User: newstrust Topic: Health Care
Category: Public Option
Last updated: Sep 22 2017 23:56 IST RSS 2.0
 
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The Graham-Cassidy Plan: Sweeping Changes In A Compressed Time Frame 22.9.2017 Health Affairs Blog
Senators Lindsey Graham (R-SC) and Bill Cassidy (R-LA) have proposed a new plan for rolling back key provisions of the Affordable Care (ACA). It is possible that the Senate will vote on this plan in the coming days. The plan has many similarities to the Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA) , which Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell assembled during June and July and which failed when considered in the Senate by a vote of 43 to 57 . The Graham-Cassidy plan is built on the premise that the federal government should remove itself from many of the difficult policy decisions concerning how health insurance is subsidized and regulated. Those decisions would be left to the states. A key provision of the plan replaces the ACA’s premium credits and funding for the Medicaid expansion with a new block grant which would provide substantial flexibility to the states to design entirely different ways of subsidizing and regulating health insurance in the individual market. Graham-Cassidy faces many challenges, not ...
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Republicans tweak Sanders over health care, but Cassidy-Graham could open a path for his bill 21.9.2017 Washington Post: Politics
The block-grant proposal at the center of Cassidy-Graham is astoundingly unpopular.
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Cassidy-Graham is attractive in theory. But it has a giant flaw. 21.9.2017 Washington Post
Cassidy-Graham is attractive in theory. But it has a giant flaw.
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What We Talk About When We Talk About Single Payer 19.9.2017 Health Affairs Blog
There appears to be growing momentum on the left for a move toward single-payer health care. Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) declared that while President Barack Obama took an important first step, “Now it’s time for the next step. And the next step is single payer.” Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) recently filed his single-payer legislation in the US Senate, with the support of 15 Democratic co-sponsors . A similar proposal has support from some Democrats in the US House of Representatives . In some cases, more progressive members of the party are targeting Democrats who do not openly support single payer. We are also seeing increasing public support for single-payer proposals. Does that mean that single payer is becoming a main tenet of the Democratic platform ? Probably not . Could a single-payer system be enacted in the current political climate? Absolutely not. Could we take some baby steps toward single payer in the not so distant future? Maybe. The Essence Of Single-Payer Health Care To break this down a ...
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Does Bernie Sanders' single-payer plan have a shot? 17.9.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Sen. Bernie Sanders’ “Medicare for All” plan, unveiled last week, is an ambitious and (to many) enticing idea: a single, government-run health plan with generous benefits for everyone — just like most industrialized countries have enjoyed for decades.

If only it were feasible in today’s United...

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Sanders's Bill Electrifies Growing Single-Payer Movement 14.9.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Supporters of Sen. Bernie Sanders hold signs on September 13, 2017, on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, at an event held by Sanders to introduce the Medicare for All Act of 2017. (Photo: Alex Wong / Getty Images) Bernie Sanders's bill, released yesterday, calls for a Medicare for All system that would cover every single American. An increasing number of voices -- in and out of Washington -- are seeing the wisdom of this reform. Will the Sanders bill be a turning point in the fight for health care justice? Supporters of Sen. Bernie Sanders hold signs on September 13, 2017, on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, at an event held by Sanders to introduce the Medicare for All Act of 2017. (Photo: Alex Wong / Getty Images) This piece is part of  Fighting for Our Lives: The Movement for Medicare for All , a Truthout original series. "It's been the summer of single-payer" --  RoseAnn DeMoro The release of Bernie Sanders'  Medicare for All Act  has injected a remarkable jolt of energy into a movement for health care ...
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Unpacking The Sanders Medicare-For-All Bill 14.9.2017 Health Affairs Blog
On September 13, Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT)—with 16 Democratic cosponsors—released the Medicare-For-All Act of 2017 , intended to transition the American health care system to a single-payer system. In addition to the bill text, Senator Sanders released an executive summary , title summary , and white paper on financing options. The Act would establish the Universal Medicare Program (UMP) and, in doing so, make sweeping changes to the health care system. Once the UMP went into effect (for children, on January 1 of the first calendar year after the bill is enacted and three years later for adults), most benefits would no longer be available under the traditional Medicare program, the Medicaid program, or the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). The bill would also end the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program, the TRICARE program, and the Affordable Care Act (ACA) marketplaces; it would prohibit the sale of private health insurance, employer-sponsored insurance, and retiree coverage if that ...
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Turning aside risk, Democrats rally to Bernie Sanders' single-payer health plan 13.9.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Like passengers leaping for a departing train, leading Democrats are scrambling to support single-payer health insurance, a system that would represent a huge expansion of government control over healthcare and which the party’s presidential nominee declared last year would “never, ever” come to...

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Analysis: Turning aside risk, Democrats rally to Bernie Sanders' single-payer health plan 13.9.2017 LA Times: Commentary
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Democrats are rushing to embrace single payer. Can it be a political winner? 12.9.2017 Washington Post: Op-Eds
Democrats are rushing to embrace single payer. Can it be a political winner?
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5 Controversial Ideas For Shoring Up Health Insurance Markets 30.8.2017 NPR News
Lawmakers looking to stabilize the health insurance exchanges may consider a number of proposals — including pushing young adults off a parent's plan, or letting people buy into Medicare and Medicaid.
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Making The Exchanges More Competitive By Bringing Medicare Into The Fold 9.8.2017 Health Affairs Blog
With the GOP repeal drive on hold, members of Congress from both parties have declared that they want to shore up the health exchanges. One of the top priorities is increasing competition among insurers. Boosting the number of plans within the exchanges not only would increase options for consumers; it would also reduce the risk an exchange could end up with no plans at all. Perhaps most important, it would likely lead to lower premiums as plans competed to attract enrollees. Yet in many counties, there’s little chance additional private plans will enter the exchanges. In what is a highly consolidated industry, some of the dominant insurers have scaled back their involvement or left the market entirely. According to the Kaiser Family Foundation , 70 percent of the 2,194 counties in the United States have fewer than three health insurers participating in the individual health insurance exchanges. The New York Times projects that in 2018, 45 counties will have no insurers participating in the exchanges, ...
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Outside Of Washington, There Is A New Vital Center In Health Care Reform 31.7.2017 Health Affairs Blog
Republicans in Congress are mired in political quicksand. Following passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in 2010, they locked themselves into a promise to repeal and replace it at the behest of ultra-conservative donors and party activists who control the GOP’s nomination process. Since 2010, however, Americans and rank-and-file Republicans increasingly came to expect help meeting the rising costs of medical care and insurance and to accept the ACA’s tangible programs to address these concrete challenges. The Democrats created their own political trap. They passed the ACA on the promise of making health care affordable but deductibles and rising premiums continued to present a burden to many Americans. Both parties are missing, however, the vital center on health reform that has formed since 2010. Americans are frustrated with Democrats for not delivering on their promise of affordability, and they are now alarmed with Republican efforts to repeal—instead of improve—the ACA’s coverage of ...
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In GOP’s repeal failure, Democrats find a potential game plan 30.7.2017 Washington Post: Politics
For many younger activists and legislators, the push to undo Obamacare is less a cautionary tale than a model of how to bring about universal coverage.
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‘Skinny repeal’ of Obamacare would leave 16 million more people uninsured in a decade, CBO says 28.7.2017 Washington Post
The plan, which could come to a vote as early as today, would have far-reaching effects, according to a congressional budget analysis. Health insurance companies warned it would drive up rates.
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Despite Rebounding Oil Royalties, Balanced Budget Out of Reach for Alberta 26.7.2017 New Kerala: World News
OTTAWA, July 26, 2017 : A slow rebound in royalties and corporate tax revenues will help shrink Alberta's deficit over the coming years. But the process will be slow and the deficit is expected to remain around USD 6.8 billion by 2019-20.
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Candidate for Md. governor shares son’s health story, slams Congress 26.7.2017 Washington Post
Candidate for Md. governor shares son’s health story, slams Congress
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Chuck Schumer Says Trumpcare Won't Pass; Public Options 'On The Table' 24.7.2017 Crooks Liars
You work with the Minority Leader you have, not the Minority Leader you want. I would much rather have someone like Kirsten Gillibrand acting as leader of the Democrats in the Senate. But Chuck Schumer is what we're stuck with, and as far as he goes he went pretty far in the direction of committing to universal public option coverage as the Democrats position on healthcare. Talking with George Stephanopolos on ABC's This Week, Schumer said this: STEPHANOPOULOS: -- it's going to be bold enough. I mean even your New York colleague, Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, talking about health care, says if you really want to get prices down, you have to go to single payer health care. Will Democrats unify behind single payer health care? SCHUMER: Well, our economic agenda -- we've talked so much about health care that we are not going to address that in this agenda. We've been talking about it. And let me just say, the first thing we're going to do should -- first, I think that this -- the TrumpCare will not pass. ...
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Trump's big repealing deal: 8 thoughts on the Senate's health care meltdown moment 19.7.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Politics
Trump seems to have wanted to show up for the trophy ceremony, not for the game. But even if Trump had plunged into the trenches, his presence there may not have made the difference.
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Trump's Big Repealing Deal: 8 Thoughts On The Senate's Health Care Meltdown Moment 19.7.2017 NPR: Healthcare
Trump seems to have wanted to show up for the trophy ceremony, not for the game. But even if Trump had plunged into the trenches, his presence there may not have made the difference.
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