User: newstrust Topic: Global Warming
Category: Impacts :: Disease
Last updated: May 27 2017 07:47 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Climate change may be keeping Americans awake at night. Literally. 27.5.2017 Washington Post
Researchers calculated that every nighttime temperature increase of 1 degree Celsius produced an additional three nights of restless sleep per 100 people per month.
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Donald Trump's laughably uncomfortable meeting and gift exchange with Pope Francis 24.5.2017 Daily Kos
Donald Trump, and his family made their way to the Vatican to meet with Pope Francis, who seemed to be in no mood to be schmoozed by America’s top con man. The meeting seemed icy from the start. From the press pool report of the initial meeting: "Thank you so much," President Trump said to Pope Francis when they shook hands. After shaking hands, the pope and POTUS  walked into the pope's private study, which is just off the room where they shook hands. When pool entered the study, the pope and the president were seated across from each other at the pope's wooden desk. POTUS told the pope it's "a very great honor." The pope did not say anything. He did not smile. He looked at pool several times. We were quickly ushered out at 8:33am. You can see that moment in the photo below. Pope Francis seems to be asking God what he did to deserve this. We’re all asking ourselves that, Holy ...
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It’s not just programs for the poor; Trump’s budget calls for vast changes to government 24.5.2017 Washington Post
Dozens of smaller budget cuts would amount to a major realignment of the government’s role in society.
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Foreign aid under the ax in State Department budget proposal 23.5.2017 Washington Post
Foreign aid under the ax in State Department budget proposal
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Fungal Diseases Are on the Rise -- Is Environmental Change to Blame? 21.5.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Scientists and physicians are looking for clues to a worrying increase in fungal infections and exploring ways to reduce the threat. (Photo: Pixabay ) Why doesn't this site have ads? In order to maintain our integrity, Truthout doesn't accept any advertising money. Help us keep it this way -- make a donation to support our independent journalism. Fungi are everywhere -- from the mushrooms that decompose fallen logs in the forest, to the mold that grows in your bathtub, to the microscopic fungal cells that reside naturally on your skin. Scientists estimate there are 1.5 million species of fungi on the planet. They're a diverse group, bunched together by their ability to use digestive enzymes to break down and absorb nutrients from their surroundings -- a characteristic that makes some of them great decomposers. Fungi are, in essence, nature's first compost bin. Many of them also help plants grow or carry out other important ecosystem functions. And some fungi are pathogens, causing disease in plants and ...
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Climate Impacts Happening Now: Westward Migration of Forests 21.5.2017 Truthout - All Articles
A recent article in The Atlantic implies climate change to be wrongly viewed as something we don't yet know much about. This article, "American Trees Are Moving West, and No One Knows Why," is half correct. The authors in the study reported upon reveal the reasons why trees are shifting west (as well as north), and that the shift is intrinsically related to climate change. That "No One Knows Why" these trees are shifting westward is fundamentally not a part of this research. The authors say that the westward shift is because climate change has changed moisture patterns, that increased moisture in western portions of the eastern U.S. is the cause for this seemingly counterintuitive westward shift, and it is predominant among young trees that are more resistant to drought even in the face of sporadic drought pulses in the west. From the paper: "The observed differential shift rates could also be due to the fact that saplings are more sensitive to droughts in terms of survival than adult trees, as ...
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Will the government help farmers adapt to a changing climate? 18.5.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
The livelihoods of farmers and ranchers are intimately tied to weather and the environment. But they may no longer be able to depend on government research to help them adapt to climate change.
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Alt-Left Insanity: Sports Site Wonders Which NBA Playoff Team Is Most Left-Wing 18.5.2017 NewsBusters
I’ve been getting a lot of “notoriety” for commenting about the extreme left and how it’s seized control from average, everyday nutty libs. Typically, this arrives in the form of hate mail. Most times when you mock the left, paid liberal trolls attack you on Twitter. If your barbs hit close to home, then the number of places the alt-left attacks you increases. My recent record is five. My original piece on the alt-left for Foxnews.com generated hate messages in: email, Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. I even got angry phone ...
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The Daily 202: Trump’s chaotic White House once again makes a bad story worse 16.5.2017 Washington Post: Politics
‘Reckless’ disclosure to the Russians is part a pattern of poor judgment
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Tick-Borne Illnesses Could Boom This Year, Thanks to Climate Change 16.5.2017 Truthout.com
Been bitten by a tick this year? As we edge toward the summer months, scientists warn that more of us could be in for that irritating nip, as tick numbers seem set to soar–and with them, the potential for a boom in cases of usually rare infections like the Powassan virus. According to the CDC , Powassan, or POW, is extremely uncommon. Only 75 cases have been reported in the United States over the past 10 years. Like other tick-borne illnesses, they usually occur in the Northeast and the Great Lakes, where grass cover is thick and the climate is moderate. Most of us are familiar with the symptoms of other tick-borne illnesses, like Lyme disease , and POW has some overlap. Signs can include -- but aren't limited to -- weakness, confusion, headaches and vomiting. However, POW can become more serious, potentially leading to fever, seizures and long-term neurological impairment. There is no specific treatment for POW, but hospitalization is often necessary. People who have contracted the virus will need ...
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Peat moss: Good for plants but bad for the planet? 11.5.2017 Washington Post
Peat moss: Good for plants but bad for the planet?
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Giraffes Are Quietly Disappearing, but the US Can Help Stop Their Silent Extinction 2.5.2017 Truthout.com
Despite their stature as the tallest land animal on earth, and status as one of the most iconic and beloved species in the world, giraffes have been quietly disappearing from the landscape at an alarming rate. Now, however, there's hope the US will act to ensure their survival by  protecting them  as an endangered species. Since the mid-1980s, the population of giraffes has declined by a startling  40 percent , leaving only an estimated 97,560 individuals in the wild. There are now fewer giraffes left in existence than elephants. In December, concerns about the threat of extinction  prompted  the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) to change their status from a species of Least Concern -- skipping right over Near Threatened -- to  Vulnerable  on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Unfortunately, they continue to face mounting pressure from a growing human population, human-wildlife conflicts, disease, habitat loss and fragmentation, predators, civil unrest, drought, climate ...
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"Superman Is Not Coming": Erin Brockovich on the Future of Water 27.4.2017 Truthout.com
Erin Brockovich speaks at the 2016 Arizona Ultimate Women's Expo at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, October 9, 2016. (Photo: Gage Skidmore ) "It's not just one Flint. It's hundreds of Flints," says environmental activist Erin Brockovich, describing how water supplies throughout the US have become repositories for industrial waste. More than 200 million Americans are exposed to the carcinogen Chromium 6 alone. With regulation-blocking Scott Pruitt in charge of our drinking water, we must mobilize to prevent widespread illness and death. Erin Brockovich speaks at the 2016 Arizona Ultimate Women's Expo at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, October 9, 2016. (Photo: Gage Skidmore ) Want to see more original stories like this? Make a tax-deductible donation to support the independent investigative reporting and analysis at Truthout! Come take a ride on America's toxic water slide: First stop: Flint, Michigan, where two years later, people are still contending with lead-laced ...
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At least global warming may get Americans off the couch more 24.4.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Places like North Dakota, Minnesota and Maine are likely to see the most dramatic increases in physical activity, usually the result of more walking. A rare, small benefit of climate change, a new study finds.
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The future of science in America 24.4.2017 Daily Kos
This Wednesday, I will hit the half-century mark. In my 50 years on this Earth, I have seen mankind walk on the moon. A computer that once was the size of a warehouse now fits in the palm of my hand. That computer that fits in the palm of my hand has more computing power than than all of the Apollo missions combined. Growing up, we were taught that there were nine planets in the entire universe. Today, we know that there are at least 1,500 within 50 light years of Earth . We have gone from wondering if we are alone in the universe to being on the cusp of discovering other life. It’s no longer a question of are we alone? Now it’s just a matter of time before we find alien life, or it finds us. We have SUV-sized rovers driving around on Mars. Think about that. We were just beginning to build cars and barely learning to fly at the beginning of the 20th century. Since then we have gone to the moon, and are driving remote-controlled cars on Mars. When I was a child one of the first rites of adulthood was ...
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Why doctors are being urged to join the March for Science 22.4.2017 LA Times: Commentary
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Will climate change help ticks and mosquitoes spread disease? 22.4.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
he disease-spreading bugs are creeping north in the states. But will they bring diseases like Lyme and Zika with them?
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Socialist ‘Liberation’ Celebrates Earth Day with Attack on Capitalism 22.4.2017 NewsBusters
Pollution is all capitalism’s fault, according to the socialists at Liberation. “Earth Day then vs. now: Capitalism is still killing us,” Liberation staff headlined a piece on April 20 — just two days before marking Earth Day ...
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Climate change as genocide 21.4.2017 Le Monde Diplomatique

Not since World War II have more human beings been at risk from disease and starvation than at this very moment. On March 10th, Stephen O'Brien, under secretary-general of the United Nations for humanitarian affairs, informed the Security Council that 20 million people in three African countries — Nigeria, Somalia, and South Sudan — as well as in Yemen were likely to die if not provided with emergency food and medical aid. “We are at a critical point in history,” he declared. “Already at the (...)

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Inaction on Climate Change Equals Human Annihilation 20.4.2017 Truthout.com
Only dramatic and concerted action on multiple fronts can prevent the human disasters now unfolding in Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan and Yemen from becoming the global norm. (Photo: Asian Development Bank ) Not since World War II have more human beings been at risk from disease and starvation than at this very moment. On March 10th, Stephen O'Brien, under secretary-general of the United Nations for humanitarian affairs, informed the Security Council that 20 million people in three African countries -- Nigeria, Somalia, and South Sudan -- as well as in Yemen were likely to die if not provided with emergency food and medical aid. "We are at a critical point in history," he declared . "Already at the beginning of the year we are facing the largest humanitarian crisis since the creation of the U.N."  Without coordinated international action, he added, "people will simply starve to death [or] suffer and die from disease." Major famines have, of course, occurred before, but never in memory on such a scale in ...
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