User: irge304 Topic: Urban Waste
Category: Waste Management :: Composting
Last updated: May 28 2016 24:04 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Community Agriculture Alliance: Routt County's bear season has arrived 27.5.2016 Steamboat Pilot
We are fortunate our community can produce and sustain a number of healthy and valuable food sources, including chickens, sheep, calves, pigs, goats and honey. Unfortunately, along with unsecured trash, bird feeders and pet food left outdoors, livestock can also be become attractants for bears. With a nose 100 times more sensitive than a human's, it does not take much to get the attention of a hungry bear. Regrettably, that nose often leads them to easy, human-provided meals, whether it’s a chicken coop, trash can, cooler, pet food left inside a vehicle or even a compost pile. Because bears have great memories, once they receive a food reward from humans, they will likely lose their natural fear of people and return in search of more. It's unfortunate, but a bear that is comfortable around people often ends up dead, either from road collisions, electrocutions on a utility pole, landowners protecting livestock or a wildlife manager acting to protect human health and safety. To prevent losses and conflicts ...
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A homeowner plants community in her Eastlake garden 27.5.2016 Seattle Times: Top stories

Interior designer Mary Hansen treats passers-by with a creative urban farmscape that puts every inch of land to good use.
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Master gardener recommends mixture of vermiculite, blended compost and peat moss 21.5.2016 Steamboat Pilot
Tegan Anderson has only recently figured out how to coax vegetables into growing in Routt County, but her display on how to make a “salad bowl garden” was among the most popular May 19 when the Master Gardeners from Routt County CSU Extension hosted an audience of more than 30 people at Bud Werner Memorial Library intent on growing their own food on small plots of land, or even no land at all. Anderson has only lived in Routt County a little more than a year, and though she was an experienced gardener when she arrived, she quickly learned that Steamboat’s growing season of 39 frost-free days, combined with clay soils and desiccating winds, presents its own set of problems. So, she enrolled in classes through the extension office and recently became a freshly picked Master Gardener. She was brimming with confidence last week as she showed off a couple of small tabletop planters stuffed with ready-to-pick salad lettuce that were planted indoors just three weeks ago. If ever there was a “spring” in which ...
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Kaiser to end its global warming emissions by 2025 17.5.2016 SFGate: Business & Technology
Kaiser Permanente on Tuesday will unveil an aggressive environmental plan that, by 2025, will slash the hospital system’s water use, recycle or compost all of its non-hazardous waste and eliminate or offset its greenhouse gas emissions. “Our aim with these new goals is to go beyond eliminating our own environmental impact to help restore, renew and revitalize our communities,” said Raymond Baxter, Kaiser’s senior vice president of community benefit, research and health policy, in a press release. In 2012, Kaiser vowed to cut its greenhouse gas emissions 30 percent by 2020. The health care organization now says it should reach that level by 2017, so the new goals set a far more ambitious target.
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Is organic agriculture really better for the environment? 15.5.2016 Washington Post
Is organic agriculture really better for the environment?
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Why grow your own mushrooms? Because they're delicious 14.5.2016 LA Times: Commentary

It all started with a bag of mushroom compost bought from Cliff Kane, a grower who sells shiitake and blue oyster mushrooms at the Echo Park Farmers' Market.

I had planned on using it for my own compost pile, but Kane said if it was kept moist then it was possible another flush of mushrooms would...

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Hawaii plan would offset cost of organic farm certification 10.5.2016 Seattle Times: Business & Technology

WAIMANALO, Hawaii (AP) — On a farm tucked under the lush Koolau Mountains, Sean Anderson tends his passion fruit, kale and salad greens using only what nature provides. He creates his own compost and fertilizers, and doesn’t use chemicals. But he’s not certified as an organic farmer because the cost of getting certification is too […]
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Hawaii plan would offset cost of organic farm certification 10.5.2016 AP National
WAIMANALO, Hawaii (AP) -- On a farm tucked under the lush Koolau Mountains, Sean Anderson tends his passion fruit, kale and salad greens using only what nature provides....
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Respecting the Earth, even in death: Seattle architect proposes human composting 8.5.2016 Seattle Times: Local

Conventional options of burial or cremation when we die don’t meet Katrina Spade’s values of not polluting or using up more of the planet’s resources. She founded the Urban Death Project to promote human composting, more swiftly returning our bodies to soil, to enrich the Earth.
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Gardens: tomato cuttings that’ll shoot up 8.5.2016 The Guardian -- Front Page
The side shoots on a tomato plant make fantastic cuttings – so think before you throw them away If you are anything like me, at this time of year your windowsills will be covered with little tomato plants just beginning to produce their very first side shoots. Conventional wisdom says to nip out these lateral shoots that spring up at the axils, where the leaves meet the stem, in order to concentrate the plant’s energy on producing fruit. Unlike many pieces of received gardening wisdom, this advice is well supported by trials and scientific evidence, giving you larger fruit and earlier harvests. It’s what it says to do next, confining these shoots to the compost bin, that I think is a missed opportunity. You see, the vigour that makes these lateral shoots a drain on the parent plant’s energies also means they make fantastic cuttings. Being packed full of growth hormones, they are super easy to root and their incredibly rapid growth rate means they often catch up with their parent plants within as little ...
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Nigel Slater’s rhubarb recipes 1.5.2016 The Guardian -- Front Page

Rhubarb brings a splash of colour to our gardens – and our cooking. Try these recipes, both sweet and savoury

There was always a rhubarb patch. Every garden in our street had one, usually at the end of the garden path, down by the compost heap. I never heard of anyone buying a new plant – the crowns with their tangle of roots were passed from house to house. A neighbourly gift of crumble to be, or chutney in waiting.

Rhubarb has never worked in my London garden, despite its sweet, rich soil. I tried several varieties and numerous locations: the sunny side, the shaded border, even the damp patch (no one wants the damp patch). But I never managed more than enough for a single tart.

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State court partly blocks Seattle trash recycling/composting requirements, because of risk of unconstitutional searches 28.4.2016 Washington Post: Op-Eds
State court partly blocks Seattle trash recycling/composting requirements, because of risk of unconstitutional searches
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Could carbon farming be the answer for a 'clapped-out' Australia? 28.4.2016 Guardian: Environment

Farmers signing up for the carbon emissions reduction fund have to meet strict guidelines but there is significant profit and energy savings to be made

This week the Clean Energy Regulator (CER) will hold the third emissions reduction fund auction and farmers across Australia will move to the forefront of efforts to rescue a “clapped-out” country.

Australian farmers have long bought and sold their wares at auction. Sale yards were the hub of country towns and the din of a moleskin-clad auctioneer shouting over the bleating and mooing of fattened livestock has long been a familiar rural backdrop.

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10 of the best glamping sites in the UK 26.4.2016 The Guardian -- Front Page
Camping purists may sneer but glamping is here to stay with hundreds of sites scattered across the UK. We pick 10 additions to Cool Camping’s new book, Glamping Getaways Two yurts and an octagonal “caban” (pictured above) accompany a handful of tent pitches at Graig Wen on the banks of the Mawddach estuary. Each is furnished with Welsh blankets and wood burners, and windows in the cabin walls provide a 360-degree view of the pines beyond. It’s a short walk for the most dramatic river views, and you can cycle road-free all the way to Fairbourne beach, climb Snowdonia’s Cader Idris directly from the site, or drive the 10 minutes to Snowden. • Yurts for two/five people from £100/£190 for two nights, caban (sleeps 2) from £160 for two nights midweek, more at weekends, 01341 ...
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Straw bale gardens 26.4.2016 Steamboat Pilot
With no shortage of straw in the Yampa Valley, add productive garden space and raise your planting bed with straw bale gardening. Gaining new popularity thanks to Joel Karsten’s book “Straw Bale Gardens,” the technique allows gardeners to create raised bed gardens on a patio, lawn or any area with poor compacted soil. All you need are a few straw bales, fertilizer, a bit of compost and time to condition, plant and water the garden. Procurement and preparation Purchase straw bales made from alfalfa, wheat, oats, rye or other cereal grain that have less weed seeds than hay. Start a few weeks before the designated planting date. Place the bales in their permanent location with the cut sides up and twine parallel to the ground. Once you start the condition process, the bales will be very heavy and hard to move. When the bales are in place, start the conditioning process to start the inside of the straw bales composting, so they’ll support plant growth. On day one, spread fertilizer over the top of the ...
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The siren song of the garden centre 23.4.2016 The Guardian -- Front Page

A trip to the local garden centre for one bag of compost can quickly turn into a spending spree. But who needs a dibber when you have a perfectly good finger?

It’s spring and our garden centres are at their busiest: tools are tidily lined up, garden furniture has been moved near the entrance, and bedding plants by the thousands are tiered on shelves like strange horticultural cakes. The gardening industry waits all year for these few months. It doesn’t matter about the weather, it’s time to sell, sell, sell. And I don’t blame them – it’s an industry which is worth around £5bn a year.

Related: Shopping for plants and seeds? Get the best deals without forking out too much

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Zero-waste bloggers: the millennials who can fit a year's worth of trash in a jar 22.4.2016 Guardian: Environment
These bloggers treasure taking a sleek, modern approach to reducing waste in their efforts to save the planet – but they face their fair share of criticism, too Kathryn Kellogg, a 25-year-old print shop employee, spends four hours a day on her lifestyle blog Going Zero Waste . She posts on Instagram, engages with Facebook followers, and writes about homemade eyeliner and lip balm, worm composting, and shopping bulk bins – anything to avoid unnecessary waste. Her trash for the past year – anything that hasn’t been composted or recycled – fits in an 8oz jar. Kellogg is earnest, enthusiastic, and admittedly still figuring out what it means to be zero waste. The aspiring actor has also weathered her fair share of criticism. “I’m not even that big yet and I get so much hate mail,” says Kellogg, who draws 10,000 unique page views a month and has 800 ...
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How to produce nearly zero trash in a year – in pictures 22.4.2016 Guardian: Environment

Kathryn Kellogg aims to reduce the amount of waste she produces to almost nothing. She buys secondhand, uses cloth bags and glass jars for shopping, composts leftovers, and views recycling as a last resort. It takes great determination, but being vegetarian and lactose-intolerant helps

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Community Agriculture Alliance: Why we need to talk about food waste 22.4.2016 Steamboat Pilot
We all eat. Unfortunately, we all throw away food. Every year, 40 percent of food produced in the United States is thrown away. When one in eight Colorado residents are food insecure, there needs to be more awareness about how food waste can be diverted to the people who need it. Food waste has major environmental, social and economic implications. Food waste is the No. 1 item in landfills, which creates massive amounts of methane emissions from rotting foods. With 8 percent of Routt County residents living below the poverty line, all of the perfectly good food that goes to waste in landfills should be rerouted to families in need. In addition to the environmental and social impacts of food waste, there is also an economic impact of throwing away food. All the water used to grow it, fuel used to transport it, and other resources that go into food production go straight into the landfills and not to hungry people. No one wants to waste food, yet every day, businesses, restaurants, schools and homes toss ...
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Dog's Eye View: This recipe has not changed 22.4.2016 Steamboat Pilot
I’ve written and published more than once on this topic, and hopefully, this awareness is beginning to grow. The snow is melting in our parks and on our trails, creating a horrible, unsightly feces soup. All that snow drains into our beautiful Yampa River or soaks into the soil along walking paths and in our parks. Large scale corporations are being held accountable for contaminating our environment, and we all agree that they should do their part to keep our environment safe and clean or pay the consequence. Yet, many of those same people who cry out for justice think it’s just fine to let mother nature take care of composting their dogs’ poop. But, allowing your dog to poop in a public place and not cleaning it up is creating an environmental disaster. Think about it: My two dog’s poop twice per day, sometimes more. That constitutes up to 800 piles per year. I keep my dog yard cleaned up and carry waste bags with me all the time. I know where those piles end up; in a landfill far away from rivers and ...
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