User: newstrust Topic: Global Warming
Category: Impacts :: Ecosystems
Last updated: Jun 24 2016 03:32 IST RSS 2.0
 
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New Bill Would Give Bees And Other Struggling Pollinators A Boost 24.6.2016 Think Progres

Pollinators are under huge amounts of stress, struggling to survive as habitats are destroyed.

The post New Bill Would Give Bees And Other Struggling Pollinators A Boost appeared first on ThinkProgress.

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Spotlight on green news & views: Changing climate brings silence to entire eco-systems 23.6.2016 Daily Kos
Spotlight on Green News & Views (previously known as the Green Diary Rescue) appears twice a week, on Wednesdays and Saturdays. Here is the most recent previous Green Spotlight .  More than 25,360 environmentally oriented stories have been rescued to appear in this series since 2006. Inclusion of a story in the Spotlight does not necessarily indicate my agreement with or endorsement of it. OUTSTANDING GREEN STORIES  Pakalolo writes— A haunting silence is spreading over the natural world : “’These are soundscapes that no one will ever experience again in their natural state. They exist now only as an abstraction, a digital acoustic impression of what we once had.’ — Bernie ​ Krause . Climate change has brought entire natural habitats to complete silence. The song of birds, the croaking of frogs and the buzzing of insects have vanished in areas where climate change eco-system impacts kill species that are unable to evolve quickly enough to adjust to a rapidly changing environment. Species that can migrate ...
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Climate Change Could Alter the Chemistry of Deepwater Lakes and Harm Ecosystems 21.6.2016 Truthout - All Articles
In an age of rapid global population growth, demand for safe, clean water is constantly increasing. In 2010 the United States alone used 355 billion gallons of water per day . Most of the available fresh water on Earth's surface is found in lakes, streams and reservoirs, so these water bodies are critical resources. As a limnologist, I study lakes and other inland waters. This work is challenging and interesting because every lake is an ecosystem that is biologically, chemically and physically unique. They also are extremely sensitive to changes in regional and global weather and long-term climate patterns. For these reasons, lakes are often called "sentinels of change." Like the figurative canary in the coal mine, lakes may experience change to their ecosystem dynamics before we start to see shifts in the greater watersheds around them. In a study I recently co-authored with Goloka Behari Sahoo, S. Geoffrey Schladow, John Reuter , Robert Coats and Michael Dettinger , we projected that future climate ...
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Global coral bleaching event expected to last through 2016 21.6.2016 AP National
HONOLULU (AP) -- After the most powerful El Nino on record heated the world's oceans to never-before-seen levels, huge swaths of once vibrant coral reefs that were teeming with life are now stark white ghost towns disintegrating into the sea....
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Open thread for night owls—Where the wild things aren't: National Parks 20.6.2016 Daily Kos
Nathan C. Martin at The Baffler writes— Where the Wild Things Aren’t: National Parks : As the National Park Service celebrates its centennial this summer, the compulsory stories and listicles acknowledging the event will lazily trot out the Ken Burns–sanctioned notion that national parks are “America’s Best Idea.” Of course, it was a good idea to protect exceptional places like the Grand Canyon and Yosemite against rapacious use of the land. But does the decision to refrain from destroying places that obviously shouldn’t be destroyed really amount to a stroke of national genius? And, given what we know about ecology a century later, should park-making still serve as a model for conservation? Preserving nature is not the straightforward proposition it seemed to be back in Theodore Roosevelt’s day. Rough-riding politicos can no longer enshrine wilderness by simply removing indigenous people and cordoning off a few rugged sections of landscape. National parks today face conundrums of which Roosevelt could ...
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Scientists battle to save world's coral reefs 19.6.2016 AP National
HONOLULU (AP) -- More than 2,000 international reef scientists, policymakers and stakeholders are gathering in Hawaii this week to discuss the latest coral science and what can be done to stop widespread death of the world's reefs....
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Global Warming Caused This Animal To Go Extinct 17.6.2016 Think Progres

And it won't be the last.

The post Global Warming Caused This Animal To Go Extinct appeared first on ThinkProgress.

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Coral reef census will help scientists protect fragile underwater habitats 16.6.2016 LA Times: Science

Despite pressures from overfishing and changing ocean conditions, some coral reefs around the world manage to defy expectations.

In a survey of more than 2,500 reefs around the world, scientists identified 15 that were surprisingly healthy, considering their proximity to large human populations or unfavorable...

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Even Indoor Kids Should Worry About California’s 30 Million Dead Trees 15.6.2016 Wired Top Stories
Even Indoor Kids Should Worry About California’s 30 Million Dead Trees
Drought, sudden oak death, and bark beetle are turning the Golden State's forests into kindling. The post Even Indoor Kids Should Worry About California's 30 Million Dead Trees appeared first on WIRED.
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Australian Government Pledges $1 Billion To Save The Great Barrier Reef From Climate Change 15.6.2016 Think Progres

Climate change has been battering the Great Barrier Reef, and Australia's prime minister just announced increased action.

The post Australian Government Pledges $1 Billion To Save The Great Barrier Reef From Climate Change appeared first on ThinkProgress.

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Coral Reefs in Danger as They Struggle to Adapt to Climate Disruption 13.6.2016 Truthout - All Articles
A recent UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) report on world heritage sites in danger from climate change received widespread media attention after the Australian government requested the removal of a chapter on the Great Barrier Reef. However the Great Barrier Reef is not the only coral reef at risk from climate change. The  report  described how coral reefs all around the world are being directly effected by warming waters and acidification associated with changes in the climate. While coral reefs can adapt to gradual changes in ocean temperature, especially if they are free from other local stressors like over-fishing and water pollution, it is expected that their ability to adapt is "highly likely" to be outstripped by rates of climate change in the coming decades, the report said. Keeping half of the world's coral reefs would require stopping warming at just 1.2 degrees, the report said, while preserving more than 10 percent would require limiting warning to 1.5 degrees ...
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Video: Trump’s Drought Claims 10.6.2016 FactCheck
This week CNN's Jake Tapper takes a look at Donald Trump's misleading claims about California’s drought and water management issues.
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Bay Area Residents Said Yes To Fighting Sea Level Rise With Wetlands 9.6.2016 Think Progres

San Francisco Bay voters just said yes to a tax for climate adaptation and a Bay cleanup.

The post Bay Area Residents Said Yes To Fighting Sea Level Rise With Wetlands appeared first on ThinkProgress.

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Trump’s Dubious Drought Claims 9.6.2016 FactCheck
Donald Trump suggests "there is no drought” in California because the state has “plenty of water.” He promises "to start opening up the water," and he says he'll "get it done quick." But there is a drought, and we explain why there is no "quick" solution.
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NASA takes 23,000-foot view of the world's coral reefs 9.6.2016 AP National
COCONUT ISLAND, Hawaii (AP) -- Coral reefs have almost always been studied up close, by scientists in the water looking at small portions of larger reefs to gather data and knowledge about the larger ecosystems. But NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory is taking a step back and getting a wider view, from about 23,000 feet above....
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Midday open thread: Arctic greening not a good thing; low-income assistance doesn't make people lazy 8.6.2016 Daily Kos
Today’s comic by Jen Sorensen is  Radical cleric vs. Trump : • Greening of the Arctic tundra ain’t a good thing : The region is showing the fastest warming in the northern hemisphere. Grassy tundra is changing to shrubland, product of a warmer ecosystem. In a separate study, the USGS reports that roughly 53% of America’s carbon – material that could stay in the permafrost or, in a warming world,  escape into the atmosphere to accelerate climate change  even further – is stored in the forests, wetlands and permafrost of Alaska. The finding, which is explained in detail in a new study, means that  Alaska’s carbon potential is greater than that of all the other 49 states put together . And it’s a cause for worry. • Republicans really are awful : Thanks to Sen. Tom Cotton, Cassandra Butts waited 835 days for Senate confirmation of her nomination to be ambassador to the Bahamas. And then she died suddenly, age 50. Before she died, she told Frank Bruni at The New York Times that Cotton had told her when she ...
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Want to Live on Mars? You’ll Need to Make Some Martian Bricks 7.6.2016 Wired Top Stories
Want to Live on Mars? You’ll Need to Make Some Martian Bricks
Scientists are working to transform Martian regolith into a radiation-shielding construction material. The post Want to Live on Mars? You’ll Need to Make Some Martian Bricks appeared first on WIRED.
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Is this booming northwest land a paradise or disaster waiting to happen? 6.6.2016 LA Times: Nation
It was here before anyone made a map and called this corner of it the Pacific Northwest. "To me," said David McCloskey, waving an aging hand toward tidelands formed millenniums ago, "it's an energy field." McCloskey, a retired sociology and ecology professor who has spent a lifetime exploring the...
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Cascadia, a state of mind and a megaquake 6.6.2016 LA Times: Nation

It was here before anyone made a map and called this corner of it the Pacific Northwest.

“To me,” said David McCloskey, waving an aging hand toward tidelands formed millenniums ago, “it’s an energy field.”

McCloskey, a retired sociology and ecology professor who has spent a lifetime exploring the...

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Washington state aims to limit carbon pollution 1.6.2016 AP Washington
SEATTLE (AP) -- Washington state's largest industrial polluters would be required to reduce carbon emissions gradually over time under a proposed rule....
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