User: newstrust Topic: NewsTrust Environment
Category: Biodiversity :: Biodiversity
Last updated: Nov 22 2017 18:51 IST RSS 2.0
 
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We don’t need to save endangered species. Extinction is part of evolution. 22.11.2017 Washington Post: Op-Eds
The only creatures we should go out of our way to protect are Homo sapiens.
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The Energy 202: Keystone XL pipeline seems like a done deal for Trump. But it's not. 21.11.2017 Washington Post
The Energy 202: Keystone XL pipeline seems like a done deal for Trump. But it's not.
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Hunters are livid over Trump’s delaying of a decision to end the ban on elephant hunting trophies 21.11.2017 Washington Post
In voicing their indignation, hunters were careful not to blame the president. Instead, they faulted animal rights advocates, “hysterical anti-hunters and news media outlets.”
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After backlash, Trump says he will postpone plan to allow elephant trophy imports 18.11.2017 LA Times: Nation

In a surprise move, the Trump administration will suspend its recent decision to allow hunters to bring elephant trophies back to the U.S. from parts of southern Africa, President Trump announced Friday night on Twitter.

The move comes as celebrities, politicians and even some Trump supporters...

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Trump announces freeze on elephant trophy imports in tweet 18.11.2017 LA Times: Commentary
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Does trophy hunting 'enhance survival of the species'? Trump administration policy allowing elephant trophies stirs debate 17.11.2017 LA Times: Nation

Partially reversing an Obama-era ban, the Trump administration will now allow U.S. hunters to bring home the remains of elephants they’ve killed in Zimbabwe and Zambia in southern Africa.

The move, announced earlier this week, was greeted with cheers by hunters and firearms groups and but was derided...

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Billions or bust: New genetic clues to the extinction of the passenger pigeon 17.11.2017 Washington Post
Billions or bust: New genetic clues to the extinction of the passenger pigeon
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Does trophy hunting 'enhance survival of the species'? Trump administration policy allowing elephant trophies stirs debate 17.11.2017 LA Times: Nation

Partially reversing an Obama-era ban, the Trump administration will now allow U.S. hunters to bring home the remains of elephants they’ve killed in Zimbabwe and Zambia in southern Africa.

The move, announced earlier this week, was greeted with cheers by hunters and firearms groups and but was derided...

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Trump reverses ban on importing elephants killed as trophies 17.11.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: News
The change marks a shift in efforts to stop the importation of elephant tusks and hides, overriding a 2014 ban imposed by the Obama administration.
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Environmental group sues for records of wolf killings 15.11.2017 AP Washington
SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) -- An environmental group is suing the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife over its failure to release some public records on wolf deaths in the state....
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This endangered snail lives only in the L.A. area. Can the little creatures be saved? 14.11.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Before Los Angeles was developed, the San Gabriel chestnut snail was a common sight from Compton to the San Gabriel Mountains. But today, experts say, it survives only in the Angeles National Forest and on adjacent private lands between Glendora and Altadena after being threatened by development,...

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Over 15,000 Scientists Just Issued a "Second Notice" to Humanity. Can We Listen Now? 14.11.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Yikes. Over 15,000 scientists hailing from more than 180 countries just issued a dire  warning  to humanity: "Time is running out" to stop business as usual, as threats from rising greenhouse gases to biodiversity loss are pushing the biosphere to the brink. The new warning was published Monday in the international journal  BioScience , and marks an update to the "World Scientists' Warning to Humanity" issued by nearly 1,700 leading scientists 25 years ago. The 1992 plea, which said Earth was on track to be "irretrievably mutilated" baring "fundamental change," however, was largely unheeded. "Some people might be tempted to dismiss this evidence and think we are just being alarmist," said William Ripple, distinguished professor in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University, and lead author of the new warning. "Scientists are in the business of analyzing data and looking at the long-term consequences. Those who signed this second warning aren't just raising a false alarm. They are acknowledging ...
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US sage grouse policy heading back to square one 11.11.2017 AP Washington
SPARKS, Nev. (AP) -- Federal scientists and land managers who've been crafting strategies to protect a ground-dwelling bird's habitat across the American West for nearly two decades are going back to the drawing board under a new Trump administration edict to reassess existing plans condemned by ranchers, miners and energy developers....
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Your house is a gigantic bug habitat, and there's nothing you can do about it 11.11.2017 Washington Post
Your house is a gigantic bug habitat, and there's nothing you can do about it
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Dinosaurs would have survived if asteroid hit Earth elsewhere, scientists claim 9.11.2017 Washington Post
A research team argues that only a few locations on Earth could create soot clouds that killed the dinosaurs.
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Mexico says endangered vaquita porpoise died in captivity 6.11.2017 Washington Post: World
Researchers were thrilled to have captured one of the few remaining vaquita porpoises, but announced Sunday that the adult female died after a few hours in captivity in a floating pen, raising questions about the last-ditch effort to enclose the world’s smallest porpoises to save them from extinction.
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An Environmental and Public Health Disaster Awaits -- if USDA Gives Organic Label to Hydroponics 31.10.2017 Truthout.com
Choose journalism that empowers movements for social, environmental and economic justice: Support the independent media at Truthout! Whether food production entails acres of mono-crops, livestock shuttled through assembly lines or orderly tracks of plastic pipelines in factory-scale hydroponics spaces, streamlined production techniques tempt food producers to improve on nature, without necessarily assessing the long-term health or environmental costs. Even an apparently benign innovation, like hydroponics, may convey unexpected downsides. Despite each new agricultural novelty, 17 years after the  US Department of Agriculture  established the Organic Standards, earth-based farming remains the oldest and most proven method for cultivating organic food. A coalition of farmers, sustainability advocates and foodies wants to keep it that way. "If we want to protect the integrity of the organic seal, we will have to fight for it," says Lisa Stokke, founder of  Next7 , which has launched a campaign to raise ...
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Coal Burying Goa: All along the road route, the black dust settles 27.10.2017 Front Page – The Indian Express
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The Myth of the Managed Wildfire: How US Forest Service Policies Perpetuate Deadly Wildfires 26.10.2017 Truthout.com
The idea that wildfires can be controlled is a dangerous and costly myth, promoted in large part by the timber industry, which views wildfires as a waste of economic resources, not the forest's way of rejuvenating itself. Ecologically speaking, fighting wildfires makes about as much sense as fighting hurricanes, yet we spend nearly $3 billion annually on the effort. Tanker helicopters fight a wildfire on October 16, 2017, in Oakville, California. At least 40 people were killed with many are still missing, and at least 5,700 buildings have been destroyed since wildfires broke out a week ago. (Photo: Elijah Nouvelage / Getty Images) Research is clear  that the wildfires the US experienced this year are more widespread and increasingly intense as our climate heats up. Consistent with the US government's head-in-the-sand approach to the climate crisis generally, our national wildfire "management" policy flies in the face of science and reason. If we don't learn to adapt to climate change's growing coastal ...
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An ecologist speaks for the silent giants: Old-growth trees 24.10.2017 Washington Post
An ecologist speaks for the silent giants: Old-growth trees
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