User: newstrust Topic: Global Warming
Category: Impacts :: Species
Last updated: Sep 16 2017 05:47 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 4,089    
Long-endangered snow leopard upgraded to ‘vulnerable’ status 15.9.2017 Washington Post: World
The elusive snow leopard — long considered endangered — has been upgraded to “vulnerable,” though conservations warned the new classification does not mean they are safe.
Also found in: [+]
The Energy 202: Here's what solar energy research is going to look like under Trump 13.9.2017 Washington Post: Politics
Hint: it doesn't involve solar panels on the president's border wall.
Also found in: [+]
Coffee, bees and climate change are linked in ways you may not have expected 12.9.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
A new study projects that by 2050, climate change could reduce the amount of ground usable to grow coffee in Latin America by up to 88 percent. Bees play a key role in increasing coffee yields.
Also found in: [+]
The Military’s Warning on Global Warming 12.9.2017 ConsortiumNews.com
The U.S. military, which gets called on to cope with unrest tied to global warming, is taking the climate threat seriously as opposed to civilian politicians who are pandering to special interests, says ethicist Daniel C. Maguire. By Daniel C.…Read more →
Also found in: [+]
Seeding the future? 'Ark' preserves rare, threatened plants 10.9.2017 AP National
FRAMINGHAM, Mass. (AP) -- An ordinary-looking freezer in a sturdy cinderblock shed at a suburban Boston botanical garden holds what might be New England's most important seed catalog....
Also found in: [+]
How Some African Farmers Are Responding to Climate Change -- and What We Can Learn From Them 2.9.2017 Truthout.com
As sub-Saharan Africa's climate changes, small-scale farmers are increasingly looking to innovative ways of dealing with agricultural challenges. And in some instances, the techniques they adopt are helping to combat climate change, too. Alternative animal feed, climate-friendly grasses and the use of fodder trees are among the examples providing farmers resilience and leading to benefits such as more productive livestock and new business opportunities -- all while reducing greenhouse gas emissions and building healthy soils. As unpredictable weather and natural disasters hamper food security across the globe, innovation will be paramount for the world's food producers, from smallholder farmers to industrial operations. Here are three novel ways African farmers are using adaptive strategies to thrive. Brachiaria Grass In sub-Saharan Africa, some farmers are adapting to climate change by seeding pastures with brachiaria grass. Some varieties of this forage can survive harsh conditions, such as drought and ...
Also found in: [+]
Vanishing kelp: Warm ocean takes toll on undersea forests 22.8.2017 AP National
APPLEDORE ISLAND, Maine (AP) -- When diving in the Gulf of Maine a few years back, Jennifer Dijkstra expected to be swimming through a flowing kelp forest that had long served as a nursery and food for juvenile fish and lobster....
Also found in: [+]
‘Increase in vector-borne cases can be attributed to mosquito adaptability to changing environment’ 21.8.2017 Chandigarh – The Indian Express
Also found in: [+]
Deforestation and Climate Disruption Are Degrading the Amazon, Endangering Our Survival 7.8.2017 Truthout.com
The Amazon Rainforest, the most biologically diverse place on Earth, is threatened by deforestation and anthropogenic climate disruption. (Photo: CIAT ; Edited: LW / TO) As human beings, our survival depends upon respecting the complexity of the Earth's ecosystems and protecting them, say the experts in Brazil tasked with protecting the Amazon rainforest from the effects of human-caused climate disruption. The Amazon is one of the most important and biodiverse ecosystems, and it is being deforested at an astonishing rate. The Amazon Rainforest, the most biologically diverse place on Earth, is threatened by deforestation and anthropogenic climate disruption. (Photo: CIAT ; Edited: LW / TO) Sao Paolo and Brasilia, Brazil -- Warwick Manfrinato, the director of Brazil's Department of Protected Areas, has a deep understanding of biological interdependence, as well as its importance. "If we are of utter service to nature, then we provide the benefits to all other living things on the planet," Manfrinato told ...
Also found in: [+]
Planting Resilience to Climate Change 6.8.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Aurelia Arzú inspects the cocoplum patch and reaches in to pluck the ripest fruits. It’s early in the year, and the season is just beginning, so the bush is loaded with edible, plum-sized fruit ripening from yellow to pink in the unrelenting afternoon sun. Arzú bites into the cocoplum, quite literally eating the fruits of her labor. Together with other local Garifuna women, she planted cocoplum, seagrape, and other native coastal plants on and around the sand dunes in an effort to halt their advance and prevent further displacement of Santa Rosa de Aguán community residents. Aurelia Arzú inspects a cocoplum bush planted by local Garifuna women, selecting the ripest fruit to eat. (Photo: Sandra Cuffe) "It fills me with pride to see this and to know that the women helped protect our community," says Arzú, looking out at the burgeoning vegetation. Arzú's footprints crisscross the sandy expanse, tracing a path from the Caribbean Sea lapping at the northern coast of Honduras to the dunes now dotted with ...
Also found in: [+]
Scientists say patches of dead trees along the east coast are ‘the most obvious indicator of climate change’ 1.8.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Port Republic, N.J. • They’re called “ghost forests” — dead trees along vast swaths of coastline invaded by rising seas, something scientists call one of the most visible markers of climate change. The process has occurred naturally for thousands of years, but it has accelerated in recent decades as polar ice melts and raises sea levels, scientists say, pushing salt water farther inland and killing trees in what used to be thriving freshwater plains. Efforts are underway worldwide to determine e...
Also found in: [+]
Seas rise, trees die: Climate change before your eyes 1.8.2017 AP Top News
PORT REPUBLIC, N.J. (AP) -- They're called "ghost forests" - dead trees along vast swaths of coastline invaded by rising seas, something scientists call one of the most visible markers of climate change....
Also found in: [+]
Study finds aardvarks suffering as African climate heats up 31.7.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Johannesburg • Little is known about Africa’s elusive aardvarks, but new research says they are vulnerable to climate change like many other species. Hotter temperatures are taking their toll on the aardvark, whose diet of ants and termites is becoming scarcer in some areas because of reduced rainfall, according to a study released Monday. Drought in the Kalahari desert killed five out of six aardvarks that were being monitored for a year, as well as 11 others in the area, said researchers at th...
Also found in: [+]
Study finds aardvarks suffering as African climate heats up 31.7.2017 Washington Post: World
Little is known about Africa’s elusive aardvarks, but new research says they are vulnerable to climate change like many other species.
Also found in: [+]
Moby, Russell Simmons and Others Speak Out on an Issue that Needs Our Immediate Attention 24.7.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Featuring remarks from Gene Baur, Jenny Brown, Sylvia Earle, Jane Goodall, Bill Maher, Moby, Kathy Najimy, Ingrid Newkirk
Also found in: [+]
The Daily 202: Asking about a pardon for himself is a quintessentially Trumpian move 21.7.2017 Washington Post: Politics
He’s acted like the rules don’t apply to him his whole life.
Also found in: [+]
Stream insects live well in Yorkshire 21.7.2017 Earth Times
How important are our streams and rivers to us in this age of pollution and interference with natural systems? The effect of conifer plantations is generally negative, but the positive effects on some f these streams could point to ways to improve many such forestry projects, as well as the original moorland.
Also found in: [+]
The Energy 202: Jon Huntsman's Russia connections run through Chevron 20.7.2017 Washington Post: Politics
His spokesman says he'll leave all boards.
Also found in: [+]
Are our gardens the monarch butterfly sanctuaries we think they are? 19.7.2017 Washington Post
Are our gardens the monarch butterfly sanctuaries we think they are?
Also found in: [+]
Long-debated Newhall Ranch project gets key approvals from county 19.7.2017 LA Times: Commentary

After decades of controversy, the Newhall Ranch development in the Santa Clarita Valley cleared its last major hurdle Tuesday when county officials certified a revised environmental analysis and approved two of the project’s five planned subdivisions.

In two separate 4-0 votes, the Los Angeles...

Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 4,089