User: newstrust Topic: Global Warming
Category: Impacts :: Species
Last updated: Nov 21 2017 20:42 IST RSS 2.0
 
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The Energy 202: Keystone XL pipeline seems like a done deal for Trump. But it's not. 21.11.2017 Washington Post
The Energy 202: Keystone XL pipeline seems like a done deal for Trump. But it's not.
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This endangered snail lives only in the L.A. area. Can the little creatures be saved? 14.11.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Before Los Angeles was developed, the San Gabriel chestnut snail was a common sight from Compton to the San Gabriel Mountains. But today, experts say, it survives only in the Angeles National Forest and on adjacent private lands between Glendora and Altadena after being threatened by development,...

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Thousands of scientists issue bleak 'second notice' to humanity 14.11.2017 Washington Post
In 1992, scientists published a dire “warning to humanity” about a host of impending ecological disasters. A quarter-century later, most of them have gotten worse: “Soon it will be too late to shift course away from our failing trajectory,” the authors of the new statement write.
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Forest lives are changing, with combined human/insect threats. 13.11.2017 Earth Times
From Myanmar, through the Congo to the Atlantic forests of Brazil, we are neglecting our rainforests, but temperate forests are also suffering, often from pest influences as global warming really takes hold in certain regions. How to help prevent a treeless future - as always, take these pieces of well-informed, well-rounded and interesting advice.
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Drilling, Drilling, Everywhere: Will the Trump Administration Take Down the Arctic Refuge? 9.11.2017 Truthout - All Articles
(Photo: Robynm ; Edited: LW / TO)   The stories at Truthout equip ordinary people with the facts and resources to create extraordinary change. Support this vital work by making a tax-deductible donation now. What happens in the Arctic doesn't just stay up north. It affects the world, as that region is the  integrator  of our planet's climate systems, atmospheric and oceanic. At the moment, the northernmost places on Earth are  warming  at more than twice the global average, a phenomenon whose impact is already being felt planetwide. Welcome to the world of  climate breakdown  -- and to the world of Donald Trump. The set of climate feedbacks contributing to further warming in the Arctic are about to be aided and abetted by President Trump, his Interior Department, and a Republican-controlled Congress. The impact of their decisions will be experienced around the world. While the United States is still recovering from the deaths, suffering, and devastation caused by extreme hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and ...
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The Energy 202: What you need to know about Wilbur Ross and the Paradise Papers 6.11.2017 Washington Post
The Energy 202: What you need to know about Wilbur Ross and the Paradise Papers
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The Energy 202: Mining agency hopes you read its website to comment on deregulation 2.11.2017 Washington Post: Politics
Don't go looking in the federal register.
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Humans didn't outsmart the Neanderthals. We just outlasted them. 1.11.2017 Washington Post
A new study suggests that our cousins' demise was a result of population dynamics and bad timing.
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Slow flow of human immigration may have doomed Neanderthals 31.10.2017 AP National
NEW YORK (AP) -- What killed off the Neanderthals? It's a big debate, and now a study says that no matter what the answer, they were doomed anyway....
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Scientists Warn of "Ecological Armageddon" Amid Waves of Heat and Climate Refugees 30.10.2017 Truthout - All Articles
A dirt berm is maintained along the coast of Utqiaġvik, the northernmost city in Alaska, in an effort to slow seawater intrusion from increasingly severe Arctic storms. (Photo: Dahr Jamail) Scientists are sounding the alarm of an "ecological Armageddon" as insect populations across Germany collapse, wildfires scorch California and Portugal, record heat waves swelter the US late into fall, and 14 million people become climate refugees annually -- including Indigenous residents of Alaska's northern coast. While most of the world is finally acknowledging the dangers of anthropogenic climate disruption, the White House remains willfully clueless. A dirt berm is maintained along the coast of Utqiaġvik, the northernmost city in Alaska, in an effort to slow seawater intrusion from increasingly severe Arctic storms. (Photo: Dahr Jamail) As the summer Arctic sea ice melts and continues to recede further, the fragile coastline resting atop thawing permafrost is made more vulnerable to the warming waters of the ...
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The Myth of the Managed Wildfire: How US Forest Service Policies Perpetuate Deadly Wildfires 26.10.2017 Truthout.com
The idea that wildfires can be controlled is a dangerous and costly myth, promoted in large part by the timber industry, which views wildfires as a waste of economic resources, not the forest's way of rejuvenating itself. Ecologically speaking, fighting wildfires makes about as much sense as fighting hurricanes, yet we spend nearly $3 billion annually on the effort. Tanker helicopters fight a wildfire on October 16, 2017, in Oakville, California. At least 40 people were killed with many are still missing, and at least 5,700 buildings have been destroyed since wildfires broke out a week ago. (Photo: Elijah Nouvelage / Getty Images) Research is clear  that the wildfires the US experienced this year are more widespread and increasingly intense as our climate heats up. Consistent with the US government's head-in-the-sand approach to the climate crisis generally, our national wildfire "management" policy flies in the face of science and reason. If we don't learn to adapt to climate change's growing coastal ...
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Road Kill: Side-Swiping the Environmental Protection Act 22.10.2017 Truthout.com
The Pacific walrus was denied protected status early this month. (Photo: US Geological Survey ) Ready to challenge injustice and spark real change? So are we. Support Truthout's mission today by making a tax-deductible donation. A senate appropriations subcommittee, led by Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) will resist the Trump administration's efforts to slash spending for the Environmental Protection Agency and the Interior Department this week. Last summer, Murkowski warned the White House that there was no chance her panel would agree to cut the EPA's $8 billion budget by almost a third. But the budget isn't the only thing that's endangered. The administration is leading a campaign to toss out a growing list of rules and regulations that protect our environment and the all plants and animals that are trying to thrive alongside us. To see more stories like this, visit Moyers & Company at Truthout. An Endangered Act The Endangered Species Act itself is under attack. Since January, congressional Republicans ...
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Dolphin diets show how climate change could alter food chains off the California coast 20.10.2017 LA Times: Science

Scientists studying dolphins dining off the California coastline have found that the marine food web is starting to look a little threadbare. The length of food chains in that web appears to have gotten shorter in response to environmental changes — such as those caused by El Niño events.

The finding...

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The Energy 202: Western wildfires spark compromise on firefighting in Washington 19.10.2017 Washington Post: Politics
A group of senators, led by Maria Cantwell, will today introduce legislation.
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Slow trees and climate change: Why bristlecone pine will still outlive you 13.10.2017 LA Times: Commentary

In a time of relentless change, it’s soothing to contemplate deeply rooted, long-lived trees. But now our climate of uncertainty affects even Great Basin bristlecone pine, Pinus longaeva, the species with the world’s oldest known individuals. How should we respond? With alarm, indifference or something...

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World's largest trees given new hope for preservation 12.10.2017 Planet Ark News
A new project will decode genetic make-up of world's largest trees in order to better understand and protect them.
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Warming to Blame for Western Wildfires? 10.10.2017 FactCheck
Q: Did climate change cause the wildfires out West? A: Scientists say a hot and dry summer — conditions more likely in a warmer world — caused widespread wildfires in ...
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The Energy 202: Here's how Trump's sage grouse fix could backfire 6.10.2017 Washington Post
The Energy 202: Here's how Trump's sage grouse fix could backfire
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The Energy 202: Here are the Trump officials who went to a mining meeting at Trump's hotel 5.10.2017 Washington Post: Politics
Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke couldn't make it.
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Interior Department rejects 25 endangered species petitions, including several linked to climate change 5.10.2017 Washington Post
Interior Department rejects 25 endangered species petitions, including several linked to climate change
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