User: newstrust Topic: NewsTrust Environment
Category: Biodiversity :: Conventions
Last updated: Sep 05 2014 23:45 IST RSS 2.0
 
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As Aircraft Emissions Skyrocket, EPA Looks Into Regulation For First Time 5.9.2014 Think Progres

The airline industry's carbon emissions may soon be regulated due to efforts from the Obama administration.

The post As Aircraft Emissions Skyrocket, EPA Looks Into Regulation For First Time appeared first on ThinkProgress.

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Feds Consider Ban On Bluefin Tuna Fishing As Population Dips 95 Percent 25.7.2014 Think Progres

On Wednesday, the fisheries division of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced that it's considering a ban on recreational and commercial fishing of Pacific bluefin tuna.

The post Feds Consider Ban On Bluefin Tuna Fishing As Population Dips 95 Percent appeared first on ThinkProgress.

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When Nature Gets a Price Tag 14.6.2014 Truthout.com
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When Nature Gets a Price Tag 14.6.2014 Truthout.com
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Indonesian indigenous groups fight climate change with GPS mapping 9.1.2014 Guardian: Environment
Tribal rights advocates and rainforest defenders are using community mapmaking to protect ancestral land Indigenous communities in Indonesia are using GPS technology to demarcate the boundaries of their ancestral lands, a move many believe could also help mitigate the negative effects of climate change. "Community mapmaking has been a successful tool to show the government that we are here, and that we want to protect our lands," says Rukka Sombolinggi, a spokeswoman for the Indigenous Peoples' Alliance of the Archipelago (Aman), a Jakarta-based secretariat representing more than 2,000 communities. Indonesia's dense forests are home to an estimated 50 million-70 million indigenous people, and 10% of all known plant species, according to Aman and the Rainforest Action Network , a non-profit international environmental advocacy group based in San Francisco. "Indonesia's forests are recognised as important, not only at local and national levels but also at the global level, as they ...
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Unease among Brazil's farmers as Congress votes on GM terminator seeds 12.12.2013 Guardian: Science
Environmentalists warn approval could shatter global agreement not to use technology, with devastating repercussions Brazil is set to break a global moratorium on genetically-modified "terminator" seeds, which are said to threaten the livelihoods of millions of small farmers around the world. The sterile or "suicide" seeds are produced by means of genetic use restriction technology, which makes crops die off after one harvest without producing offspring. As a result, farmers have to buy new seeds for each planting, which reduces their self-sufficiency and makes them dependent on major seed and chemical companies. Environmentalists fear that any such move by Brazil – one of the biggest agricultural producers on the planet – could produce a domino effect that would result in the worldwide adoption of the controversial technology. Major seed and chemical companies, which together own more than 60% of the global seed market, all have patents on terminator seed technologies. However, in the ...
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Family planning in Madagascar: lessons from a conservation NGO 12.11.2013 The Guardian -- World Latest
Blue Ventures has increased access to contraception from 10% in 2007 to 55% today. What can the global health community learn? The national contraception use rate in Madagascar is 29%. Yet in Velondriake, a remote area in the southwest of the country, it is 55%. Just 10% of the community had access in 2007 when the marine conservation organisation Blue Ventures launched Safidy , its family planning programme. So how did it do it? Safidy, which means "choice" in Malagasy, was born out of a desire to help the communities Blue Ventures was working with. The area had virtually no health infrastructure and a focus group revealed a huge need for family planning. Agathe Lawson, the United Nations Population Fund representative in Madagascar, who supports Blue Ventures and a number of other family planning initiatives in the country, says that asking the community for what it wanted was instrumental to Safidy's success. "Sometimes we can pre-empt what people want but qualitative research is ...
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Geoengineers are free to legally hack the climate 1.11.2013 New Scientist: Living World
Geoengineers are free to legally hack the climate
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EU debates biopiracy law to protect indigenous people 1.5.2013 Guardian: Environment
Pharmaceutical firms would need to compensate indigenous people for using their knowhow in creating new medicines The European parliament is debating a draft biopiracy law requiring industry to compensate indigenous people if it makes commercial use of local knowledge such as plant-based medicines. Under the law – based on the international convention on access to biodiversity, the Nagoya protocol – the pharmaceuticals industry would need the written consent of local or indigenous people before exploring their region's genetic resources or making use of their traditional knowhow. Relevant authorities would have the power to sanction companies that fail to comply, protecting local interests from the predatory attitude of big European companies. German firm patents South African herb The draft report on access to genetic resources by Green MEP Sandrine Bélier cites as an example a German pharmaceutical company's dealings in South Africa. Pelargonium sidoides, a variety of ...
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Letters to the International Herald Tribune: When Politics Trumps Policy 28.2.2013 International Herald Tribune: Editorials
The political expediency of U.S. foreign policy under the Obama administration is nothing new.

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Sooty ships may be geoengineering by accident 9.2.2013 New Scientist: Sex and Cloning
Sooty ships may be geoengineering by accident
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India Ink: Developing Countries Turn to Each Other for Conservation 23.10.2012 NYT > World
With much of the developed world cash-strapped, emerging nations take the lead on environmental issues.
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Op-Ed Contributors: How to Catch Fish and Save Fisheries 19.10.2012 International Herald Tribune: Editorials
Over-fishing is destroying a major food source. But we have not reached a point of no return. We have time. Solutions exist.
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US businessman defends controversial test 19.10.2012 Guardian: Environment
Russ George says he has been under a 'dark cloud of vilification' following his ocean fertilisation test off Canada's Pacific coast The American businessman who dumped around 100 tonnes of iron sulphate into the Pacific Ocean has become a lone defender of his project, after a storm of criticism from indigenous peoples, the Canadian government and a UN biodiversity meeting in India. Russ George, who told the Globe and Mail that he is the world's leading "champion" of geoengineering, says he has been under a "dark cloud of vilification" since the Guardian broke news of an ocean fertilisation scheme, funded by an indigenous village on the Haida Gwaii islands, that aimed to make money in offset markets by sequestering carbon through artificial plankton blooms. "I'm not a rich, scheming businessman, right," he said . "That's not who I am … This is my heart's work, not my hip pocket work, right?" A US agency that loaned George's company 20 expensive ocean gliders said they had been ...
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25 primate species reported on brink of extinction 17.10.2012 Boston Globe: Latest
25 primate species reported on brink of extinction
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UN meeting reviews ways to save biodiversity 16.10.2012 Boston Globe: Latest
UN meeting reviews ways to save biodiversity
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India Ink: India Pledges Millions for Global Biodiversity 16.10.2012 NY Times: World
Finding common ground on environmental issues is important, prime minister says.
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Billions needed to slow loss, report warns 16.10.2012 Guardian: Environment
UN study says the amounts needed are insignificant compared with the costs of allowing the destruction to continue Hundreds of billions of pounds will need to be spent on preserving the world's biodiversity, if the destruction of habitats, species and natural resources is to be slowed, a new report for the United Nations has found . But the amounts needed are insignificant compared with the costs of allowing the destruction to continue, according to the study. These costs include water scarcity, declining agricultural productivity, climate change and the exhaustion of fish stocks. Taken together, the perils of our destruction of biodiversity represent one of the most serious threats to the world's future, so actions taken now to tackle these threats will pay off, in the both the short and the long term, it said. Pavan Sukhdev, the economist who was chief author of the report, said: "While there are some big numbers in this report [in terms of the money that must be spent], our panel ...
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Primates are in peril - Our relatives are almost extinct 16.10.2012 Earth Times
A new report highlights the 25 most endangered primate species. The new report, Primates In Peril, was published this week at the UN's Convention on Biological Diversity COP11.
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25 primate species reported on brink of extinction 15.10.2012 Star Tribune: Latest
Twenty-five species of monkeys, langurs, lemurs and gorillas are on the brink of extinction and need global action to protect them from increasing deforestation and illegal trafficking, researchers said Monday.
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