User: newstrust Topic: Global Warming
Category: Impacts :: Ecosystems
Last updated: May 24 2017 23:43 IST RSS 2.0
 
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In NE Minnesota, planting pines to fight climate change 24.5.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: News
The Nature Conservancy is planting 50,000 trees this spring in "conifer strongholds," places the trees are expected to thrive, even in a warmer climate. One expert calls it a "test kitchen" for saving northern forests.
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Fungal Diseases Are on the Rise -- Is Environmental Change to Blame? 21.5.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Scientists and physicians are looking for clues to a worrying increase in fungal infections and exploring ways to reduce the threat. (Photo: Pixabay ) Why doesn't this site have ads? In order to maintain our integrity, Truthout doesn't accept any advertising money. Help us keep it this way -- make a donation to support our independent journalism. Fungi are everywhere -- from the mushrooms that decompose fallen logs in the forest, to the mold that grows in your bathtub, to the microscopic fungal cells that reside naturally on your skin. Scientists estimate there are 1.5 million species of fungi on the planet. They're a diverse group, bunched together by their ability to use digestive enzymes to break down and absorb nutrients from their surroundings -- a characteristic that makes some of them great decomposers. Fungi are, in essence, nature's first compost bin. Many of them also help plants grow or carry out other important ecosystem functions. And some fungi are pathogens, causing disease in plants and ...
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Thanks to global warming, Antarctica is starting to turn green 19.5.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Researchers in Antarctica have discovered rapidly growing banks of mosses on the ice continent’s northern peninsula, providing striking evidence of climate change in the coldest and most remote parts of the planet. Amid the warming of the last 50 years, the scientists found two different species of mosses undergoing the equivalent of growth spurts, with mosses that once grew less than a millimeter per year, now growing over 3 millimeters per year on average. “People will think of Antarctica quit...
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An 'evolutionary gamble' may be killing Joshua Tree's mother tortoises 16.5.2017 LA Times: Environment

Wildlife biologists say an alarming number of female desert tortoise carcasses found earlier this year just outside the southern edge of Joshua Tree National Park may be the result of mothers fighting extinction by exhausting their water and energy to lay eggs, even under stress.

U.S. Geological...

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Trump's expected choice for the leading USDA science job isn't a trained scientist 14.5.2017 Washington Post
Sam Clovis is a former economics professor and talk radio host in Iowa who served as one of the Trump campaign’s first policy advisers. He's also a doubter of climate change.
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Spotlight on green news & views: NYT hit on denier hire; ALEC & criminalizing eco-activists 14.5.2017 Daily Kos
This is the 498th edition of the Spotlight on Green News & Views (previously known as the Green Diary Rescue) usually appears twice a week, on Wednesdays and Saturdays. Here  is the May 10 Green Spotlight. More than 26,900 environmentally oriented stories have been rescued to appear in this series since 2006. Inclusion of a story in the Spotlight does not necessarily indicate my agreement with or endorsement of it. OUTSTANDING GREEN STORIES OceanDiver writes— The Daily Bucket - crossing paths with sea turtles : “Sea turtles are rare and gentle creatures. Occasionally I’ll cross paths with one when I’m diving in the Caribbean, and I respectfully pause to watch them calmly but purposefully cruising the depth. For one thing, I know they are holding their breath the whole time, but never look out of their element. They are air breathers like me but completely at home in the sea, their only time ashore crawling clumsily across a beach to lay eggs. They are vulnerable then, with most of their eggs doomed to be ...
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Fueling a flight to quality 2.5.2017 BuzzMachine

Storyful and Moat — together with CUNY and our new News Integrity Initiative*— have announced a collaboration to help advertisers and platforms avoid associating with and supporting so-called fake news. This, I hope, is a first, small step toward fueling a flight to quality in news and media. Add to this: A momentous announcement by Ben Gomes, […]

The post Fueling a flight to quality appeared first on BuzzMachine.

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Giraffes Are Quietly Disappearing, but the US Can Help Stop Their Silent Extinction 2.5.2017 Truthout.com
Despite their stature as the tallest land animal on earth, and status as one of the most iconic and beloved species in the world, giraffes have been quietly disappearing from the landscape at an alarming rate. Now, however, there's hope the US will act to ensure their survival by  protecting them  as an endangered species. Since the mid-1980s, the population of giraffes has declined by a startling  40 percent , leaving only an estimated 97,560 individuals in the wild. There are now fewer giraffes left in existence than elephants. In December, concerns about the threat of extinction  prompted  the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) to change their status from a species of Least Concern -- skipping right over Near Threatened -- to  Vulnerable  on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Unfortunately, they continue to face mounting pressure from a growing human population, human-wildlife conflicts, disease, habitat loss and fragmentation, predators, civil unrest, drought, climate ...
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The melting Arctic threatens a traditional lifestyle of living off the water 1.5.2017 Washington Post
Climate change has upended the culture and economy of the Inugguit, hunters who arrived in Greenland’s northernmost village in 1953. Encroaching problems include mercury polluting their food supply and increased isolation for a people used to traveling atop the ice.
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Review: Coal terminal would boost global climate-warming gas 29.4.2017 AP Washington
SEATTLE (AP) -- A coal-export terminal proposed in Washington state would increase cancer risks for some residents, make rail accidents more likely and add millions of metric tons of climate-changing greenhouse gas globally every year, according to an environmental study released Friday....
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Review: Coal terminal would boost pollution, safety issues 29.4.2017 AP Washington
SEATTLE (AP) -- A coal-export terminal proposed in Washington would increase cancer risk for some residents, add 2 million metric tons of global greenhouse gas emissions a year and increase the risk of rail accidents, according to an environmental study released Friday....
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Bound for the National Science Bowl, three Edina students first rally for science 23.4.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Three Edina High School students were happy to spend their Saturday morning among the thousands of demonstrators at the March for Science Minnesota in St. Paul.
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Tribune Op-ed: What's more conservative than reverence for the Earth? 23.4.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Earlier in February, the Senate confirmed Scott Pruitt to head the EPA on a largely party line vote. Both Utah senators, Orrin Hatch and Mike Lee, voted for his confirmation. Conventional political wisdom suggests this was unsurprising. But should it be? Many Republicans, like Arnold Schwarzenegger, Lindsay Graham, Hank Paulson and several Republican House members, including Utah’s Mia Love, publicly support taking action on climate change. But more need to take up the mantle. In our increasing...
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Science is core to wildlife conservation 22.4.2017 The Moderate Voice
The human impact on wildlife is growing more and more every year – not only due to global warming but also through agriculture gobbling up more and more land, habitat destruction, hunting and poaching, transportation… most of the things we do as a society have a negative impact on wildlife, when they’re done excessively. Biologists ...
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This Earth Day, join the Global March for Science 22.4.2017 Boing Boing
All over the world , people who believe in science, facts, and reality are marching for action on climate change, against a backdrop of overt (Trump) and insidious ( Trudeau ) climate-change denial, which puts the future of our species and its habitat in grave peril. As I write this at 6AM on the west coast, they're already marching in Australia, New Zealand, the Philippines, and Europe. Soon, they will be in the streets in America. It's a key moment. The urgent questions of our day -- economic justice, gender inequality, racial injustice, discrimination on the basis of sexuality -- are all in play. A planet that is flooding and boiling is a planet where authoritarian strongmen can push aside these questions, barking "lifeboat rules!" and insisting that in a crisis, obedience must be swift and total, and that the captain of the lifeboat gets to decide what is and isn't a pressing concern. Get out there. Here's a directory of 600 global marches . Here's an excellent 3-minute video on protecting your ...
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The Perfect Movie for Your Earth Day Date Night 22.4.2017 Mother Jones
While Hollywood has been on a roll with climate change films, most of them have concentrated on the planet's impending doom. The team behind the new French documentary Tomorrow  takes a different tactic. "I discovered that showing catastrophes—explaining what is going wrong in the world—is not enough," co-director Cyril Dion tells Mother Jones. "We also need to have energy and enthusiasm to build another future." It was a challenge to convince others' of this opinion, Dion says: "Nobody believed in a positive documentary about ecology, economy, and democracy." Instead, the Caésar-award-winning film, originally released in France in 2015, was partly crowd-funded. As French actress Mélanie Laurent (Inglourious Basterds) implores in the film, "This movie is about thousands of people changing the world so we would like it to be financed by thousands of people willing to do the same." Over a backdrop of twee music, the upbeat Laurent and Dion serve as our tour guides into everyday communities that have taken ...
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The ‘war on science’ doesn’t just hurt scientists. It hurts everyone. 22.4.2017 Washington Post
The ‘war on science’ doesn’t just hurt scientists. It hurts everyone.
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Will climate change help ticks and mosquitoes spread disease? 22.4.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
he disease-spreading bugs are creeping north in the states. But will they bring diseases like Lyme and Zika with them?
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French Elections: Alt-Right, Total and Gold Mines, the Story Behind the Candidates' Environmental Policies 21.4.2017 Truthout - All Articles
The birthplace of the Paris Climate Agreements, the first round of France's presidential election on starts on Sunday, April 23. Throughout the campaign debates on the environment have often been sidelined, with the three leading candidates showing no sign of real climate leadership. The backdrop to the election campaign has been full of "fake news", Brexit and Donald Trump. It has also been mired in scandals over corruption claims and  growing concerns of Russian interference . Many in France are still deciding who to vote for in one of the most unpredictable elections yet. If no candidate wins a majority on April 23, a second election round featuring the top two candidates will take place on May 7. Far-right Marine Le Pen's rise through the polls shows the populist pulse of Brexit and Trump's election continues to resonate on the continent. But Le Pen's efforts to give the Front National (FN) a new, greener image is tainted by the party's ongoing magnet effect with alt-right groups which reject ...
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Status of forests is 'dire' as world marks 2017 Earth Day 21.4.2017 LA Times: Commentary

They cover a third of the world’s landmass, help to regulate the atmosphere, and offer shelter, sustenance and survival to millions of people, plants and animals.

But despite some progress, the planet’s woodlands continue to disappear on a dramatic scale.

Since 1990 the world has lost the equivalent...

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