User: newstrust Topic: Health Care
Category: Public Option
Last updated: Apr 19 2018 19:48 IST RSS 2.0
 
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The Health 202: Medicare is the name in Democrats' health-care game 19.4.2018 Washington Post: Politics
But is politics or policy behind the new push?
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Which inflation index should I use? 16.4.2018 Healthcare Economist
Many studies use data on health care costs from multiple time periods.  To make costs comparable over time, researchers often use an inflation index to translate previous years costs to current dollars.  The first question is, what inflation indices are available to make this adjustment.  A paper by Dunn et al. (2018) reviews the potential […]
How the Spark Became a Flame in West Virginia 13.3.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Whether you read Truthout daily, weekly or even once a month, now's the perfect time to show that you value real journalism. Make a donation to Truthout by clicking here! Teachers were celebrating at the West Virginia Capitol last week, after their nine-day, statewide strike won the passage of legislation that gives them and other state employees a 5 percent raise. Some 20,000 educators in a "right-to-work" state walked out February 22 over wages and the underfunding of the Public Employees Insurance Agency (PEIA), which provides health care coverage for state workers. The day after the strike ended, 10th and 12th grade English teacher Katie Endicott from Central Mingo High School spoke with Dana Blanchard about how this struggle came together. I would love to hear a little bit more about the Mingo story. I know you've probably told this a thousand times in the past weeks, but you all kind of started this whole thing. On Martin Luther King Jr. Day, there was a rally. That's a holiday that West Virginia ...
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West Virginia Teachers’ Strike Nets 5% Raise 6.3.2018 Outside the Beltway
We may about to see a wave of teacher strikes.
An Economic Bill of Rights for the 21st Century 5.3.2018 American Prospect
Economic mobility has drastically declined since the 1940s. Unemployment and underemployment are persistent problems, especially for stigmatized groups who are subject to discriminatory exclusion from employment opportunities. In today’s economy, the American dream is just a dream, or worse, a rhetorical device that draws attention away from the economic reality playing out across the country. Despite long-term growth in the nation’s Gross Domestic Product, in real terms middle-income Americans have less than they did 40 years ago . Poverty, especially amongst the most vulnerable in our society—our children—persists at unjust levels. Despite President Lyndon B. Johnson’s War on Poverty, declared more than 50 years ago, 43.1 million Americans remain in poverty , nearly 20 million of whom live in deep poverty . There’s no question that past policies intended to reduce poverty and inequality have fallen tragically short . It’s time to think big. The rules that govern our economy are working best for far too ...
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New Proposal Designed to Confuse Public and Prevent Medicare for All 2.3.2018 Truthout - All Articles
The Center for American Progress, a Washington-based Democratic Party think tank funded by Wall Street, including private health insurers and their lobbying group, unveiled a new health care proposal designed to confuse supporters of Medicare for All and protect health insurance profits. Activists march in support of Medicare for All on June 25, 2017, in Los Angeles, California. (Photo: Molly Adams ) Help preserve a news source with integrity at its core: Donate to the independent media at Truthout. The Center for American Progress (CAP), a Washington-based Democratic Party think tank  funded by Wall Street , including private health insurers and their lobbying group, unveiled  a new healthcare proposal  designed to confuse supporters of Medicare for All and protect private health insurance profits. It is receiving widespread coverage in 'progressive' media outlets. We must be aware of what is happening so that we are not fooled into another 'public option' dead end [1] . The fact that CAP is using ...
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West Virginia Teachers Win Promise of Pay Raise, but Continue Strike Over Soaring Health Care Costs 1.3.2018 Truthout.com
In West Virginia, public schools remain closed today, after the state's teachers' unions remained on strike over the high cost of health insurance. On Tuesday, West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice agreed to boost teacher salaries by 5 percent in the first year of a new contract, but the teachers say the deal isn't enough to offset skyrocketing premiums in the Public Employees Insurance Agency. Some 20,000 teachers and 13,000 school staffers say they'll remain on strike until they win a better agreement on healthcare. TRANSCRIPT AMY GOODMAN: But I want to ask Randi Weingarten, head of the American Federation of Teachers, one unrelated question, but because it's happening right now, not far from you, in West Virginia -- RANDI WEINGARTEN: Right. AMY GOODMAN:  -- public schools remaining closed today after the state teachers' union remained on strike over the high cost of health insurance. It was believed that the strike was ending yesterday, when Virginia Governor Jim Justice agreed to boost teacher salaries by 5 ...
Democrats considering a new strategy to expand health coverage as frustrations build with Obamacare 28.2.2018 LA Times: Nation

After spending most of 2017 defending the Affordable Care Act from GOP attacks, a growing number of Democrats believe the law’s reliance on private insurance markets won’t be enough and the party should focus instead on expanding popular government programs like Medicare and Medicaid.

The emerging...

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Follow the states 28.2.2018 Columns – The Indian Express
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Minnesota sees big jump in people without health insurance 20.2.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Science
There were about 116,000 more uninsured Minnesotans compared to two years prior, the state Health Department said Tuesday. The agency also noted a drop in Minnesotans with coverage offered by employers.
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Short-term spending agreement provides longer-term relief for CHIP 23.1.2018 Washington Post
Short-term spending agreement provides longer-term relief for CHIP
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Trump administration to allow states to require some Medicaid patients to work to be eligible 12.1.2018 LA Times: Nation

The Trump administration cleared the way Thursday for states to impose work requirements on many Americans who depend on Medicaid, the mammoth government health insurance program for the poor.

The much-anticipated move - which was strongly condemned by patient advocates, physicians and consumer...

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Health-Care Reform’s Disability Blind Spot 9.1.2018 American Prospect
This article appears in the Winter 2018 issue of The American Prospect magazine as part of a joint project with the Century Foundation on  Health Reform 2020 . hc2020_logo-04_jpeg.jpg Imagine that you attend a country music concert or a quiet Texas church service, or are simply stopped at a local red light. In a flash, you are shot in the neck by a mass murderer. You wake up two days later in a hospital bed, a C45 quadriplegic. You will require home health-care aides, a $45,000 customized sip-and-puff electronic wheelchair, long-term services, and supports for the rest of your life. Such atrocities highlight massive defects in American gun policy. That part is obvious. Less obvious is how these atrocities also highlight massive defects in our health policies. Many of those disabled by gunfire will face a blizzard of medical bills and struggle to get needed services, rejoin the workforce, or ever resume a normal economic life. The next generation of health-care reform needs to address these problems more ...
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On health care, Democrats are shifting to offense 8.1.2018 Denver Post: Local
Democrats are shifting to offense on health care, emboldened by successes in defending the Affordable Care Act.
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The Road to Medicare for Everyone 4.1.2018 American Prospect
This article appears in the Winter 2018 issue of The American Prospect magazine as part of a joint project with the Century Foundation on  Health Reform 2020 .  hc2020_logo-04_jpeg.jpg For the first time since the passage of the Affordable Care Act in 2010, Democrats are debating the next big steps in federal health policy. What they’re beginning to see is a path toward universal health care that looks very different from that embarked on seven years ago. This path depends on Medicare rather than the expansion of private insurance. And for those most eager to take this route, it depends on achieving something that has proven impossible in the past: replacing the patchwork quilt of American health insurance, including the employment-based health plans that cover more than 150 million people, with a single government insurance program. In a way that wasn’t true during the last fight—indeed, because of the last fight and its legacies—a growing share of those on the left are making the case that the United ...
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A New Strategy for Health Care 4.1.2018 American Prospect
This article appears in the Winter 2018 issue of The American Prospect magazine as part of a joint project with the Century Foundation on  Health Reform 2020 . hc2020_logo-04_jpeg.jpg With the Trump era only a year old and its full impact on health policy as yet unclear, it may seem premature to discuss what ought to come next. But, driven by new enthusiasm among progressives for Bernie Sanders’s single-payer plan, the debate has already begun, and if the past is any indication, supporters of reform will turn to proposals long in gestation when they are finally able to act. When that time comes, Democrats don’t want to discover they have locked themselves into commitments on health care that they cannot fulfill, just as Donald Trump and Republicans did in 2016. Democrats are justifiably angry today about the Republican efforts to sabotage the Affordable Care Act and cut Medicaid that have put health care for millions of people in jeopardy. Supporters of a universal system also have good reason to believe ...
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A New Strategy for Health Care 4.1.2018 American Prospect
This article appears in the Winter 2018 issue of The American Prospect magazine as part of a joint project with the Century Foundation on  Health Reform 2020 . Subscribe here  to The American Prospect.    With the Trump era only a year old and its full impact on health policy as yet unclear, it may seem premature to discuss what ought to come next. But, driven by new enthusiasm among progressives for Bernie Sanders’s single-payer plan, the debate has already begun, and if the past is any indication, supporters of reform will turn to proposals long in gestation when they are finally able to act. When that time comes, Democrats don’t want to discover they have locked themselves into commitments on health care that they cannot fulfill, just as Donald Trump and Republicans did in 2016. Democrats are justifiably angry today about the Republican efforts to sabotage the Affordable Care Act and cut Medicaid that have put health care for millions of people in jeopardy. Supporters of a universal system also have ...
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The Next Big Thing in Health Reform: Where to Start? 3.1.2018 American Prospect
This article appears in the Winter 2018 issue of The American Prospect magazine as part of a joint project with the Century Foundation on  Health Reform 2020 . Subscribe here to The American Prospect.  The next Democratic candidate for president or Democratic Congress will likely embrace some sort of public plan as part of the “next big thing” in health reform. Numerous congressional Democrats have thrown their weight behind Senator Bernie Sanders’s “Medicare for All” bill. Support is also growing for various kinds of “public options”—opportunities to expand the role of public programs through Medicare, Medicaid, or the health insurance marketplaces. These ideas are similar in their goal of providing lower-cost, simpler, and more secure health-care coverage for all Americans through insurance plans that are publicly backed and organized. The proposals reflect frustration with private insurers and a belief in a stronger and more direct role for government, but they differ in how they work. Single-payer ...
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Republicans' failure on health care is even greater than they realize 27.12.2017 Washington Post: Op-Eds
Republicans' failure on health care is even greater than they realize
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Health insurance expansion and physician supply 7.12.2017 Healthcare Economist
When new bills pass in Congress or state legislatures that expand health insurance coverage, most researcher look at the demand side effect.  How does the insurance expansion affect the number uninsured?  How does it affect access to care?  How does it affect out of pocket cost? What is less frequently studied is the supply side […]
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