User: newstrust Topic: Global Warming
Category: Impacts :: Ecosystems
Last updated: Oct 01 2014 03:55 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Why the Web of Life Is Dying 1.10.2014 Truthout.com
"There's eventually a point at which the biological systems of planet Earth that support human life will just stop functioning if it loses too many species and thus too badly frays the web of life." (Photo: Dom Dada ) Could you survive with just half of your organs? Think about it. What if you had just half your brain, one kidney, half of your heart, one lung, half a liver and only half of your skin? It would be pretty hard to survive right? Sure, you could survive losing just one kidney or half of your liver, but at some point, losing pieces from all of your organs would be too much and you would die. Well, this is exactly what's happening to the web of life on planet Earth right now. Like the human body, our planet is a living organism, and like the organs in the body, all of our planet's species are interconnected. They form the web of life. And, just like the human body can survive with just one kidney or one eye, our planet and the web of life can survive without a few species here and there. But, ...
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Why the Web of Life Is Dying 1.10.2014 Truthout.com
"There's eventually a point at which the biological systems of planet Earth that support human life will just stop functioning if it loses too many species and thus too badly frays the web of life." (Photo: Dom Dada ) Could you survive with just half of your organs? Think about it. What if you had just half your brain, one kidney, half of your heart, one lung, half a liver and only half of your skin? It would be pretty hard to survive right? Sure, you could survive losing just one kidney or half of your liver, but at some point, losing pieces from all of your organs would be too much and you would die. Well, this is exactly what's happening to the web of life on planet Earth right now. Like the human body, our planet is a living organism, and like the organs in the body, all of our planet's species are interconnected. They form the web of life. And, just like the human body can survive with just one kidney or one eye, our planet and the web of life can survive without a few species here and there. But, ...
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Human Activities Have Cut Animal Populations In Half Since 1970 1.10.2014 Think Progres

Habitat degradation, exploitation, and climate change have cut global vertebrate populations by 52 percent in the last four decades, according to a new study.

The post Human Activities Have Cut Animal Populations In Half Since 1970 appeared first on ThinkProgress.

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Winged Warnings: Built for Survival, Birds in Trouble From Pole to Pole 30.9.2014 Truthout.com
Sole descendents of the dinosaurs, birds have penetrated nearly every ecosystem on Earth and then tailored their own size, habits and colors to each one, pollinating, dispersing seeds, controlling bugs, cleaning up carrion and fertilizing plants, all the while singing notes so beguiling that hearing them makes even the urban dweller pause to listen. Birds are the planet’s superheroes, built for survival. But for all their superhuman powers, they are in trouble. Startled by a glacier calving, the black-legged kittiwakes took to the sky in a flurry of activity, St Jonsfjorden, Prins Karls Forland in Greenland. (Photo: Marie and Alistair Knock ) Truthout only exists thanks to the support of our readers. Help us continue to publish truly independent journalism by making a tax-deductible donation today! The ice of Antarctica doesn’t faze birds. Nor does the heat of the tropics. They thrive in the desert, in swamps, on the open ocean, on sheer rock faces, on treeless tundra, atop airless mountaintops and ...
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Despite Its Remoteness, Antarctica's Health Matters 30.9.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
I've had the privilege of doing research in places that are seldom seen by humans: remote, nearly pristine reefs in the Phoenix Islands ; seamounts near Cocos Island ; and the waters of Indonesia and Palau. But Antarctica was the locale that took my breath away. It is the biggest, wildest, strangest and most remote place on Earth. There the air is so clear and its beauty so stunning, you wonder if you have just learned to see. Today, the Ocean Health Index released its first assessment of the health of Antarctica and the Southern Ocean . The results show that distance, fierce winds, bitter cold, the raging seas and plenty of ice have managed to diminish the human impact on the inaccessible Southern Ocean. But despite its geographic isolation, it has not been enough. Antarctica's Delicate Balance Over the past century, whalers and sealers nearly extirpated blue whales from the region, and so heavily damaged other species that the International Whaling Commission (IWC) declared a moratorium on commercial ...
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Corporations Are Not Going to Save Us From Climate Disruption 30.9.2014 Truthout - All Articles
With apparent naïveté, the UN insists on taking its cue from the very corporations who are responsible for degrading the planet, destroying lives and creating the crisis in the first place. This is pervasive throughout institutions and governments across the globe, not only the UN. The reason is money. Participants in the People's Climate March 2014 in New York City, September 21. (Photo: South Bend Voice ) Truthout readers like you made this story possible. Show your support for independent news and make a tax-deductible donation today! This past week in New York saw some remarkable actions around climate change. The massive People's Climate March was perhaps the main media spectacle, but it was not the only, or necessarily the most important event. Another important one: the Climate Justice Summit, which featured the voices and testimonials of people all around the country and the globe who are on the frontlines, bearing the brunt of both ruthless extraction and destruction of their lands and ...
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The Wilderness Act Turns 50: Celebrating the Great Laws of 1964 29.9.2014 Truthout.com
Let us now praise famous laws and the year that begat them: 1964. The first thing to know about 1964 was that, although it occurred in the 1960s, it wasn’t part of “the Sixties.” The bellbottoms, flower power, LSD, and craziness came later, beginning about 1967 and extending into the early 1970s. Trust me: I was there, and I don’t remember much; so by the  dictum  variously attributed to Grace Slick, Dennis Hopper, and others (that if you can remember the Sixties, you weren’t part of them), I must really have been there. 1964 was a revolutionary year. It was a time when Congress actually addressed the people’s business, and it gave us at least three great laws. One was the monumental  Civil Rights Act , which aspired to complete the tragic and sanguinary work of the Civil War and achieve the promise of the Thirteenth Amendment. The least known of the three was the  Land and Water Conservation Fund Act , which, by drawing on revenue from offshore oil and gas leases, provided the means for the federal and ...
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The Wilderness Act Turns 50, Celebrating the Great Laws of 1964 29.9.2014 Truthout.com
Let us now praise famous laws and the year that begat them: 1964. The first thing to know about 1964 was that, although it occurred in the 1960s, it wasn’t part of “the Sixties.” The bellbottoms, flower power, LSD, and craziness came later, beginning about 1967 and extending into the early 1970s. Trust me: I was there, and I don’t remember much; so by the  dictum  variously attributed to Grace Slick, Dennis Hopper, and others (that if you can remember the Sixties, you weren’t part of them), I must really have been there. 1964 was a revolutionary year. It was a time when Congress actually addressed the people’s business, and it gave us at least three great laws. One was the monumental  Civil Rights Act , which aspired to complete the tragic and sanguinary work of the Civil War and achieve the promise of the Thirteenth Amendment. The least known of the three was the  Land and Water Conservation Fund Act , which, by drawing on revenue from offshore oil and gas leases, provided the means for the federal and ...
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Climate Change: The Next Generation 25.9.2014 Truthout - All Articles
Kelsey Juliana, an 18-year-old activist, is fighting climate change in the courts and walking across the country to spread the word on global warming. As world leaders converge for the UN’s global summit on climate and thousands gather in New York for the People’s Climate March , Bill talks to 18-year-old Oregonian Kelsey Juliana, who is walking across America to draw attention to global warming. Kelsey Juliana comes by her activism naturally – her parents met in the 1990’s while fighting the logging industry’s destruction of old growth forests and she attended her first protest when she was two months old. Now just out of high school, she’s co-plaintiff in a major lawsuit being spearheaded by Our Children’s Trust that could force the state of Oregon to take a more aggressive stance against the carbon emissions warming the earth and destroying the environment. She’s walking across America as part of the Great March for Climate Action, due to arrive in Washington, DC, on November 1. “You don’t have to ...
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Obama to create world’s largest protected marine reserve in Pacific Ocean 25.9.2014 Washington Post: Politics
President Obama will use his legal authority Thursday to create the world’s largest fully protected marine reserve in the central Pacific Ocean, demonstrating his increased willingness to advance a conservation agenda without the need for congressional ...
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Spotlight on green news & views: People's Climate March and the aftermath, #FloodWallStreet 25.9.2014 Daily Kos
Members of the Daily Kos community show the colors at the People's Climate March. Many environmentally related posts appearing at Daily Kos each week don't attract the attention they deserve. To help get more eyeballs, Spotlight on Green News & Views (previously known as the Green Diary Rescue) appears twice a week, on Wednesdays and Saturdays. The most recent Saturday Spotlight can be seen here . So far, more than 19,440 environmentally oriented diaries have been rescued for inclusion in this weekly collection since 2006. Inclusion of a diary in the Spotlight does not necessarily indicate my agreement with or endorsement of it. Why I Marched - My Journey —by BettytheBoop: "I participated to the March for many reasons. I was too young to participate in some of the most remarkable marches of the 60s and 70s. And I haven't taken part in marches in a very long time-though I try to contribute to the causes I feel strongly about. But this time--this felt like such a watershed moment that I felt I had to be ...
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New Desert Plan Proposes Clean Energy-Conservation Balance For One-Quarter Of California 25.9.2014 Think Progres

The plan would be in place for the next quarter century and would designate about two million acres for developing 20 gigawatts of renewable energy projects.

The post New Desert Plan Proposes Clean Energy-Conservation Balance For One-Quarter Of California appeared first on ThinkProgress.

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Ten things in nature that could vanish before your kids see them 24.9.2014 Washington Post
In their losing battle with television and digital devices, conservationists have urged parents to get the kiddies to the great outdoors . But even if parents managed to pull their children away from cellphones, what would they find in America's ...
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Open thread for night owls: Three activists discuss climate change actions 24.9.2014 NewsTrust Yahoo Pipes Feed
Child Laborer, Newberry, South Carolina, photographed in 1908 by Lewis H. Hine, a sociologist who used the camera to document conditions in which young American children worked in the early 1900s. At Democracy Now on Tuesday, Amy Goodman and Aaron Maté explored the views of three people active in the climate change movement: AMY GOODMAN: We’re joined right now by three guests. Vandana Shiva is the executive director of the Navdanya Trust in India, which promotes biodiversity conservation, organic farming, the rights of farmers, and the process of seed saving, author of many books, including Making Peace with the Earth and Soil Not Oil: Environmental Justice in an Age of Climate Crisis. Desmond D’Sa is with us. He’s coordinator of the South Durban Community Environmental Alliance in South Africa, the recipient of the 2014 Goldman Environmental Prize. And Winona LaDuke is also here, Native American activist and executive director of the group Honor the Earth. She lives and works on the White Earth ...
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Jerry Brown brings 'hopeful' California story to climate change conference 24.9.2014 LA Times: Opinion
Gov. Jerry Brown touted California's environmental record Tuesday at a United Nations event in New York dedicated to spurring new action on climate change.
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Climate change deserves front-page coverage 24.9.2014 LA Times: Opinion
To the editor: More than 310,000 people demonstrated in New York on Sunday, urging the United Nations to take strong action on climate change. Many thousands marched worldwide in support. ("Thousands pack New York's streets to march against climate change," Sept. 21)
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What about those other greenhouse gases? 23.9.2014 LA Times: Commentary
The U.N. Climate Summit that starts Tuesday is a precursor to the Paris climate conference scheduled for next year. No treaty will come out of the summit in New York, which is more of a brainstorming and cheerleading session.
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Climate change fears spur divestment on fossil fuels 22.9.2014 Chicago Tribune: Business
In the run-up to a United Nations summit this week aimed at combating climate change, a small but growing number of multimillion-dollar investors are demanding more aggressive steps to wean countries from fossil-fuel ...
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Climate change fears spur divestment on fossil fuels 22.9.2014 LA Times: Environment
In the run-up to a United Nations summit this week aimed at combating climate change, a small but growing number of multimillion-dollar investors are demanding more aggressive steps to wean countries from fossil-fuel consumption.
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Spotlight on green news & views: People's Climate March, cutting carbon emissions, Bardarbunga burps 21.9.2014 Daily Kos
Many environmentally related posts appearing at Daily Kos each week don't attract the attention they deserve. To help get more eyeballs, Spotlight on Green News & Views (previously known as the Green Diary Rescue) appears twice a week, on Wednesdays and Saturdays. The most recent Wednesday Spotlight can be seen here . So far, more than 19,360 environmentally oriented diaries have been rescued for inclusion in this weekly collection since 2006. Inclusion of a diary in the Spotlight does not necessarily indicate my agreement with or endorsement of it. What to Do When You're Running Out of Time —by Rebecca Solnit via TomDispatch: "There have undoubtedly been stable periods in human history, but you and your parents, grandparents, and great-grandparents never lived through one, and neither will any children or grandchildren you may have or come to have. Everything has been changing continuously, profoundly—from the role of women to the nature of agriculture. For the past couple of hundred years, change has ...
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