User: newstrust Topic: Global Warming
Category: Impacts :: Forest
Last updated: May 27 2017 03:48 IST RSS 2.0
 
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The populist ethical issue hurting Virginia Democrats 27.5.2017 Washington Post: Op-Eds
Public financing could help them seem less beholden to corporate interests.
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In NE Minnesota, planting pines to fight climate change 24.5.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: News
The Nature Conservancy is planting 50,000 trees this spring in "conifer strongholds," places the trees are expected to thrive, even in a warmer climate. One expert calls it a "test kitchen" for saving northern forests.
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Stop hoping we can fix climate change by pulling carbon out of the air, scientists warn 23.5.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Scientists are expressing increasing skepticism that we’re going to be able to get out of the climate change mess by relying on a variety of large-scale land use and technical solutions that have been not only proposed, but often relied upon in scientific calculations. Two papers published last week debunk the idea of planting large volumes of trees to pull carbon dioxide out of the air — saying there just isn’t enough land available to pull it off — and also various other strategies for “carbon...
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Stop hoping we can fix climate change by pulling carbon out of the air, scientists warn 23.5.2017 Washington Post
Stop hoping we can fix climate change by pulling carbon out of the air, scientists warn
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Fungal Diseases Are on the Rise -- Is Environmental Change to Blame? 21.5.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Scientists and physicians are looking for clues to a worrying increase in fungal infections and exploring ways to reduce the threat. (Photo: Pixabay ) Why doesn't this site have ads? In order to maintain our integrity, Truthout doesn't accept any advertising money. Help us keep it this way -- make a donation to support our independent journalism. Fungi are everywhere -- from the mushrooms that decompose fallen logs in the forest, to the mold that grows in your bathtub, to the microscopic fungal cells that reside naturally on your skin. Scientists estimate there are 1.5 million species of fungi on the planet. They're a diverse group, bunched together by their ability to use digestive enzymes to break down and absorb nutrients from their surroundings -- a characteristic that makes some of them great decomposers. Fungi are, in essence, nature's first compost bin. Many of them also help plants grow or carry out other important ecosystem functions. And some fungi are pathogens, causing disease in plants and ...
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Climate Impacts Happening Now: Westward Migration of Forests 21.5.2017 Truthout - All Articles
A recent article in The Atlantic implies climate change to be wrongly viewed as something we don't yet know much about. This article, "American Trees Are Moving West, and No One Knows Why," is half correct. The authors in the study reported upon reveal the reasons why trees are shifting west (as well as north), and that the shift is intrinsically related to climate change. That "No One Knows Why" these trees are shifting westward is fundamentally not a part of this research. The authors say that the westward shift is because climate change has changed moisture patterns, that increased moisture in western portions of the eastern U.S. is the cause for this seemingly counterintuitive westward shift, and it is predominant among young trees that are more resistant to drought even in the face of sporadic drought pulses in the west. From the paper: "The observed differential shift rates could also be due to the fact that saplings are more sensitive to droughts in terms of survival than adult trees, as ...
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Alt-Left Insanity: Sports Site Wonders Which NBA Playoff Team Is Most Left-Wing 18.5.2017 NewsBusters
I’ve been getting a lot of “notoriety” for commenting about the extreme left and how it’s seized control from average, everyday nutty libs. Typically, this arrives in the form of hate mail. Most times when you mock the left, paid liberal trolls attack you on Twitter. If your barbs hit close to home, then the number of places the alt-left attacks you increases. My recent record is five. My original piece on the alt-left for Foxnews.com generated hate messages in: email, Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. I even got angry phone ...
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Go west, young pine: US forests shifting with climate change 17.5.2017 AP Top News
WASHINGTON (AP) -- A warmer, wetter climate is helping push dozens of Eastern U.S. trees to the north and, surprisingly, west, a new study finds....
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Spotlight on green news & views: NYT hit on denier hire; ALEC & criminalizing eco-activists 14.5.2017 Daily Kos
This is the 498th edition of the Spotlight on Green News & Views (previously known as the Green Diary Rescue) usually appears twice a week, on Wednesdays and Saturdays. Here  is the May 10 Green Spotlight. More than 26,900 environmentally oriented stories have been rescued to appear in this series since 2006. Inclusion of a story in the Spotlight does not necessarily indicate my agreement with or endorsement of it. OUTSTANDING GREEN STORIES OceanDiver writes— The Daily Bucket - crossing paths with sea turtles : “Sea turtles are rare and gentle creatures. Occasionally I’ll cross paths with one when I’m diving in the Caribbean, and I respectfully pause to watch them calmly but purposefully cruising the depth. For one thing, I know they are holding their breath the whole time, but never look out of their element. They are air breathers like me but completely at home in the sea, their only time ashore crawling clumsily across a beach to lay eggs. They are vulnerable then, with most of their eggs doomed to be ...
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Climate change impacts Atlantic City while DC and the state of New Jersey do nothing 12.5.2017 Daily Kos
Atlantic City is in trouble and it's not just because of the declining casino revenue population. Its residents and businesses face a flooding crisis that has largely been ignored by the state and federal government. Though many Republicans refuse to believe that climate change is real, scientists have evidence that rising seas have had a specific and detrimental impact on lower-income neighborhoods and local governments have little money to help residents brace for continuing impact. But the federal government has done little to protect the residents of Arizona Avenue, or the millions of other working class and poor Americans who live near bays up and down the East Coast, from a worsening flooding crisis. Seas are rising as pollution from fossil fuel burning, forest losses and farming fuels global warming, melting ice and expanding ocean water. With municipal budgets stretched thin, lower-income neighborhoods built on low-lying land are enduring some of the worst impacts. Climate Central scientists ...
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Peat moss: Good for plants but bad for the planet? 11.5.2017 Washington Post
Peat moss: Good for plants but bad for the planet?
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Trump Failure to Lead on Climate Doesn't Faze UN Policymakers in Bonn 10.5.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Kaisa Kosonen, a political advisor on climate action for Greenpeace in Germany is prepping for the mid-year United Nations climate conference in Bonn, running May 8-18. But she pauses to answer my question. Here's the set up, I say: Under President Obama, the US played the lead role in global climate negotiations since 2014, drawing China into the fold, while pushing for the historic Paris Agreement in 2015, when 196 nations pledged to reduce their carbon footprint. Under President Trump, US leadership is waning, or could become oppositional, as the president allies himself with the fossil fuel industry and threatens withdrawal from Paris. China, meanwhile, looks poised to step into the leadership vacuum -- How concerned are you? Kosonen responds: "Obviously, we need the US to engage actively in solving this problem [of global warming]. And that's what a clear majority of Americans want, too, across party lines. But it doesn't seem like Trump will listen to his people, his top scientists or even  ...
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Trump signs order aimed at opening Arctic drilling 28.4.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Washington • Working to dismantle his predecessor’s environmental legacy, President Donald Trump signed an executive order on Friday aimed at expanding drilling in the Arctic and opening other federal areas to oil and gas exploration. With one day left to rack up accomplishments before he reaches his 100th day in office, Trump signed an order reversing some of former President Barack Obama’s restrictions and instructing Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke to review a plan that dictates which federal l...
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Trump seeks to expand drilling in oceans 28.4.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Washington • Working to dismantle his predecessor’s environmental legacy, President Donald Trump plans to sign an executive order Friday that could lead to the expansion of drilling in the Arctic and Atlantic oceans. With one day left to rack up accomplishments before he reaches his 100th day in office, Trump will order his interior secretary to review an Obama-era plan that dictates which locations are open to offshore drilling, with the goal of the new administration to expand operations. It’s... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Status of forests is 'dire' as world marks 2017 Earth Day 21.4.2017 LA Times: Commentary

They cover a third of the world’s landmass, help to regulate the atmosphere, and offer shelter, sustenance and survival to millions of people, plants and animals.

But despite some progress, the planet’s woodlands continue to disappear on a dramatic scale.

Since 1990 the world has lost the equivalent...

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This week in science: terminal reef 16.4.2017 Daily Kos
Coral reefs are a lot like the old growth forests of the sea. They offer a robust biological infrastructure for all manner of creatures to inhabit. Coral bleaching caused by climate change is like a forest fire to those trees. A forest can survive a fire, even a bad one. Root systems and seeds of all kinds, safe in the ground or carried in from elsewhere, will sprout and, over time, rebuild the forest. But if that same forest were swept by fire year after year, eventually it would never recover on time scales human can wrap our primate brains around. And a similar fate may consume the world’s greatest reefs if climate change is not halted: Scientists with the Australian Research Council’s Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies last week completed aerial surveys of the world’s largest living structure, scoring bleaching at 800 individual coral reefs across 8,000km. The results show the two consecutive mass bleaching events have affected a 1,500km stretch, leaving only the reef’s southern third ...
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What scientists do in Colorado’s federally backed climate science facilities 14.4.2017 Denver Post: All Political News
Scientists at federally funded facilities in Colorado conduct basic research aimed at understanding climate-change impacts — from worsening wildfires to uncertain water supplies — so that people can adapt.
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Spotlight on green news & views: Gearing up for April 29 climate march; unprotecting wildlife 13.4.2017 Daily Kos
This is the 495th edition of the Spotlight on Green News & Views (previously known as the Green Diary Rescue) usually appears twice a week, on Wednesdays and Saturdays.  Here is the April 5 Green Spotlight. More than 26,835 environmentally oriented stories have been rescued to appear in this series since 2006. Inclusion of a story in the Spotlight does not necessarily indicate my agreement with or endorsement of it. OUTSTANDING GREEN STORIES cwillis writes— 100th anniversary of the radium paint industry, in photos : “In April 1917, the United States entered World War I, and a massive industrial demand immediately arose for a product that had existed only as a scientific curiosity: paint that glowed in the dark.  Powered by the radioactive decay of radium, this toxic paint has a special prominence in the history of workplace safety regulation and workers’ compensation law in the United States.  The radium paint episode lies at the nexus of competing American traditions of corporate greed and progressive ...
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Spotlight on green news & views: Killing Chesapeake Bay; judge tosses jury award over fracking 6.4.2017 Daily Kos
This is the 494th edition of the Spotlight on Green News & Views (previously known as the Green Diary Rescue) usually appears twice a week, on Wednesdays and Saturdays. Here is the April 1 Green Spotlight. More than 26,790 environmentally oriented stories have been rescued to appear in this series since 2006. Inclusion of a story in the Spotlight does not necessarily indicate my agreement with or endorsement of it. OUTSTANDING GREEN STORIES terrypinder writes— Some random-a** stuff on infrastructure, cause it's Wednesday : “2. Human beings have an average round-trip commute time that's universal, going back to the Neolithic.  That time is one hour . No, really, it's true. It's called Marchetti's constant (although  Cesare Marchetti  attributes the finding to someone else--Yacov Zahavi, a transportation engineer who worked for the World Bank). How we travel may change, and how we plan our towns and cities may change, but this  constant remains remarkably consistent. One can see this even in US Census ...
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Thinning forests aims to reduce fire risk 3.4.2017 AP Washington
CLE ELUM, Wash. (AP) -- To restore a forest and reduce the risk of severe wildfires, a conservation group is cutting down trees....
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