User: newstrust Topic: NewsTrust Environment
Category: Biodiversity :: Protection :: National Parks
Last updated: Feb 19 2017 20:22 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Hiking the Sierra and Joshua Tree, plus a nature walk in San Pedro 19.2.2017 LA Times: Commentary

BACKPACKING

Presentation

Chris Casado will present his favorite trans-Sierra hike: 75 miles across Sequoia and Kings Canyon national parks to the summit of Mt. Whitney.

When, where: 7 p.m. Tuesday at the REI store in Woodland Hills, 6220 Topanga Canyon Blvd.

Admission, info: Free. (818) 703-5300

...
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Op-ed: Herbert's actions on public lands speak louder than his words 19.2.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
The governor “doth protest too much, methinks.” William Shakespeare’s famous line from Hamlet sprang to mind after reading Gov. Gary Herbert’s op-ed in last Sunday’s Tribune, “Utah loves its public lands,” which went to great lengths to proclaim Utah elected officials’ passion for doing right by the land. In fact, it is quite the opposite. Utah is ground zero for the some of the most egregious acts by elected officials seeking to disenfranchise hundreds of millions of Americans from their fed...
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National parks are free Monday for Presidents Day 18.2.2017 Headlines: All Headlines
National parks across the nation, including the six in Colorado, will be free Monday in celebration of Presidents Day
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Back pay awarded because of 2013 government shutdown 17.2.2017 Washington Post: Politics
Some 25,000 federal employees who worked unpaid during the 2013 partial government shutdown are eligible for partial back pay even though they later were paid for that time.
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“Monumental” premiers at Chief Theater 17.2.2017 Steamboat Pilot
Before your alarm clock sounds through the dark on a powder day, before you made your decision to live by a resort and backcountry, before your ski coach tied the tips of your skis together with an edgie wedgie, lies a mind-boggling expanse of centuries and landscapes of ski history. What: “Monumental: Skiing Our National Parks” screening When: Doors/bar at 6:30 p.m., Show at 7 p.m. Friday, Feb. 17 Where: Chief Theater, 813 Lincoln Ave. Tickets: $10 More information: monumental.powder.com On Friday, Feb. 17, the Chief Theater hosts “Monumental: Skiing Our National Parks,” a ski film set in Yellowstone, Yosemite, Grand Teton, Glacier and Olympic national parks. The film honors the 100th birthday of the National Parks Service, celebrated Aug. 25, 2016. “National parks aren’t necessarily thought of as common backcountry ski experiences, but they offer incredible opportunities,” said Powder Productions Executive Producer John Stifter. “What we found was better than expected.” The film’s featured skiers, ...
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Free entry to national parks and forests on Presidents Day 16.2.2017 LA Times: Commentary

If you don’t have plans for Presidents Day, maybe it’s time to make some. National parks and national forests that charge entrance fees will be free to all on the Monday holiday.

That means you save $25 at Joshua Tree National Park and $30 at Yosemite National Park, for example. And, in the local...

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Letter: Crowds show we need more public land, not less 11.2.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Utah’s state and federal legislators have consistently stated that there is too much federally protected public land in this state, arguing ownership and control should be local and likely managed by private interests. I think the reverse is true. Have they tried to drive up Little Cottonwood to recreate in Wasatch National Forest lately? Or the Uinta trailheads in the summer? Or Arches or Zion or any of our national parks now almost any time of year? Perhaps the challenge facing Utah is not ...
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Herbert: Utah loves its public lands, and I will partner more closely with outdoor industry 11.2.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
If you have followed the news and social media this week, you know the issue of public lands management has once again taken center stage in Utah. Obviously there are differences of opinion on this matter. But let me be clear about where there is full agreement: Utahns love our exceptional public lands. We love their grandeur and beauty. We love the opportunities they create for solitude and recreation. We agree that these lands must be protected. Let there be no mistake. Our criticisms of fe...
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Neighborhood Spotlight: Palos Verdes Estates' luscious view goes both ways 10.2.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Travelers heading south along the stretch of Pacific Coast Highway that runs through the crowded South Bay can hang a right at Palos Verdes Boulevard and within minutes arrive in a place of gracefully curving streets, lush green space and stunning ocean views.

There they’ll find the peak of an...

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Obama's parting shot against ammunition industry takes effect 10.2.2017 The Hill
OPINION | The administrative state serves only its own interests, not Congress or the people.
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Utah Senate approves call to shrink Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument 9.2.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
At 1.88 million acres, Utah’s Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument is larger than the combined footprints of the state’s “Mighty 5” national parks and the Cedar Breaks National Monument. That’s too big, according to a resolution approved Wednesday by the Utah Senate following passage last week in the House. HCR12 calls on Utah’s federal delegation to support a reduction or modification of the monument, which was created by then-President Bill Clinton in 1996. “Twenty years later, why sho... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Letter: Stop fighting the Bears Ears Monument 8.2.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
I am appalled at the Utah Legislature’s attempt to rescind national monument status for Bears Ears in HCR11. This is a short-sighted resolution driven by extreme right-wing, anti-government ideology. Bears Ears is a national treasure and belongs to all Americans. Moreover, all our national parks and monuments play a vital role in Utah’s economy. The state government has neither the financial commitment nor the political motivation to preserve and protect this land for public use. Indeed, as ev...
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Legislature passes safety-net spending bills 8.2.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Utah legislators completed approval of a series of safety-net “base budgets,” designed to prevent the sorts of shutdowns the federal government suffers when Congress and the president cannot agree on spending. For example in 2013, the federal government curtailed most routine operations for 15 days amid spending fights, furloughing hundreds of thousands of workers. Utah, at the time, managed to reopen national parks in the state by guaranteeing to cover their costs to help local tourism. The Leg...
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Killing the Environmental Protection Agency 5.2.2017 Daily Kos
“You’re glumping the pond where the Humming-Fish hummed! No more can they hum, for their gills are all gummed. So I’m sending them off. Oh, their future is dreary. They’ll walk on their fins and get woefully weary in search of some water that isn’t so smeary. I hear things are just as bad up in Lake Erie.” — Dr. Seuss’s The Lorax The Cuyahoga River flows into Lake Erie. The river has caught on fire 13 times since 1868; the last time it was ablaze was in June, 1969. A river caught on fire. Just about anyone would concede that seems pretty abnormal. During the 1960s Lake Erie was considered, for all intents and purposes, dead. The river fire was covered in  Time magazine , where the article described a river so saturated with sewage and industrial waste that it “oozes rather than flows.” The fire coupled with a dead Lake Erie were the catalysts that changed the course of our views on the environment. On January 1, 1970, President Nixon signed the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. Later that year ...
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Everyone on Capitol Hill Needs to Go Backpacking ASAP 5.2.2017 Mother Jones
Getting out into the wild is restorative. Fresh air, natural sounds and settings, a spot of exercise: It tends to free our mind, bring down our stress levels, and, with any luck, give us a break from work. The converse is also true. Excessive urban noise, for example, stresses us out and can wreak havoc on our psyches. These are things we know just based on everyday experience. Author and journalist Florence Williams, whose last book was Breasts: A Natural and Unnatural History , takes this knowledge way further in a new book that focuses on the science behind the health-wilderness link. For The Nature Fix , which hits bookstores this week, Williams bounced around the planet talking to naturalists, scientists, and government workers to get to the bottom of our complex relationship with our environment, which turns out to be both intensely physical and psychological. I reached out to Williams to talk about the science—and why our government is in desperate need of a monthlong camping trip. Mother Jones: ...
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Arizona Congressman pushes resolution to weaken rules on oil and gas drilling in national parks 2.2.2017 Daily Kos
On Monday, Rep. Paul Gosar, the Republican who represents Arizona’s 4th Congressional District, launched Example #117 in the Trump-era category of No Big Surprise. He introduced a resolution to eliminate rules imposed in 2016 under the Obama administration that placed restrictions on existing oil and gas drilling operations on land governed by the National Park Service. Five Republican co-sponsors joined Gosar in backing the resolution. Nicholas Lund, senior manager of the National Parks Conservation Association’s Conservation Programs, stated in a press release : “These challenges are direct attacks on America’s national parks. Each of these rules provides the commonsense protections for national parks that millions of Americans demand. If the Park Service’s drilling rules are repealed, national parks across the country would be subjected to poorly regulated oil and gas drilling, threatening parks’ air, water and wildlife. These attempts to weaken protections put our parks at risk. And by using the ...
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Wharton: Hiring freeze could cause major problems 31.1.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Part of being a good politician is condensing a complex issue into a sound bite that sounds like a good policy but can’t hold up on further scrutiny. Take, for example, one small aspect of President Donald Trump’s freeze on the hiring of federal employees as it involves the National Park Service. As is the case with many of the new president’s proclamations, no one is quite sure exactly how the hiring freeze might work. But it could cause major problems for outdoor enthusiasts visiting national ... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Ryan Zinke is one step closer to becoming interior secretary 31.1.2017 Washington Post
Ryan Zinke is one step closer to becoming interior secretary
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It's not just the Park Service: 'Rogue' federal Twitter accounts multiply 28.1.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
What started as one "unofficial resistance" Twitter account has grown to a list of more than 80 "rogue" accounts advocating for the science community and climate change research.
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What all those dead trees mean for the Sierra Nevada 28.1.2017 LA Times: Commentary

The ponderosa pine had taken root decades before the Revolutionary War, making a stately stand on this western Sierra Nevada slope for some 300 years, Nate Stephenson figures. 

Then came the beetle blitzkrieg. Now the tree is a dab in the gray and rusty death stain smeared across the mountain range.

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