User: newstrust Topic: Global Warming
Category: Impacts :: Ecosystems
Last updated: Jul 20 2017 19:36 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 3,584    
Climate scientist says he was demoted for speaking out on climate change 20.7.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Joel Clement, who was director of the Interior Department's Office of Policy Analysis during the Obama administration, says in a newspaper op-ed that he was reassigned to an "accounting office."
Also found in: [+]
Elon Musk downplays expectations for giant rocket's first flight 20.7.2017 LA Times: Business

SpaceX Chief Executive Elon Musk on Wednesday downplayed expectations for the upcoming demonstration flight of the company’s giant Falcon Heavy rocket, saying there was a “good chance” the vehicle would not make it to orbit in its first launch.

Musk gave insight into the Falcon Heavy development...

Also found in: [+]
Are our gardens the monarch butterfly sanctuaries we think they are? 19.7.2017 Washington Post
Are our gardens the monarch butterfly sanctuaries we think they are?
Also found in: [+]
The Daily 202: Trump’s children become bigger liabilities for the White House, complicate damage-control efforts 14.7.2017 Washington Post: Politics
You can’t fire family.
Also found in: [+]
Report: Asia facing dire future toll from climate change 14.7.2017 AP Business
A report by the Asia Development Bank says Asia will endure extreme heat, rising sea levels, growing losses from severe weather and increasing food insecurity in coming decades as climate change raises temperatures and alters weather patterns across the globe....
Also found in: [+]
'Chasing Coral' has an urgent message about climate change: The coral reef is dying 14.7.2017 LA Times: Commentary

While governments and politicians dither about global warming, the world’s undersea coral is moving toward a devastating death. If you don’t believe that, or don’t think it really matters, “Chasing Coral” presents the evidence with beauty, intelligence and a surprising amount of emotion.

One of...

Also found in: [+]
‘Chasing Coral’ beautifully captures death in the oceans 13.7.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
The beauty of “Chasing Coral” is matched only by its urgency, as director Jeff Orlowski encapsulates the issue of global climate change by showing where it’s doing real, measurable damage in real time: the world’s coral reefs. Orlowski interviews an array of marine biologists who study coral reefs, which are to the ocean what trees are to rainforests: an anchor for an entire ecosystem. So when these scientists saw instances of “bleaching” — colorful coral suddenly turning clear white — they scra...
Also found in: [+]
The Energy 202: Should the Defense Department take seriously the threat of climate change? 13.7.2017 Washington Post
The Energy 202: Should the Defense Department take seriously the threat of climate change?
Also found in: [+]
Polar bears hurt by climate change are more likely to turn to a new food source — humans 13.7.2017 Washington Post
Polar bears hurt by climate change are more likely to turn to a new food source — humans
Also found in: [+]
The Arctic is full of mercury, and scientists think they know how it's getting there 13.7.2017 Washington Post
The Arctic is full of mercury, and scientists think they know how it's getting there
Also found in: [+]
Happy birthday to Henry David Thoreau, a great sleep scholar 12.7.2017 LA Times: Commentary

On this 200th anniversary of Henry David Thoreau’s birth, we celebrate what he did while he was awake: resisting the long arm of the state when it came knocking on his door to collect taxes that funded an unjust war; chronicling the changing ecosystem of his beloved ponds and rivers; modeling a...

Also found in: [+]
California can fight climate change and reduce local pollution at the same time 10.7.2017 LA Times: Commentary

To the editor: This editorial concludes with the right message: So far our state’s climate change program has worked well and should be extended. (“California may be leading on climate change, but that doesn’t mean it can ignore local pollution,” editorial, July 1)

The role of offsets in California’s...

Also found in: [+]
While corals die along the Great Barrier Reef, humans struggle to adjust 9.7.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
It's the world's biggest coral reef system, home to some 400 types of coral. In the past 18 months, rising ocean temperatures helped cause the single greatest loss of coral ever recorded there.
Also found in: [+]
As Habitat Fragmentation Increases, So Does Extinction Risk 8.7.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Researchers have long assumed that when animals are left without large areas of intact habitat, they are at greater risk of extinction: fragmentation leaves animals confined to ever-smaller areas, restricting movement and gene flow and leaving species vulnerable to threats ranging from poachers to climate change. A  study published July 3  in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) set out to quantify this risk for more than 4,000 land-dwelling mammal species across the globe -- and found that species with more fragmented habitats were at greater risk of extinction. This link persisted even when researchers accounted for other factors including species' body size and overall range size. "We used statistical models that evaluated the relative contribution of fragmentation and geographic range size, as well as body size, on extinction risk," lead author Kevin Crooks, a professor in Colorado State University's Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology, told Mongabay by email. ...
Also found in: [+]
What would happen to the climate if we stopped emitting greenhouse gases today? 4.7.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
International climate talks in Lima this week are laying the foundation for next year's UN climate summit in Paris. While negotiations about reducing emissions grind on, how much warming are we already locked into? If we stop emitting greenhouse gases tomorrow, why would the temperature continue to rise?
Also found in: [+]
Extinction or habitat management - the stark choice. 4.7.2017 Earth Times
The extinction of small and large, plant and animal is a daily event now, as climate change increasingly joins the other anthropogenic influences on the species of our planet. Mapping the possibilities and modelling the effects is now finally helping out with the problems, but we still have to conserve, and quickly.
Also found in: [+]
It's Raining in Antarctica While Trump Slashes Climate Science Funding 3.7.2017 Truthout - All Articles
In Antarctica, scientists were stunned to find rainfall and a melt area larger than the size of Texas in 2016. (Photo: Echinophoria / Getty Images) Parts of Antarctica are turning green due to unprecedented moss growth on the ice continent where an area larger than Texas has experienced half a month of continuous surface melt. As President Trump and his administration continue their assault on climate science and scientists, atmospheric CO2 keeps rising to new record levels. In Antarctica, scientists were stunned to find rainfall and a melt area larger than the size of Texas in 2016. (Photo: Echinophoria / Getty Images) This Memorial Day I awoke in a tent high on Klahhane Ridge in Washington state's Olympic National Park. With the Strait of Juan de Fuca just to the north, and a sweeping view of Mount Olympus and the rest of the park to the south, the sunset the night before went on for hours. After the sun set, slivers of red arched across the sky in streaks on the underbellies of a few wispy clouds. ...
Also found in: [+]
The Planet Is in Our Hands: Countering Trump's Climate Crimes 1.7.2017 Truthout - All Articles
The current climate crisis will not simply go away after a regime change at the next US election or after piecemeal efforts to cut emissions through the use of wind, solar and other sustainable energy technologies. What we need is a more drastic and rapid transformation of the world's energy system than even what the Paris climate agreement called for. People march from the US Capitol to the White House for the People's Climate Movement to protest President Donald Trump's enviromental policies on April 29, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo: Astrid Riecken / Getty Images) In light of the tremendous stakes of the climate crisis for the future of life on Earth, Donald Trump's decision to pull the US out of the Paris climate accord was a monstrous act. It came after previous acts by the regime to gut climate and other environmental protections, undermine the Endangered Species Act and protections for wildlife, open public lands and the oceans to further exploitation of fossil fuels, put science-deniers who are ...
Also found in: [+]
Despite global warming, scientists find that wildfires are actually burning less land 30.6.2017 Washington Post
Despite global warming, scientists find that wildfires are actually burning less land
Also found in: [+]
Climate Destabilization Causing Thousands of New Species Migrations: Plant, Animal, Insect, Bird 26.6.2017 Truthout - All Articles
A spate of new research studies has confirmed a disturbing pattern: climate disruption is confusing migratory birds, causing trees to relocate and allowing tropical diseases to spread northward. "Human society has yet to appreciate the implications of unprecedented species redistribution for life on Earth, including for human lives," states a study, " Divergence of Species Responses to Climate Change ," published May 17, 2017, in Science Advances. Imagine if you had to travel thousands of miles and arrive at a specific time each year, but you had no way of knowing the precise time you needed to get there. That's what it's like for many songbirds that migrate from Central and South America each spring to breeding grounds in the US and Canada. If they were to arrive too early, they wouldn't find food and could freeze to death. If they arrive late, the best nesting sites may be taken and there will be fewer opportunities to find a mate. For countless generations, these birds have been able to rely on ...
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 3,584