User: newstrust Topic: NewsTrust Environment
Category: Biodiversity :: Endangered Species
Last updated: Jan 17 2019 18:10 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 13,313    
Romeo and Juliet: the last hopes to save Bolivian aquatic frog 17.1.2019 Raw Story

Almost a year after conservationists sent out a plea to help save a species of Bolivian aquatic frog by finding a mate for the last remaining member, Romeo, his very own Juliet has been tracked down deep inside a cloud forest. Not only did the wildlife conservation team return with a potential mate ...

The post Romeo and Juliet: the last hopes to save Bolivian aquatic frog appeared first on Raw Story.

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Trump’s Wilderness Deal Will Decimate the “Most Important Wildlife Refuge in All of Alaska” 14.1.2019 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by Reveal. It appears here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. COLD BAY, Alaska—At the spot where a rugged chain of islands breaks away from the Alaska Peninsula, a secluded national refuge protects millions of seabirds, grizzly bears and caribou. Framed by snow-capped mountains and smoky volcanoes, the refuge holds an irreplaceable underwater […]
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The Biggest Issues for Wildlife and Endangered Species in 2019 13.1.2019 Truthout.com
Experts warn that the opportunity to make a difference on conservation is already running short.

The post The Biggest Issues for Wildlife and Endangered Species in 2019 appeared first on Truthout.

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The curious excuses House Republicans are giving for refusing to end Trump’s shutdown 11.1.2019 The Atlantic - Matthew Ygblesias
House Republicans are offering a series of strange justifications for refusing to join their Democratic colleagues in supporting legislation that would end President Trump’s government shutdown, which is about to set a record as the longest ever. Democrats passed a series of bills this week to reopen parts of the federal government that are currently […]
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The politics of fear: How fear goes tribal, allowing us to be manipulated 11.1.2019 Raw Story

Fear is arguably as old as life. It is deeply ingrained in the living organisms that have survived extinction through billions of years of evolution. Its roots are deep in our core psychological and biological being, and it is one of our most intimate feelings. Danger and war are as old as human his...

The post The politics of fear: How fear goes tribal, allowing us to be manipulated appeared first on Raw Story.

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Trump Administration Gifts the World Shutdown, Drilling and Coal 7.1.2019 Truthout.com
The government shutdown, and several other actions by the administration, could have long-lasting environmental effects.

The post Trump Administration Gifts the World Shutdown, Drilling and Coal appeared first on Truthout.

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We Already Have a Border Wall. It’s an Environmental Disaster. 6.1.2019 Truthout.com
The walls and fences that already exist along the border are causing environmental damage and hurting communities.

The post We Already Have a Border Wall. It’s an Environmental Disaster. appeared first on Truthout.

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Former Park Service Chief Says Keeping National Parks Open During the Shutdown Is a Tragic Mistake 6.1.2019 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by the Guardian. It appears here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. When I was a ranger at Crater Lake national park in the 1980s, the average snowfall at headquarters was 500 inches a year, and snow could accumulate at 2 inches an hour. One of my jobs as ranger was to shovel […]
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Where to see bald eagles during their annual winter visit to Colorado 4.1.2019 Denver Post: News: Local
We have a few suggestions on established spots to look for bald eagles, followed by some general tips on finding them on your own.
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Japan should join the overwhelming majority of the world and stop whaling altogether 3.1.2019 Los Angeles Times - Living Green

Gone are the days when the great whales were hunted across the globe. A worldwide moratorium on commercial whaling that went into effect 33 years ago has mostly put an end to the practice, reviving the numbers and prospects of the majestic sea creatures — although some whale species are still considered...

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Ryan Zinke’s Real Legacy Is Rolling Back Environmental Protections and Cozying Up to Big Oil 2.1.2019 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by HuffPost. It appears here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. The question was about climate change—the man-made global crisis that Ryan Zinke, as a Montana state senator, once urged President Barack Obama to take action on, but in recent years has become willfully blasé about. “It appears that the world is laughing at […]
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Environmentalists made a troubling deal with Tejon Ranch 2.1.2019 Los Angeles Times - Living Green

As I turned a corner, the animal was suddenly right there in all its furious glory, hissing a warning and baring its teeth. It was the first badger I’d ever seen, and I beat a hasty retreat. But after that close encounter at Tejon Ranch 30 years ago, I watched from a distance, fascinated by this...

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What the Trump administration doesn’t want you to know about this fancy bird 31.12.2018 Raw Story

2018 may be coming to a close, but the federal government’s environmental hijinks are far from over. A recent investigation found that this past spring, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) deleted web pages containing information about the sage grouse, a species native to the American West and parts...

The post What the Trump administration doesn’t want you to know about this fancy bird appeared first on Raw Story.

Exploding Ants, Rainbow Slugs, and Tiny Seahorses: 11 New Species Discovered This Year 30.12.2018 Mother Jones
Considering there are nearly eight billion people on Earth, and that more and more species are being pushed into extinction by climate change, habitat destruction, and pollution, it may seem like there would be few species left for humans to discover. In fact, there could be up to a trillion species on the planet, 99.999 percent of which have yet to […]
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How Worried Should We Be About Declining Insect Populations? 28.12.2018 Truthout.com
The real story of an “insect Armageddon" is nuanced, but unsettling.

The post How Worried Should We Be About Declining Insect Populations? appeared first on Truthout.

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45 Years After Nixon Signed It Into Law, the War on the Endangered Species Act Continues 28.12.2018 Mother Jones
Forty-five years ago, on December 28th, 1973, President Richard Nixon, a Republican, signed a piece of monumental environmental legislation, the Endangered Species Act, into law. At the time, Nixon issued a statement in support of protecting wildlife that most sitting Republicans wouldn’t dare make today: “Nothing is more priceless and more worthy of preservation than […]
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Listening to nature: How sound can help us understand environmental change 28.12.2018 The Moderate Voice

Imagine this with a sound track – sunset near Turtle Rock, Joshua Tree National Park. NPS / Hannah Schwalbe Garth Paine, Arizona State University Our hearing tells us of a car approaching from behind, unseen, or a bird in a distant forest. Everything vibrates, and sound passes through and around us all the time. Sound […]

The post Listening to nature: How sound can help us understand environmental change appeared first on The Moderate Voice.

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We Need to Talk About Palm Oil 27.12.2018 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by HuffPost. It appears here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. We wash our hair with it, brush our teeth with it, smother our skin in it and use it to powder our cheeks, plump our lashes and color our lips. We clean our houses with it, fuel our cars with it and […]
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Looking Back on Ryan Zinke’s Reign Over 500 Million Acres of Public Land 26.12.2018 Mother Jones
Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, who is departing Jan. 2 amid multiple ethics investigations, leaves a legacy of widespread attacks on science. Zinke was in charge of balancing protection of national parks, endangered species, waterways and other resources with public uses on 500 million acres of public land. Here are six ways Zinke rejected or impeded science during his […]
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Tiny salamander in Northern California could spell big problem for plans to heighten the Shasta Dam 26.12.2018 LA Times: Commentary

A trio of tiny salamander species could mean big trouble for federal officials spearheading a controversial $1.4-billion public works project to heighten the Shasta Dam in Northern California.

Two environmental organizations — the Center for Biological Diversity and the Environmental Protection...

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