User: khushpreet Topic: iihs_water_feed
Category: All-Channels :: Climate
Last updated: Aug 20 2018 12:02 IST RSS 2.0
 
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World's largest 3D-printed reef installed in Maldives to help save corals 20.8.2018 DNA: India
Could 3D printing save the planet's coral reefs? That's the theory behind an experimental project in the Maldives which aims to help coral reefs survive the ravages of climate change and warming waters.  Developed using computer modeling and a 3D printer at a lab in Melbourne, Australia, the artificial reef was designed to resemble reef structures typically found in the Maldives.  Printing the 3D molds took 24 hours. They were then cast in ceramic, an inert material similar to the calcium carbonate found in coral reefs, explains industrial designer Alex Goad of Reef Design Lab.  The molds were shipped to the Maldives, filled with concrete, assembled on-site at Summer Island and then submerged seven meters below the surface.  Live coral was then transplanted within the artificial reef, where it's hoped that within two to three years, it will grow and colonize the structure. With global warming, bleaching and environmental pollution, it's hoped that 3D printing technology can offer a new way of saving the ...
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Innovate in India, do it for humanity: PM Narendra Modi at IIT-B convocation in Mumbai 12.8.2018 DNA: Mumbai
Prime Minister Narendra Modi called IITs 'India's Instrument for Transformation' on Saturday while lauding the institutes for enriching Brand India globally and catapulting the nation to the forefront of the world's technological powerhouses. The Prime Minister, who was addressing the 56th annual convocation of the Indian Institute of Technology-Bombay (IIT-B), said reputable institutes such as IITs would steer the course of development with the keystones of innovation and enterprise. Underscoring sustainable development, the PM exhorted the students to "innovate in India, innovate for humanity" in areas ranging from mitigating climate change to enhancing agricultural productivity, generating cleaner energy and conserving water. "The nation is proud of IITs and what IIT graduates have achieved. Their success inspired engineering colleges across the country, and this made India one of the world's largest pools of technical manpower,'' he said, in his 32-minute speech. "We must build on this. We must make ...
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Cloud brightening, 'sun shields' to save Barrier Reef 23.7.2018 DNA: India
Australia announced plans to explore concepts such as firing salt into clouds and covering swathes of water with a thin layer of film in a bid to save the embattled Great Barrier Reef. The UNESCO World Heritage-listed reef, about the size of Japan or Italy, is reeling from two straight years of bleaching as sea temperatures rise because of climate change. Experts have warned that the 2,300-kilometre (1,400-mile) long area could have suffered irreparable damage. While the government has pledged to tackle climate change -- the greatest threat to the world's largest living structure -- there has also been a push to explore shorter-term measures to buy the reef some time. Canberra in January offered Aus$2.0 million (US$1.5 million) to attract innovative ideas to protect the site, which is also under pressure from farming runoff, development and the predatory crown-of-thorns starfish. Six schemes selected out of a total of 69 submissions will be tested to see if they are feasible. One selected concept is ...
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Deep reefs won't be 'twilight zone' refuge for fish, corals: Study 20.7.2018 DNA: Money
Deep coral reefs in a "twilight zone" in the oceans differ sharply from those near the surface, dimming hopes that they can be a refuge for marine life fleeing threats such as climate change and pollution, scientists said on Thursday. Worldwide, coral reefs in shallow waters are among ecosystems most threatened by climate change. The Great Barrier Reef off Australia suffered severe bleaching, a whitening driven by warm waters that can kill corals, in 2016 and 2017. A U.S.-led team of divers who studied little-known reefs in the West Atlantic and Pacific Oceans between 30 and 150 metres (100-500 ft) deep where sunlight fades, found most species of corals and fish were unlike those closer to the surface. "We were surprised to find little overlap," lead author Luiz Rocha of the California Academy of Sciences told Reuters of the findings published in the journal science. Less than five percent of fish and corals were found in both shallow and deep waters against the scientists' previous estimate of 60-75 ...
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African woman tells UN that climate change is security risk 12.7.2018 DNA: Bangalore
African woman tells UN that climate change is security risk
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‘Sustainable farming can help tackle climate change’ 27.6.2018 Hindu: Medicine & Research
Lecture series seeks to promote dialogue, create awareness
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National Waterway 1 will fail unless siltation issue is addressed, says Nitish Kumar 24.6.2018 Hindu: News
The flow and cleanliness of the river have been affected as the water had turned black at one place in Begusarai district, says the Bihar CM.
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When the hills go thirsty 24.6.2018 DNA: Top News
It is summertime and Shimla is a busy place. There are travellers to be checked-in, woollens to be sold at discounted 'summer' prices and tourists waiting to be shown around the mountain vistas. But, there is one thing whose mention is enough for everyone to pause and reflect on — water or the lack of it. There is an unconcealed unanimity across government offices, hotels and homes in the hill town, commercial establishments on the famous Mall Road and villages on the outskirts that the water crisis this summer is the worst that Shimla has ever faced. While the scarcity has always reared its head each summer, locals and experts admit that the acute crisis, which lasted over three weeks between May 20 and June 12, is unprecedented. "We did not have water for 15 days at a stretch. It was an ordeal for all of us in the neighbourhood. It was especially hard on all the women as taps ran dry even at the public toilets. We had to send our kids to relatives' homes in other cities," said Soma Jaiswal, 77, a ...
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U.S. lakes see rise in algal blooms 23.6.2018 Hindu: Fitness
The words blasted to cellphones around Oregon’s capital city were ominous- “Civil emergency . prepare for action.” Within half an hour, a second offi
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DNA Jaipur 10th Anniversary: Technological quick-fixes not a solution, says Sunita Narain 23.6.2018 DNA: India
The challenge of environmental management, of water scarcity in a world which is today more and more in an age of climate change is that of an uncertain future of the most vulnerable.  The fact is that on one hand we are building in floodplains, destroying our water bodies and filling up our water channels. On the other hand, climate change is beginning to show its impact on the monsoon. It is leading to more rain in a fewer number of rainy days, as scientists have predicted. We now see more rain and more extreme rain events.  Last year, up to mid-August, data showed that India had 16 extremely heavy rain events, defined as rainfall over 244 mm in a day, and 100 heavy rain events, defined as rainfall between 124 to 244 mm in a day. This means that rain will become a flood. Worse, in Met records, the rain will be shown as normal, not recognising that it did not rain when it was most needed for sowing or that the rain came in just one downpour. It came and went. It brought no benefits. Only grief. This ...
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Making India carbon-neutral 22.6.2018 Hindu: Religion
We must invest in mass public transport, sustainable constructions, and massive green cover, says Nidhi Adlakha
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World’s hungry population on the rise again, says UN report 21.6.2018 Hindu: National
Conflicts, climate change are main hurdles in meeting development goals
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A rice, lost and found 21.6.2018 Hindu: Home
The farmers of Ezhikkara, a local cooperative bank and a responsible travel company come together to revive the farming of Pokkali, a rice endemic to Kerala
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The seeds of sustainability 20.6.2018 Hindu: Health
How Zero Budget Natural Farming could be the model for the future
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‘Climate change increased rains’ 20.6.2018 Hindu: Policy & Issues
Monsoon withdrawal delayed over Central India
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Global warming cooks up ‘a different world’ over three decades 18.6.2018 Hindu: Energy & Environment
Earth is noticeably hotter, the weather stormier and more extreme.
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Mount Everest, the high-altitude rubbish dump 17.6.2018 Hindu: Internet
Environmentalists are concerned that the pollution on Everest is also affecting water sources down in the valley.
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In the last 25 years, Antarctica's ice has melted to cover Uttar Pradesh at least three times over 14.6.2018 DNA: Money
The melting of Antarctica is accelerating at an alarming rate, with about 3 trillion tons of ice disappearing since 1992, an international team of ice experts said in a new study. In the last quarter century, the southern-most continent's ice sheet a key indicator of climate change melted into enough water to cover Uttar Pradesh nearly three times over to a depth of nearly 13 feet (4 metres), scientists calculated. All that water made global oceans rise about three-tenths of an inch (7.6 millimetres). From 1992 to 2011, Antarctica lost nearly 84 billion tons of ice a year (76 billion metric tons). From 2012 to 2017, the melt rate increased to more than 241 billion tons a year (219 billion metric tons), according to the study Wednesday in the journal Nature . "I think we should be worried. That doesn't mean we should be desperate," said University of California Irvine's Isabella Velicogna, one of 88 co-authors. "Things are happening. They are happening faster than we expected." Part of West Antarctica, ...
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Flood damage would double without coral reefs: study 13.6.2018 Hindu: Fitness
Coupled with projected sea level rise driven by global warming, reef decline could see flooding increase four-fold by century's end, warn researchers
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Fishermen oppose CRZ draft 12.6.2018 Hindu: Rx
Write to Ministry, claim proposed changes would adversely affect their livelihood
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