User: newstrust Topic: Health Care
Category: Public Option
Last updated: Feb 20 2018 23:52 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Minnesota sees big jump in people without health insurance 20.2.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Science
There were about 116,000 more uninsured Minnesotans compared to two years prior, the state Health Department said Tuesday. The agency also noted a drop in Minnesotans with coverage offered by employers.
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Short-term spending agreement provides longer-term relief for CHIP 23.1.2018 Washington Post
Short-term spending agreement provides longer-term relief for CHIP
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Trump administration to allow states to require some Medicaid patients to work to be eligible 12.1.2018 LA Times: Nation

The Trump administration cleared the way Thursday for states to impose work requirements on many Americans who depend on Medicaid, the mammoth government health insurance program for the poor.

The much-anticipated move - which was strongly condemned by patient advocates, physicians and consumer...

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Health-Care Reform’s Disability Blind Spot 9.1.2018 American Prospect
This article appears in the Winter 2018 issue of The American Prospect magazine as part of a joint project with the Century Foundation on  Health Reform 2020 . hc2020_logo-04_jpeg.jpg Imagine that you attend a country music concert or a quiet Texas church service, or are simply stopped at a local red light. In a flash, you are shot in the neck by a mass murderer. You wake up two days later in a hospital bed, a C45 quadriplegic. You will require home health-care aides, a $45,000 customized sip-and-puff electronic wheelchair, long-term services, and supports for the rest of your life. Such atrocities highlight massive defects in American gun policy. That part is obvious. Less obvious is how these atrocities also highlight massive defects in our health policies. Many of those disabled by gunfire will face a blizzard of medical bills and struggle to get needed services, rejoin the workforce, or ever resume a normal economic life. The next generation of health-care reform needs to address these problems more ...
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On health care, Democrats are shifting to offense 8.1.2018 Denver Post: Local
Democrats are shifting to offense on health care, emboldened by successes in defending the Affordable Care Act.
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The Road to Medicare for Everyone 4.1.2018 American Prospect
This article appears in the Winter 2018 issue of The American Prospect magazine as part of a joint project with the Century Foundation on  Health Reform 2020 .  hc2020_logo-04_jpeg.jpg For the first time since the passage of the Affordable Care Act in 2010, Democrats are debating the next big steps in federal health policy. What they’re beginning to see is a path toward universal health care that looks very different from that embarked on seven years ago. This path depends on Medicare rather than the expansion of private insurance. And for those most eager to take this route, it depends on achieving something that has proven impossible in the past: replacing the patchwork quilt of American health insurance, including the employment-based health plans that cover more than 150 million people, with a single government insurance program. In a way that wasn’t true during the last fight—indeed, because of the last fight and its legacies—a growing share of those on the left are making the case that the United ...
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A New Strategy for Health Care 4.1.2018 American Prospect
This article appears in the Winter 2018 issue of The American Prospect magazine as part of a joint project with the Century Foundation on  Health Reform 2020 . hc2020_logo-04_jpeg.jpg With the Trump era only a year old and its full impact on health policy as yet unclear, it may seem premature to discuss what ought to come next. But, driven by new enthusiasm among progressives for Bernie Sanders’s single-payer plan, the debate has already begun, and if the past is any indication, supporters of reform will turn to proposals long in gestation when they are finally able to act. When that time comes, Democrats don’t want to discover they have locked themselves into commitments on health care that they cannot fulfill, just as Donald Trump and Republicans did in 2016. Democrats are justifiably angry today about the Republican efforts to sabotage the Affordable Care Act and cut Medicaid that have put health care for millions of people in jeopardy. Supporters of a universal system also have good reason to believe ...
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A New Strategy for Health Care 4.1.2018 American Prospect
This article appears in the Winter 2018 issue of The American Prospect magazine as part of a joint project with the Century Foundation on  Health Reform 2020 . Subscribe here  to The American Prospect.    With the Trump era only a year old and its full impact on health policy as yet unclear, it may seem premature to discuss what ought to come next. But, driven by new enthusiasm among progressives for Bernie Sanders’s single-payer plan, the debate has already begun, and if the past is any indication, supporters of reform will turn to proposals long in gestation when they are finally able to act. When that time comes, Democrats don’t want to discover they have locked themselves into commitments on health care that they cannot fulfill, just as Donald Trump and Republicans did in 2016. Democrats are justifiably angry today about the Republican efforts to sabotage the Affordable Care Act and cut Medicaid that have put health care for millions of people in jeopardy. Supporters of a universal system also have ...
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The Next Big Thing in Health Reform: Where to Start? 3.1.2018 American Prospect
This article appears in the Winter 2018 issue of The American Prospect magazine as part of a joint project with the Century Foundation on  Health Reform 2020 . Subscribe here to The American Prospect.  The next Democratic candidate for president or Democratic Congress will likely embrace some sort of public plan as part of the “next big thing” in health reform. Numerous congressional Democrats have thrown their weight behind Senator Bernie Sanders’s “Medicare for All” bill. Support is also growing for various kinds of “public options”—opportunities to expand the role of public programs through Medicare, Medicaid, or the health insurance marketplaces. These ideas are similar in their goal of providing lower-cost, simpler, and more secure health-care coverage for all Americans through insurance plans that are publicly backed and organized. The proposals reflect frustration with private insurers and a belief in a stronger and more direct role for government, but they differ in how they work. Single-payer ...
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Republicans' failure on health care is even greater than they realize 27.12.2017 Washington Post: Op-Eds
Republicans' failure on health care is even greater than they realize
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Health insurance expansion and physician supply 7.12.2017 Healthcare Economist
When new bills pass in Congress or state legislatures that expand health insurance coverage, most researcher look at the demand side effect.  How does the insurance expansion affect the number uninsured?  How does it affect access to care?  How does it affect out of pocket cost? What is less frequently studied is the supply side […]
Ben Jealous calls for single-payer health care in Maryland 6.12.2017 Washington Post
Ben Jealous calls for single-payer health care in Maryland
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Hard to believe: Some consumers find free health insurance 20.11.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Consumers are getting the word that taxpayer-subsidized health plans are widely available for next year for no monthly premium or little cost, and marketing companies say they're starting to see an impact on sign-ups.
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Imagining a New Social Order: Noam Chomsky and Robert Pollin in Conversation 19.11.2017 Truthout.com
Noam Chomsky and Robert Pollin discuss how the left can save the US from neoliberal excesses. (Image: Jared Rodriguez / Truthout ) In a time of deep political, social and economic uncertainty for everyone (except the ultra-rich), Noam Chomsky and Robert Pollin provide some theoretical and practical guidance for the left. This Truthout interview is an effort to help reimagine a realistic social order in an age when the old order is dying but the new has yet to be born. Noam Chomsky and Robert Pollin discuss how the left can save the US from neoliberal excesses. (Image: Jared Rodriguez / Truthout ) This story could not have been published without the support of readers like you. Click here to make a tax-deductible donation to Truthout and fund more stories like it! We live in an age of illegitimate neoliberal hegemony and soaring political uncertainty. The evidence is all around: citizen disillusionment over mainstream political parties and the traditional conservative-liberal divide, massive inequality, ...
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Lt. Governor holds town hall in Duluth to discuss creating Minnesota's own "public option" 30.10.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Lieutenant Governor Tina Smith and Human Services Commissioner Emily Piper are in Duluth Monday for a town hall to discuss creating Minnesota's own "public option" for health insurance.
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Public Option vs. Medicare for All: The Coming Debate Over Health Care Justice 25.10.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Supporters of the Affordable Care Act participate in a "Save Obamacare" rally in Los Angeles, California, on March 23, 2017. (Photo: Ronen Tivony / NurPhoto via Getty Images) A pair of centrist Democrats has offered a Medicare buy-in bill as an alternative to Medicare for All legislation in the House and Senate. While it's a sign of a leftward shift in the party, there is still much disagreement among progressives and policy experts as to whether these "public option" policies will be effective or lead to universal care. Supporters of the Affordable Care Act participate in a "Save Obamacare" rally in Los Angeles, California, on March 23, 2017. (Photo: Ronen Tivony / NurPhoto via Getty Images) Grassroots, not-for-profit news is rare -- and Truthout's very existence depends on donations from readers. Will you help us publish more stories like this one? Make a one-time or monthly donation by clicking here. Progressives have been largely united in 2017 with efforts to stop GOP health reform efforts. Should ...
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Imagining Our Way Beyond Neoliberalism: A Dialogue With Noam Chomsky and Robert Pollin 24.10.2017 Truthout.com
Noam Chomsky speaks at a Ministry of Culture event in Buenos Aires, Argentina, March 12, 2015. (Photo: Ministerio de Cultura de la Nación Argentina ) In a financialized economy, where power becomes concentrated among the economic and political elites, a dedicated and militant mass movement is needed to fight the scourge of neoliberalism, say world-renowned public intellectuals Noam Chomsky and Robert Pollin. They call for a multi-pronged campaign to cut military spending, create a financial transaction tax, end "right to work" laws and push for single-payer health care. Noam Chomsky speaks at a Ministry of Culture event in Buenos Aires, Argentina, March 12, 2015. (Photo: Ministerio de Cultura de la Nación Argentina ) This is part two of a wide-ranging interview with world-renowned public intellectuals Noam Chomsky and Robert Pollin.  Read part one here . The next installment will appear on October 31. C.J. Polychroniou: Noam, racism, inequality, mass incarceration and gun violence are pathologies that ...
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Trump's health subsidy shutdown could lead to free insurance 19.10.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Science
It's because another of the health law's subsidies would go up for people with low-to-moderate incomes, offsetting President Trump's move.
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If Republicans kill this health-care bill, they’ll prove their cowardice 19.10.2017 Washington Post: Editorials
The biparistan compromise is a necessary step forward.
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Two swing-state Democrats offer middle ground on health care 16.10.2017 Washington Post: Politics
Michael F. Bennet (Colo.) and Tim Kaine (Va.) are proposing something less dramatic than single payer.
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