User: newstrust Topic: NewsTrust Environment
Category: Biodiversity :: Species Loss
Last updated: Feb 23 2018 04:07 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 6,318    
The Trump Administration Just Got Sued Over an “Unusual Mortality Event” in the Ocean 23.2.2018 Mother Jones
On January 22, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration got word of a juvenile, North Atlantic right whale carcass floating off the coast of Virginia. Later identified as whale #3893, the 39-foot, 10-year-old female was towed to shore, where researchers examined her partially-decomposed remains. A few days later, preliminary necropsy findings indicated that the whale […]
Also found in: [+]
25-year experiment suggests climate change in the Rockies will lead common Colorado wildflower to extinction 22.2.2018 Denver Post: Local
Creamy jasmine wildflowers once common in the Colorado high country may be vanishing as climate change brings warmer and drier conditions.
Also found in: [+]
How Did an All-Female Species Survive Sans Sexual Reproduction for Millennia? 19.2.2018 The Wire

By all means, the Amazon molly should have gone extinct by now. Except it has not.

The post How Did an All-Female Species Survive Sans Sexual Reproduction for Millennia? appeared first on The Wire.

Also found in: [+]
U.S. efforts once saved the red wolf. But missteps may push the species back to the brink. 11.2.2018 Washington Post
Three decades after they were reintroduced to the wild, there is serious doubt that the species can survive outside zoos. The story of the rise and fall of the red wolf population at a North Carolina refuge is a testament to the power of the Endangered Species Act to protect wildlife — and its limitations.
Also found in: [+]
That dinosaur-killing asteroid also triggered massive magma releases beneath the ocean, study finds 8.2.2018 LA Times: Science

The asteroid that hit Earth 66 million years ago appears to have caused huge amounts of magma to spew out of the bottom of the ocean, a new study of seafloor data finds.

The discovery, described in the journal Science Advances, adds to the portrait of an extinction event that was as complex as...

Also found in: [+]
Despite burst of January snow, Colorado mountain snowpack stays grim — with record low levels at some sites 7.2.2018 Denver Post: Local
Colorado mountain snowpack bounced back a bit in January but remains exceptionally low, with the overall statewide average at 59 percent of the norm, and water suppliers say they’re increasingly anxious about prospects for drought.
Also found in: [+]
Red wolves may be going extinct in the wild — again 6.2.2018 Washington Post
Red wolves may be going extinct in the wild — again
Also found in: [+]
Study: Mammals May Be Better Equipped to Adapt to Climate Change 3.2.2018 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by Project Earth/Fusion and appears here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.  The story of the tortoise and the hare teaches us that slow and steady wins the race. But when it comes to adapting to changing environmental conditions, Aesop (the ancient Greek storyteller credited with the fable) isn’t quite on the money. […]
Also found in: [+]
One of the world's rarest fish is a little less rare than we thought 26.1.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: News
The red handfish, named for hand-shaped fins on the sides of its body, doesn't really swim -- it walks slowly along the seafloor. A new population of the striking creature has been found off Tasmania.
Also found in: [+]
A spider that hunts other spiders: 18 new species of this bizarre Madagascar arachnid are unveiled 26.1.2018 LA Times: Commentary
Scientists have identified 18 new species of pelcian spider. Also called assassin spiders, these critters hunt other arachnids using their long fang-tipped "jaws" to impale their prey.
Also found in: [+]
Why you’re still hungry: 6 obstacles to healthy eating 23.1.2018 Washington Post
Why you’re still hungry: 6 obstacles to healthy eating
Also found in: [+]
Strange weather triggered bacteria that killed 200,000 endangered antelope 18.1.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Over a three-week span in 2015, more than 200,000 saiga antelope suddenly died in Kazakhstan. The animals would be grazing normally, then dead in three hours. A new study points to heat and humidity.
Also found in: [+]
California Is Preparing to Defend Its Waters From Trump Order 12.1.2018 Truthout - All Articles
In its first act to shield California from the Trump administration's repeal of regulations, the state's water board has prepared its own rules protecting wetlands and other waters. The proposed new rules could insulate the state from President Donald Trump's executive order to roll back the reach of the Clean Water Act. Landscapes from Point Reyes National Seashore, a stretch of federally protected Pacific Ocean coastline, on July 6, 2017, outside of the town of Inverness, California. (Photo: Andrew Lichtenstein / Corbis via Getty Images)   Ready to make a difference? Help Truthout provide a platform for exposing injustice and inspiring action. Click here to make a one-time or monthly donation. This story was originally published by Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting, a nonprofit news organization based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Learn more at  revealnews.org  and subscribe to the Reveal podcast, produced with PRX, at  revealnews.org/podcast . In its first act to shield California ...
Also found in: [+]
The Daily 202: Trump has no nominees for 245 important jobs, including an ambassador to South Korea 12.1.2018 Washington Post: Politics
The president lags his predecessors in filling posts that make government work.
Also found in: [+]
Soon the Only Coral Reefs We See Will Be on the Nature Channel 7.1.2018 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by Grist and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. For decades, marine scientists have been warning of the demise of coral reefs in a warming world. But now, those warning calls have reached a full-scale alarm, leaving researchers at a loss for exactly how best to save the reefs. […]
Also found in: [+]
When two different types of birds mated, a new species, Big Bird, was born 7.1.2018 Washington Post: World
Scientists studying interbreeding say such swift evolution may not be all that uncommon.
Also found in: [+]
The National Zoo gets the purrfect resident: A 310-pound tiger 6.1.2018 Washington Post
The National Zoo gets the purrfect resident: A 310-pound tiger
Also found in: [+]
The Delta Smelt heads for extinction, marking a half-century of failed California water policy 5.1.2018 LA Times: Commentary

You might wish you had as much power to affect the environment and the economy as the Delta Smelt.

Enemies have blamed the tiny freshwater fish for putting farmers out of business across California’s breadbasket, forcing the fallowing of vast acres of arable land, creating double-digit unemployment...

Also found in: [+]
Republicans’ attack on conservation law would shock their conservative predecessors 29.12.2017 Washington Post
Republicans’ attack on conservation law would shock their conservative predecessors
Also found in: [+]
How to Restore Our Relationship to Earth 27.12.2017 Truthout - All Articles
(Photo: 12019 / 10279 Images ; Edited: LW / TO) To have a viable human future on this overstressed planet, it is essential that we build a solidarity economy that seeks material sufficiency and spiritual abundance for all in balance with a living Earth. We must join in common cause to build local relationships of caring and equitable sharing across the lines of race, religion, and class. Strong and healthy local relationships, however, are only one element of the larger economic transformation required to rebalance our relationship to Earth and achieve a radical redistribution of access to and control of the essentials of living. Three key statistics reveal the current grim reality: 1. According to the Ecological Footprint Network, we humans currently consume at a rate 1.7 times what Earth's generative capacity can sustain -- and the gap is growing. Consumption at a rate above one further depletes Earth's capacity to support life. 2. According to Oxfam International, the financial assets of the world's ...
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 6,318