chancellor Angela Merkel appeared to be facing a serious challenge from a resurgent Social Democratic Party (SPD) led by Martin Schulz. The Brexit vote of June 2016 had also put Europeans on edge. With Britain on the way out of the European Union, the election of a vociferously anti-EU party like France’s Front National might well spell the end of the European project. And then there was the stunning news from across the pond. The United States had elected Donald Trump, from whose incorrigibly loose lips fell the assertions that NATO was ...
Also found in: [+]
Trump’s U.N. Speech 20.9.2017 FactCheck

The president made misleading boasts about his record on the economy and foreign issues.

The post Trump’s U.N. Speech appeared first on FactCheck.org.

Also found in: [+]
Janet Yellen and the Fed: Progressives Should Pay Attention 18.9.2017 Truthout.com
Janet Yellen speaks at the University of Michigan on April 10, 2017, in Ann Arbor, Michigan. (Photo: Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, University of Michigan ) Many people think of the Federal Reserve Board as an obscure and esoteric institution that only those concerned about finance need concern themselves with. Nothing could be further from the truth. The Fed's ability to set interest rate policy directly affects the rate of growth in the economy and therefore the rate of job creation. This in turn affects the tightness of the labor market, which determines the extent to which workers have the bargaining power to achieve wage gains. The basic story is that when the Fed raises its short-term interest rate it puts upward pressure on interest rates throughout the economy. It means higher interest rates on mortgages and car loans, on student loan and credit card debt. It also means that companies have to pay more money to borrow as do state and local governments. The result of higher interest rates ...
Also found in: [+]
Fewer on Food Stamps, but Hunger Persists 15.9.2017 American Prospect
AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews Fears of deportation have deterred many undocumented immigrants, including Rose, and her children Egard and Olga, from using food stamps.  Although some regions of the country are still reeling from the Great Recession, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) participation has been steadily falling. And recently, the decline in SNAP recipients has been particularly dramatic—the number of individuals reliant on SNAP (also known as food stamps) fell by more than two million people between June 2016 and June 2017. The best explanation for this drop-off is that the economy is finally improving , and former SNAP recipients have found jobs that push their incomes over the SNAP income eligibility limits. But a recovering economy may not be the only factor contributing to this decline. There are two others to consider. The strict time limit on benefits that targets the unemployed has forced people off the program. The recent immigration crackdown also has heightened fears that ...
Also found in: [+]
The growing black-white wage gap is unexplained — and scary 13.9.2017 Washington Post: Op-Eds
A new study examines five possible explanations.
Also found in: [+]
Middle-class incomes rise, but Census report shows worrying disparities 13.9.2017 Washington Post
Median household income rose to $59,039 in 2016, a 3.2 percent increase from the previous year. Yet the Census Bureau report also points to the sources of deeper anxieties among U.S. workers. Middle-class households are only now seeing their income eclipse 1999 levels. Inequality remains high, with the top fifth of earners taking home more than half of all overall income, a record.
Also found in: [+]
Poor, middle class saw solid gains last year, but we’ll need better policy to keep it going 12.9.2017 Washington Post
Poor, middle class saw solid gains last year, but we’ll need better policy to keep it going
Also found in: [+]
Two inflation puzzles, one inflation monster 11.9.2017 Washington Post
Two inflation puzzles, one inflation monster
Also found in: [+]
Colorado Divide: As pressures mount for Colorado farmers, state pushes crisis hotline into remote, sometimes skeptical communities 8.9.2017 Denver Post: Business
After several years of historically low commodity prices, farmers across Colorado are facing financial pressures reminiscent of the 1980s. What’s more, farmers are growing older, and fewer young people are entering the field. Selling the family farm is no longer unthinkable. Colorado has responded by extending a crisis hotline to rural areas.
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 19,513