User: newstrust Topic: Global Warming
Category: Impacts :: Ecosystems
Last updated: Dec 04 2016 23:43 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Top Scientists: Amazon's Tapajós Dam Complex "a Crisis in the Making" 4.12.2016 Truthout - All Articles
The Tapajós River, Brazil. More than 40 dams would turn this free-flowing river and its tributaries into a vast industrial waterway threatening the Tapajós Basin's ecosystems, wildlife, people and even the regional and global climate. (Photo: International Rivers on Flickr, licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0) license) Brazil is forging ahead with plans to build a vast hydropower dam complex in the heart of the Amazon that would convert the now remote and wild Tapajós river system into a tamed industrial waterway for the purpose of transporting soybeans -- development that scientists and NGOs say will threaten Amazonian biodiversity , ecosystems, traditional livelihoods, indigenous cultures, and the global climate. A total of 42 large dams are planned or under construction in the Tapajós Basin, a biologically and culturally rich region, and one of eight areas of Amazonian biological endemism . Fed by tributaries in the states of Mato Grosso, Rondônia and ...
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Spotlight on green news & views: Vets to stand with 'water protectors'; Greenland melts faster 1.12.2016 Daily Kos
Spotlight on Green News & Views (previously known as the Green Diary Rescue) usually appears twice a week, on Wednesdays and Saturdays.  Here  is the November 16 Green Spotlight. More than 25,970 environmentally oriented stories have been rescued to appear in this series since 2006. Inclusion of a story in the Spotlight does not necessarily indicate my agreement with or endorsement of it. OUTSTANDING GREEN STORIES  Mushrooms in the wet late autumn of the Pacific Northwest OceanDiver writes— The Daily Bucket - wet Northwest bottomland : “November is wet in the Pacific Northwest. I was down on the mainland visiting with family last week, and while I went outside walking in the rain every day, I took my camera out one afternoon when the sun sort of broke through for a little while. Here are some moist scenes from a bottomland habitat in western Washington.These lowlands were settled and logged by the end of the 19th c so stumps like the mossy one above are all that remains of the primeval forests. But ...
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'Green News Report' - November 29, 2016 30.11.2016 BradBlog
IN TODAY'S RADIO REPORT: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers issues eviction notice to Dakota Access Pipeline protest camp; U.S. Chemical Safety Board investigating third oil refinery fire in two days; Extreme water shortages caused by drought trigger state of emergency in Bolivia; Major coral die-off along northern Great Barrier Reef; ...
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Balmy Monday: Thunder and hail, 2nd warmest November 28.11.2016 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
November running 10 degrees warmer than average.
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Pacific Northwest Tribes Fight to Protect the Centerpiece of Their Culture 24.11.2016 Truthout.com
The Tulalip are one of dozens of Pacific Northwest tribes -- both in Washington State and British Columbia -- intertwined by their reliance on and reverence for salmon. This cultural icon is under assault from development, pavement, pollution, farming and a changing climate. (Photo: Environmental Health News) This story is part of " Sacred Water," EHN's ongoing investigation into Native American struggles -- and successes -- to protect culturally significant water sources on and off the reservation. Tulalip, Washington -- The flat-bottom boat weaves across bends in the broad, mud-colored Qwuloolt Estuary, scaring up squawking blue herons and geese along the sloping banks of muck. Scattered log booms poke out. "A little more than a year ago we were driving cars out here," says Francesca Hillery, a Tulalip Tribes spokeswoman, tucked tightly in a raincoat and baseball cap to protect against the early autumn drizzle blowing in from the Sound as the skiff glides across the water. In August 2015, the U.S. Army ...
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Juvenile activists sue government over climate change policy 23.11.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Seattle • Eight children are asking a Seattle judge to find Washington state in contempt for failing to adequately protect them and future generations from the harmful effects of climate change, part of a nationwide effort by young people to try to force action on global warming. The petitioners, between 12 and 16 years old, are heading back to court Tuesday afternoon to ask a state judge to step in and order the state Department of Ecology to do a better job of curbing greenhouse gas emissions....
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Young activists seek tougher action on climate change 22.11.2016 AP Washington
SEATTLE (AP) -- Eight children are asking a Seattle judge to find Washington state in contempt for failing to adequately protect them and future generations from the harmful effects of climate change....
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A world inching towards climate change catastrophe can't afford Trump's proposed energy policies 22.11.2016 LA Times: Commentary

To see how seriously Donald J. Trump takes the health of the environment, you need look no further than his transition team’s website. Environmental issues aren’t even listed — though there is a page pledging to achieve “energy independence” by opening up public lands and offshore sites for oil-and-gas...

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Officials reassess impact of roads, trails on bull trout 18.11.2016 AP Washington
BOISE, Idaho (AP) -- Federal officials are reconsidering how roads and motorized trails in part of the Sawtooth National Forest could harm threatened bull trout following a lawsuit by an environmental group....
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How forest ecosystems work in NW Europe and the Yukon 15.11.2016 The Earth Times Online Newspaper - Environment News
The climate of the Arctic is changing more rapidly than most other regions, but just south of there is the treeline and then the greatest forests left on earth. How will they and their inhabitants change as the warming continues over the next century or so, and are we able to help?
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Letter: Keep climate a priority 13.11.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
After the upset election of Donald Trump, I fear for the countless human communities, species and ecosystems threatened by climate change. President-elect Trump’s dismissal of the issue and his plan to abandon our nation’s commitment to reduce harmful emissions are beyond irresponsible. We are reaching critical climatic tipping points. And neither vulnerable areas, from Bangladesh to our own state, nor threatened species, like the Ivory Gull and the African Quiver Tree, have four years to wait ... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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India sees Kashmir's storied Wular Lake worth more restored 12.11.2016 AP Top News
WULAR LAKE, India (AP) -- Tucked within Kashmir&apos;s Himalayan foothills sits a freshwater lake that was once among Asia&apos;s largest. Long an inspiration to poets, beloved by kings, Wular Lake has been reduced in places to a fetid and stinking swamp....
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Here Are the Races to Watch If You Care About Global Warming 7.11.2016 Mother Jones
The climate didn't get much attention in this year's debates, but Tuesday's election will still have a major consequences for the fight against global warming. Donald Trump thinks climate change is a hoax ; he's pledged to withdraw from the historic Paris climate accord and to repeal President Barack Obama's Clean Power Plan , which is intended to cut greenhouse gas emissions from coal plants. Hillary Clinton has said she will continue Obama's climate legacy and has called for installing half-a-billion solar panels by the end of her first term. The debate isn't restricted to the top of the ticket; there are a number of state races that will play a key role in determining US climate policy, along with a handful of ballot initiatives covering everything thing from rooftop solar to a proposed carbon tax. The situation in each state is unique. Some races—New Hampshire's Senate contest, for instance—feature two candidates who want to act on climate change. Others, such as West Virginia's gubernatorial ...
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Spotlight on green news & views: Kochs pour $$ into TX council race; FL solar amendment scam 6.11.2016 Daily Kos
Spotlight on Green News & Views (previously known as the Green Diary Rescue) appears twice a week, on Wednesdays and Saturdays.  Here is the most recent previous Green Spotlight.  More than 25,790 environmentally oriented stories have been rescued to appear in this series since 2006. Inclusion of a story in the Spotlight does not necessarily indicate my agreement with or endorsement of it. OUTSTANDING GREEN STORIES  David Armiak via EXPOSEDbyCMD writes— Kochs Invest in Corpus Christi City Council as New Refinery Is Built : “As the Koch brothers continue construction of a massive expansion at their Flint Hills Resources refinery in Corpus Christi, Texas, they are also making political investments in that city. An October 20, 2016, Federal Elections Committee (FEC)  filing  from the Koch Industries, Inc., Political Action Committee (KochPAC) shows that the Kochs are backing seven candidates at different levels of government in the city: a candidate for Mayor, five candidates for City Council, and one for ...
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'Green News Report' - November 1, 2016 1.11.2016 BradBlog
IN TODAY'S RADIO REPORT: Massive Colonial Pipeline explosion in Alabama injures at least seven workers; Unarmed Dakota Access Pipeline protesters maced and arrested, while armed occupiers in Oregon go free; 300 million kids breathe dangerously polluted air, according to UNICEF; PLUS: It's official: largest earthquake on record in Kansas ...
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Species may be listed as threatened based on climate change projections, court says 25.10.2016 LA Times: Nation

Federal authorities may list a species as “threatened” based on climate models that show habitat loss in the coming decades, an appeals court decided Monday.

Oil company groups and Alaskan natives had challenged a decision by the federal government to list a sea ice seal subspecies as threatened...

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Unforeseen Consequences: The Death of Trees 18.10.2016 Truthout - All Articles
We need to start respecting how necessary forests are for the health of our planet -- and our species. (Photo: Artur / Flickr ) It's autumn here in the nation's capital, and that means that in a normal year, trees would be bursting with color, the air would turn crisp, and harvest apples and seasonal apple products would fill store shelves. Except that right now, apple growers in Virginia's Shenandoah Valley are struggling to grow apples, and climate change is to blame. The really bad news isn't that Virginia apple harvests are failing -- that's just a signpost for some of the most dire climate change scenarios that we're heading for. Because if apple trees are starting to fail and die as our planet warms and climate changes, trees of every type will start to fail and die, too. NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies recently reported that September 2016 "was the warmest September in 136 years of modern record-keeping." See more news and opinion from Thom Hartmann at Truthout here. There's no doubt ...
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Spotlight on green news & views: SEC looks into Exxon; California could last for centuries 22.9.2016 Daily Kos
Spotlight on Green News & Views (previously known as the Green Diary Rescue) appears twice a week, on Wednesdays and Saturdays.  Here is the most recent previous Green Spotlight.  More than 25,525 environmentally oriented stories have been rescued to appear in this series since 2006. Inclusion of a story in the Spotlight does not necessarily indicate my agreement with or endorsement of it. OUTSTANDING GREEN STORIES  FishOutofWater writes— 375 National Academy Scientists Rebuke Trump, Warn of Severe Outcome of Quitting Paris Climate Deal : “Today 375 members of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, including 30 Nobel laureates, warned that the consequences of opting out of the Paris climate agreement, as planned by Donald Trump, would be severe and long-lasting for our planet’s climate and for the credibility of the United States. Distinguished MIT Professor Kerry Emanuel, one of the authors of the letter, is a philosophical conservative who was driven out of the Republican party by climate change ...
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Court gives lynx ‘fighting chance’ in Southwest Colorado 19.9.2016 Durango Herald
A U.S. District Court has ordered U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to reconsider its decision to exclude the Canada lynx’s entire southern Rocky Mountain range — which includes Southwest Colorado — from designation as critical habitat.Lynx were re-introduced into Southwest Colorado in the late 1990s and have since...
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Extinction looms for native bird species on the Hawaiian island of Kauai 16.9.2016 LA Times: Commentary

Hawaiian honeycreepers have lived in the islands’ tropical forests for millennia, but the colorful finch-like birds are facing “imminent collapse” on Kauai, experts say.

Scientists have observed severe population declines in almost all of the island’s honeycreepers, a famously diverse family of...

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