User: irge304 Topic: Urban Waste
Category: Waste Management :: Composting
Last updated: Jun 29 2016 02:36 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Colorado Master Gardeners: Composting in the Yampa Valley 29.6.2016 Steamboat Pilot
Compost: to rot your unused organic material in a way that it can be used as a compliment and amendment to existing soil. Composting in rural Colorado — a region robust with wildlife and challenged by severe weather — can be tricky, but it can be done. And it should be. Composting is a very important factor in the sustainability of our existence, as it both reduces our waste and impact on the environment and improves our depleted soil, which, in turn, improves our environment. The how is the challenge, but it’s easier than you might think. Compost is a natural process of organic decomposition, and if done right, it will not attract wildlife or pests, will not be affected by weather, and will provide you with an amazing, free amendment for your soil. Items you will need include the following. • A bin — This can be purchased or homemade, but should be no bigger than one cubic yard. • A starter pile — This should include two parts woody or brown material (dried leaves, sticks, straw, etc) and one part ...
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Authorities ID slain suspect, officer in Pueblo officer-involved shooting 16.6.2016 Denver Post: News: Local
Authorities in Pueblo have released the name of a suspect slain in a police shooting last week and also identified the officer who killed him.
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Boulder property owners now required to compost 16.6.2016 Denver Post: News: Local
Beginning Thursday, all property owners in Boulder — both commercial and residential — must offer their tenants compost collection containers.
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Livewell Northwest Colorado: It takes a community 12.6.2016 Steamboat Pilot
Despite Steamboat’s epic winters, the more I talk with people in this community, the more I think spring is one of the most popular seasons in the Yampa Valley. People are energized and excited for the change in season and time of buds and blossoms, renewed hope and anticipation for summer. Spring is different for everyone — for some, it’s all about hitting the trails and exploring the woods; for others, it’s about planting seeds, gardening, enjoying flowers and soaking up the highly anticipated warmer weather. Our community’s energy, commitment and support for nonprofits continue to impress me as no other town I have lived in. The recent United Day of Caring linked us up with more than a dozen hard-working employees from Ski Corp., who joined us at Yampatika’s Environmental Learning Center at Legacy Ranch. Blankets of straw were pulled back from the gardens as they were prepared and planted with care. Some helped to revitalize a compost pile, while others cleared out large sections of weeds around ...
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10 secrets to growing the tastiest tomatoes 11.6.2016 LA Times: Commentary

Want to win this year's tomato games?

Then you might want to buy some more tomato plants.

You probably put in your tomato plants in April or May, and that's great.

Tomato plants do best in the hot, full sun, but their tender blossoms wither and drop when temperatures are consistently above 95 degrees....

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Volunteers needed for Zero Waste events 7.6.2016 Steamboat Pilot
Yampa Valley Sustainability Council (YVSC) Zero Hero volunteers are key to making more than 50 large community events waste-free, such as Free Summer Concerts and the Farmers Market. Volunteers set up, staff and break down the Zero Waste stations, with each volunteer typically donating about three hours of time. Diverting items from the landfill requires a crew of as many as 20 people for some events. YVSC is offering a training for Zero Waste volunteers from noon to 1 p.m. Thursday, June 9 at the YVSC office, 141 Ninth St. Attendees will learn about why recycling is challenging in rural Northwest Colorado, what the difference is between industrial and residential composting, what is compostable, what is recyclable, why Zero Waste is good for the environment and much more. All ages are welcome. Email larisa@yvsc.org or call 970-871-9299 for more information. Visit www.yvsc.org/volunteer to view Zero Waste volunteer ...
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In San Ignacio Lagoon, Mexico, the whales are so close you could kiss them - or at least try 6.6.2016 LA Times: Commentary

San Ignacio Lagoon, Mexico —There are whale people — and then there's the rest of the world.

Whale people don't always signal their status, although some can be seen sporting fluke earrings or T-shirts with sayings such as  "I speak whale." If you need to find a member of the Cetacean Nation in...

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Community Agriculture Alliance: Routt County's bear season has arrived 27.5.2016 Steamboat Pilot
We are fortunate our community can produce and sustain a number of healthy and valuable food sources, including chickens, sheep, calves, pigs, goats and honey. Unfortunately, along with unsecured trash, bird feeders and pet food left outdoors, livestock can also be become attractants for bears. With a nose 100 times more sensitive than a human's, it does not take much to get the attention of a hungry bear. Regrettably, that nose often leads them to easy, human-provided meals, whether it’s a chicken coop, trash can, cooler, pet food left inside a vehicle or even a compost pile. Because bears have great memories, once they receive a food reward from humans, they will likely lose their natural fear of people and return in search of more. It's unfortunate, but a bear that is comfortable around people often ends up dead, either from road collisions, electrocutions on a utility pole, landowners protecting livestock or a wildlife manager acting to protect human health and safety. To prevent losses and conflicts ...
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A homeowner plants community in her Eastlake garden 27.5.2016 Seattle Times: Top stories

Interior designer Mary Hansen treats passers-by with a creative urban farmscape that puts every inch of land to good use.
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Master gardener recommends mixture of vermiculite, blended compost and peat moss 21.5.2016 Steamboat Pilot
Tegan Anderson has only recently figured out how to coax vegetables into growing in Routt County, but her display on how to make a “salad bowl garden” was among the most popular May 19 when the Master Gardeners from Routt County CSU Extension hosted an audience of more than 30 people at Bud Werner Memorial Library intent on growing their own food on small plots of land, or even no land at all. Anderson has only lived in Routt County a little more than a year, and though she was an experienced gardener when she arrived, she quickly learned that Steamboat’s growing season of 39 frost-free days, combined with clay soils and desiccating winds, presents its own set of problems. So, she enrolled in classes through the extension office and recently became a freshly picked Master Gardener. She was brimming with confidence last week as she showed off a couple of small tabletop planters stuffed with ready-to-pick salad lettuce that were planted indoors just three weeks ago. If ever there was a “spring” in which ...
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Kaiser to end its global warming emissions by 2025 17.5.2016 SFGate: Business & Technology
Kaiser Permanente on Tuesday will unveil an aggressive environmental plan that, by 2025, will slash the hospital system’s water use, recycle or compost all of its non-hazardous waste and eliminate or offset its greenhouse gas emissions. “Our aim with these new goals is to go beyond eliminating our own environmental impact to help restore, renew and revitalize our communities,” said Raymond Baxter, Kaiser’s senior vice president of community benefit, research and health policy, in a press release. In 2012, Kaiser vowed to cut its greenhouse gas emissions 30 percent by 2020. The health care organization now says it should reach that level by 2017, so the new goals set a far more ambitious target.
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Is organic agriculture really better for the environment? 15.5.2016 Washington Post
Is organic agriculture really better for the environment?
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Why grow your own mushrooms? Because they're delicious 14.5.2016 LA Times: Commentary

It all started with a bag of mushroom compost bought from Cliff Kane, a grower who sells shiitake and blue oyster mushrooms at the Echo Park Farmers' Market.

I had planned on using it for my own compost pile, but Kane said if it was kept moist then it was possible another flush of mushrooms would...

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Hawaii plan would offset cost of organic farm certification 10.5.2016 Seattle Times: Business & Technology

WAIMANALO, Hawaii (AP) — On a farm tucked under the lush Koolau Mountains, Sean Anderson tends his passion fruit, kale and salad greens using only what nature provides. He creates his own compost and fertilizers, and doesn’t use chemicals. But he’s not certified as an organic farmer because the cost of getting certification is too […]
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Hawaii plan would offset cost of organic farm certification 10.5.2016 AP National
WAIMANALO, Hawaii (AP) -- On a farm tucked under the lush Koolau Mountains, Sean Anderson tends his passion fruit, kale and salad greens using only what nature provides....
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Respecting the Earth, even in death: Seattle architect proposes human composting 8.5.2016 Seattle Times: Local

Conventional options of burial or cremation when we die don’t meet Katrina Spade’s values of not polluting or using up more of the planet’s resources. She founded the Urban Death Project to promote human composting, more swiftly returning our bodies to soil, to enrich the Earth.
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Gardens: tomato cuttings that’ll shoot up 8.5.2016 The Guardian -- Front Page
The side shoots on a tomato plant make fantastic cuttings – so think before you throw them away If you are anything like me, at this time of year your windowsills will be covered with little tomato plants just beginning to produce their very first side shoots. Conventional wisdom says to nip out these lateral shoots that spring up at the axils, where the leaves meet the stem, in order to concentrate the plant’s energy on producing fruit. Unlike many pieces of received gardening wisdom, this advice is well supported by trials and scientific evidence, giving you larger fruit and earlier harvests. It’s what it says to do next, confining these shoots to the compost bin, that I think is a missed opportunity. You see, the vigour that makes these lateral shoots a drain on the parent plant’s energies also means they make fantastic cuttings. Being packed full of growth hormones, they are super easy to root and their incredibly rapid growth rate means they often catch up with their parent plants within as little ...
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Nigel Slater’s rhubarb recipes 1.5.2016 The Guardian -- Front Page

Rhubarb brings a splash of colour to our gardens – and our cooking. Try these recipes, both sweet and savoury

There was always a rhubarb patch. Every garden in our street had one, usually at the end of the garden path, down by the compost heap. I never heard of anyone buying a new plant – the crowns with their tangle of roots were passed from house to house. A neighbourly gift of crumble to be, or chutney in waiting.

Rhubarb has never worked in my London garden, despite its sweet, rich soil. I tried several varieties and numerous locations: the sunny side, the shaded border, even the damp patch (no one wants the damp patch). But I never managed more than enough for a single tart.

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State court partly blocks Seattle trash recycling/composting requirements, because of risk of unconstitutional searches 28.4.2016 Washington Post: Op-Eds
State court partly blocks Seattle trash recycling/composting requirements, because of risk of unconstitutional searches
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Could carbon farming be the answer for a 'clapped-out' Australia? 28.4.2016 Guardian: Environment

Farmers signing up for the carbon emissions reduction fund have to meet strict guidelines but there is significant profit and energy savings to be made

This week the Clean Energy Regulator (CER) will hold the third emissions reduction fund auction and farmers across Australia will move to the forefront of efforts to rescue a “clapped-out” country.

Australian farmers have long bought and sold their wares at auction. Sale yards were the hub of country towns and the din of a moleskin-clad auctioneer shouting over the bleating and mooing of fattened livestock has long been a familiar rural backdrop.

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