User: newstrust Topic: NewsTrust Environment
Category: Biodiversity :: Biodiversity
Last updated: Jul 19 2017 10:05 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 4,664    
Long-debated Newhall Ranch project gets key approvals from county 19.7.2017 LA Times: Commentary

After decades of controversy, the Newhall Ranch development in the Santa Clarita Valley cleared its last major hurdle Tuesday when county officials certified a revised environmental analysis and approved two of the project’s five planned subdivisions.

In two separate 4-0 votes, the Los Angeles...

Also found in: [+]
As Pruitt Guts Water Rules, EPA Will Allow Fracking Waste Dumping in the Gulf of Mexico 18.7.2017 Truthout.com
A fracking site is situated on the outskirts of town at dawn in the Permian Basin oil field on January 21, 2016, in the oil town of Midland, Texas. The EPA, under Scott Pruitt's leadership, wants to allow fracking waste in the Gulf of Mexico without understanding its impact on marine and human life. (Photo: Spencer Platt / Getty Images) As the Trump administration and Republicans in Congress move to gut Obama-era clean water protections, a draft permit that would allow offshore oil and gas platforms to dump fracking chemicals and drilling wastewater into the Gulf of Mexico reveals how challenging it can be to hold polluters to federal water standards. A fracking site is situated on the outskirts of town at dawn in the Permian Basin oil field on January 21, 2016, in the oil town of Midland, Texas. The EPA, under Scott Pruitt's leadership, wants to allow fracking waste in the Gulf of Mexico without understanding its impact on marine and human life. (Photo: Spencer Platt / Getty Images) With everything ...
Also found in: [+]
Idaho Fish and Game proposes allowing hunters to bait wolves 18.7.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Ketchum, Idaho • The Idaho Fish and Game Commission is considering several changes to hunting rules, including allowing the use of bait to hunt wolves. The department is proposing the rule change in response to requests from hunters who want to use bait for hunting wolves outside of the black bear seasons. Under current rules, wolves can be killed by hunters when they are attracted to bait set out for black bears, where hunting seasons are open for both black bear and wolf. But big game rules do... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
Also found in: [+]
Interior secretary ponders fate of Nat'l Monument in Oregon 18.7.2017 AP Washington
SALEM, Ore. (AP) -- After touring the &quot;unique&quot; Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument in Oregon and speaking to ranchers, loggers and environmentalists, U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke must next make a recommendation on whether it should be abolished or resized....
Also found in: [+]
US interior secretary to visit Cascade-Siskiyou monument 15.7.2017 AP Washington
SALEM, Ore. (AP) -- U.S. Secretary of Interior Ryan Zinke will be visiting the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument in Oregon this weekend as part of the review ordered by President Donald Trump of 27 national monuments established by three former presidents....
Also found in: [+]
Controversy, Questions Surround California's Listing of Weed Killer as Cancer Cause 14.7.2017 Truthout - All Articles
California's official listing of the world's most widely used weed killer as a known carcinogen marks a milestone in what has been years of debate over the safety of the pesticide called glyphosate. But it by no means marks the end of controversy over the chemical, or arguments over what warnings -- if any -- should be placed on an herbicide that is a mainstay for US farming and for maintaining household lawns and gardens, city parks and school grounds. Officials with California's Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) have until early April to work out guidelines for glyphosate product warnings before requirements for such warnings take effect in July 2018. At the same time, OEHHA continues to face a court challenge from Monsanto Co., which introduced glyphosate more than 40 years ago, and makes billions of dollars off glyphosate-based Roundup herbicides. The chemical, now off patent, is also active in hundreds of other herbicide products. "This is not the final step in the process... ...
Also found in: [+]
Denver’s Slow Food Nations: Your guide to this weekend’s sustainable street food festival 13.7.2017 Denver Post: News: Local
Half street food festival, half sustenance symposium, all food roads less traveled lead to Denver this weekend.
Also found in: [+]
Earth is on its way to the biggest mass extinction since the dinosaurs, study says 12.7.2017 Washington Post
The populations of nearly 9,000 vertebrate species, including mammals such as cheetahs, lions and giraffes, have significantly declined between 1900 and 2015, the study's authors said.
Also found in: [+]
Microsoft launches AI for Earth to give $2M in services to environmental projects 12.7.2017 TechCrunch
 After helping to launch the Partnership on AI with Google, Facebook and others; and doubling down on AI research, today Microsoft unveiled a new initiative that points to how it plans to target specific verticals in what can potentially be a very nebulous field — while also raising the public image of AI as some grow concerned about the implications of its encroaching influence. Today,… Read ...
Also found in: [+]
After Supreme Court victory, peat mine proposal's fate in DNR's hands 11.7.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Business
A site where Hawkes Company hopes to mine peat has been deemed to have high biodiversity significance, meaning it would need to restored to equivalent or better habitat.
Also found in: [+]
As Habitat Fragmentation Increases, So Does Extinction Risk 8.7.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Researchers have long assumed that when animals are left without large areas of intact habitat, they are at greater risk of extinction: fragmentation leaves animals confined to ever-smaller areas, restricting movement and gene flow and leaving species vulnerable to threats ranging from poachers to climate change. A  study published July 3  in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) set out to quantify this risk for more than 4,000 land-dwelling mammal species across the globe -- and found that species with more fragmented habitats were at greater risk of extinction. This link persisted even when researchers accounted for other factors including species' body size and overall range size. "We used statistical models that evaluated the relative contribution of fragmentation and geographic range size, as well as body size, on extinction risk," lead author Kevin Crooks, a professor in Colorado State University's Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology, told Mongabay by email. ...
Also found in: [+]
Why the Open Access Movement in Agriculture Matters 7.7.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Western discourse around open access has largely been restricted to academic, scholarly communications circles. In fact, many friends and colleagues have told me they first encountered open access when, after graduating from university, they were confronted with the fact they no longer had access to school databases; or when online article searches reached the dead-end prompt "click here to pay for access." The internet now provides a free platform for sharing knowledge. How is it possible -- or even socially just -- that so many of us can't get access to scholarly research? Isn't society propelled forward by access to the science, literature, and art of the world's scholars? What if that research is publically funded? These are the primary concerns that drive the open access movement. What would these concerns look like if we removed them from the scholarly communications circle and applied them to realms beyond the ivory tower like nature, society, technology, and ultimately the intersection of those ...
Also found in: [+]
Banks Have Cut Funding for Fossil Fuels Projects 22 Percent 7.7.2017 Truthout.com
While funding from banks for fossil fuel projects has declined, the truth behind the numbers isn't so rosy: it isn't enough to stop global climate change, and banks still invest in or lend money to fossil fuel companies. (Image: LW / TO; Adapted: Jon Feinstein ; Damien Gadal ) A new report from a consortium of environmental groups shows that big banks are reducing their investment in fossil fuel projects. While this is welcome news to the movement led by tribes to get  banks to divest from fossil fuels -- most notably  in response to the Dakota Access Pipeline -- the truth behind the numbers isn't so rosy: it isn't enough to stop global climate change, and banks still invest in or lend money to fossil fuel companies. "The financial industry needs to be held accountable for its fossil fuel financing and that takes a lot of forms," says Jason Disterhoft, a senior campaigner for Rainforest Action Network. "We need everybody to continue to work and make that happen." Banks still are funding fossil fuels at a ...
Also found in: [+]
Campesino Movements Say Climate Justice Is an Alternative to Devastating G20 Policies 5.7.2017 Truthout - All Articles
As our communities in the global South and North contend with the social and environmental impacts of market-oriented policies, the gathering of world leaders this week in Hamburg, Germany for the G20 does not raise many positive expectations. This is no surprise given that G20 countries currently dominate the world's economic governance -- together accounting for 85 percent of the global GDP, and their economic growth centered priorities have mostly translated to environmental destruction, social conflict and the exploitation of the poor majority. Because of this, grassroots social justice movements find it imperative to organize transnationally -- in addition to strategic work at the local level -- to bring the voice of rural communities from across the world to international forums. Doing so offers an alternative vision of life by linking the question of food production to those of power and democracy. With the revolutionary concept of Food Sovereignty on the forefront, the peasant women and men of La ...
Also found in: [+]
The Energy 202: What would be the point of Pruitt's "red team-blue team” climate exercise? 3.7.2017 Washington Post: Politics
The Trump administration is taking seriously a proposal to start a formal government-wide effort to challenge of the long-standing scientific consensus on climate change.
Also found in: [+]
Tree plantation drive launched 2.7.2017 Mumbai – The Indian Express
A new frontier for diamond mining: The ocean 2.7.2017 Washington Post: World
Off southern Africa, high-tech ships vacuum up diamonds from the seafloor.
Also found in: [+]
DOJ Withdraws Funding Request for Kentucky Prison on Mountaintop-Removal Site 30.6.2017 Truthout.com
Last month the US Department of Justice withdrew its request for funding for construction of a maximum-security prison atop a former mountaintop-removal coal-mining site in eastern Kentucky. The proposed $444 million facility, planned for Letcher County, has faced ongoing opposition from environmental and human rights organizations. A mountaintop removal site in eastern Kentucky. (Photo: iLoveMountains.org ) Last month the United States Department of Justice (DOJ) withdrew its request for funding for construction of a maximum-security prison atop a former mountaintop-removal coal-mining site in eastern Kentucky. The proposed $444 million facility , planned for Letcher County, has faced ongoing opposition from environmental and human rights organizations who have expressed a wide range of concerns about potential ecological and health impacts of the project. "Building this prison would have been terrible for the health of prisoners, the surrounding community and all the wildlife in the area," said Lori ...
Also found in: [+]
How to save seeds from your Colorado garden 30.6.2017 Denver Post: Lifestyles
Saving seeds moves a gardener one step closer to food security and self-reliance. But the act of trading little packages of seeds collected from a favorite plant also builds community among family and friends.
Also found in: [+]
Conservationists blast long-awaited recovery plan for Mexican wolves, which excludes Utah, Colorado from lobos’ range 30.6.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
As Utah officials had hoped, a draft federal plan for the recovery of the endangered Mexican gray wolf does not include Utah or Colorado in the area envisioned for the wolf’s range. Released Thursday after decades of delay, the proposal appears to deviate sharply from a draft five years ago, when U.S. Fish and Wildlife scientists considered including southern Utah. The small-bodied wolf species once roamed the American Southwest and northern Mexico. The earlier draft pegged the target for reco...
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 4,664