User: irge304 Topic: Urban Waste
Category: Waste Management :: Composting
Last updated: Apr 29 2016 24:40 IST RSS 2.0
 
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State court partly blocks Seattle trash recycling/composting requirements, because of risk of unconstitutional searches 28.4.2016 Washington Post: Op-Eds
State court partly blocks Seattle trash recycling/composting requirements, because of risk of unconstitutional searches
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Could carbon farming be the answer for a 'clapped-out' Australia? 28.4.2016 Guardian: Environment

Farmers signing up for the carbon emissions reduction fund have to meet strict guidelines but there is significant profit and energy savings to be made

This week the Clean Energy Regulator (CER) will hold the third emissions reduction fund auction and farmers across Australia will move to the forefront of efforts to rescue a “clapped-out” country.

Australian farmers have long bought and sold their wares at auction. Sale yards were the hub of country towns and the din of a moleskin-clad auctioneer shouting over the bleating and mooing of fattened livestock has long been a familiar rural backdrop.

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10 of the best glamping sites in the UK 26.4.2016 The Guardian -- Front Page
Camping purists may sneer but glamping is here to stay with hundreds of sites scattered across the UK. We pick 10 additions to Cool Camping’s new book, Glamping Getaways Two yurts and an octagonal “caban” (pictured above) accompany a handful of tent pitches at Graig Wen on the banks of the Mawddach estuary. Each is furnished with Welsh blankets and wood burners, and windows in the cabin walls provide a 360-degree view of the pines beyond. It’s a short walk for the most dramatic river views, and you can cycle road-free all the way to Fairbourne beach, climb Snowdonia’s Cader Idris directly from the site, or drive the 10 minutes to Snowden. • Yurts for two/five people from £100/£190 for two nights, caban (sleeps 2) from £160 for two nights midweek, more at weekends, 01341 ...
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Straw bale gardens 26.4.2016 Steamboat Pilot
With no shortage of straw in the Yampa Valley, add productive garden space and raise your planting bed with straw bale gardening. Gaining new popularity thanks to Joel Karsten’s book “Straw Bale Gardens,” the technique allows gardeners to create raised bed gardens on a patio, lawn or any area with poor compacted soil. All you need are a few straw bales, fertilizer, a bit of compost and time to condition, plant and water the garden. Procurement and preparation Purchase straw bales made from alfalfa, wheat, oats, rye or other cereal grain that have less weed seeds than hay. Start a few weeks before the designated planting date. Place the bales in their permanent location with the cut sides up and twine parallel to the ground. Once you start the condition process, the bales will be very heavy and hard to move. When the bales are in place, start the conditioning process to start the inside of the straw bales composting, so they’ll support plant growth. On day one, spread fertilizer over the top of the ...
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The siren song of the garden centre 23.4.2016 The Guardian -- Front Page

A trip to the local garden centre for one bag of compost can quickly turn into a spending spree. But who needs a dibber when you have a perfectly good finger?

It’s spring and our garden centres are at their busiest: tools are tidily lined up, garden furniture has been moved near the entrance, and bedding plants by the thousands are tiered on shelves like strange horticultural cakes. The gardening industry waits all year for these few months. It doesn’t matter about the weather, it’s time to sell, sell, sell. And I don’t blame them – it’s an industry which is worth around £5bn a year.

Related: Shopping for plants and seeds? Get the best deals without forking out too much

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Zero-waste bloggers: the millennials who can fit a year's worth of trash in a jar 22.4.2016 Guardian: Environment
These bloggers treasure taking a sleek, modern approach to reducing waste in their efforts to save the planet – but they face their fair share of criticism, too Kathryn Kellogg, a 25-year-old print shop employee, spends four hours a day on her lifestyle blog Going Zero Waste . She posts on Instagram, engages with Facebook followers, and writes about homemade eyeliner and lip balm, worm composting, and shopping bulk bins – anything to avoid unnecessary waste. Her trash for the past year – anything that hasn’t been composted or recycled – fits in an 8oz jar. Kellogg is earnest, enthusiastic, and admittedly still figuring out what it means to be zero waste. The aspiring actor has also weathered her fair share of criticism. “I’m not even that big yet and I get so much hate mail,” says Kellogg, who draws 10,000 unique page views a month and has 800 ...
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How to produce nearly zero trash in a year – in pictures 22.4.2016 Guardian: Environment

Kathryn Kellogg aims to reduce the amount of waste she produces to almost nothing. She buys secondhand, uses cloth bags and glass jars for shopping, composts leftovers, and views recycling as a last resort. It takes great determination, but being vegetarian and lactose-intolerant helps

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Community Agriculture Alliance: Why we need to talk about food waste 22.4.2016 Steamboat Pilot
We all eat. Unfortunately, we all throw away food. Every year, 40 percent of food produced in the United States is thrown away. When one in eight Colorado residents are food insecure, there needs to be more awareness about how food waste can be diverted to the people who need it. Food waste has major environmental, social and economic implications. Food waste is the No. 1 item in landfills, which creates massive amounts of methane emissions from rotting foods. With 8 percent of Routt County residents living below the poverty line, all of the perfectly good food that goes to waste in landfills should be rerouted to families in need. In addition to the environmental and social impacts of food waste, there is also an economic impact of throwing away food. All the water used to grow it, fuel used to transport it, and other resources that go into food production go straight into the landfills and not to hungry people. No one wants to waste food, yet every day, businesses, restaurants, schools and homes toss ...
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Dog's Eye View: This recipe has not changed 22.4.2016 Steamboat Pilot
I’ve written and published more than once on this topic, and hopefully, this awareness is beginning to grow. The snow is melting in our parks and on our trails, creating a horrible, unsightly feces soup. All that snow drains into our beautiful Yampa River or soaks into the soil along walking paths and in our parks. Large scale corporations are being held accountable for contaminating our environment, and we all agree that they should do their part to keep our environment safe and clean or pay the consequence. Yet, many of those same people who cry out for justice think it’s just fine to let mother nature take care of composting their dogs’ poop. But, allowing your dog to poop in a public place and not cleaning it up is creating an environmental disaster. Think about it: My two dog’s poop twice per day, sometimes more. That constitutes up to 800 piles per year. I keep my dog yard cleaned up and carry waste bags with me all the time. I know where those piles end up; in a landfill far away from rivers and ...
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Talking Green program focuses on SmartWool's approach to sustainability 21.4.2016 Steamboat Pilot
If someone buried wool in an active compost pile, little would be left under that dirt in six months. “Wool is a natural fiber that biodegrades over time. If we buried a 100 percent wool garment for six months, it would lose a substantial percent of its wool mass to bio-deterioration,” explained Anne Duane, quality assurance manager at SmartWool, which is headquartered next to Steamboat Springs Airport. Making clothing composed mostly of natural fibers is one part of the corporate sustainability efforts at the company that was started locally in 1994 and has since grown to a global brand selling in 37 countries worldwide. Duane will discuss the sustainability successes and challenges of SmartWool as part of the “How Green is Your Sweater” educational program for the Yampa Valley Sustainability Council’s next Talking Green at 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 26 upstairs at Aurum Food & Wine, 811 Yampa St. With 67 employees at its global headquarters in Steamboat, SmartWool is an industry leader in active ...
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Earth Day checklist: five simple things you can do to make a difference 19.4.2016 Guardian: Environment

Celebrating Earth Day on 22 April is nice, but is one day truly enough? Madeleine Somerville describes five small lifestyle shifts that will make a big impact

One of the questions I receive most frequently from readers is whether our individual actions truly make a difference. If you choose to recycle, compost, carpool, reduce consumption and refuse plastic bags, does it have an effect? Does it matter at all? Will it do anything to eliminate the Great Pacific garbage patch?

The answer is yes.

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Mercer Island celebrates with a Leap for Green festival 17.4.2016 Seattle Times: Local

Leap For Green, a family fair promoting sustainability and environmentally sound practices, was held Saturday on Mercer Island.
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How to grow perfect potatoes | Alys Fowler 16.4.2016 The Guardian -- Front Page
Alys Fowler on one of the best container vegetables – they’re easy and reliable, but how do you plant and prepare for early and later varieties? The joy of hunting for new potatoes in a pot full of compost is childishly thrilling. I am always excited by the prospect of tipping over a pot to find this edible gold. For this reason, I think they are one of the best container vegetables: easy, reliable and very tasty. All you need is a large pot, 20 litres (the size of a florist’s bucket) or more, some compost and a few seed potatoes. Potatoes are categorised by the time they take to mature. Earlies are usually planted in March and make new potatoes. These tend to be ready in June and July. Second earlies go in early to mid-April and are ready in July and August, and main crops are planted in mid- to late April and are ready from August to October. There is nothing to stop you planting your earlies now – you’ll just get a later succession. You can plant right up to June, as long as your seed potatoes have ...
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Lawsuit: Seattle compost ordinance is rotten 16.4.2016 AP Washington
SEATTLE (AP) -- A Seattle ordinance that bars people from throwing their coffee grounds, pizza scraps and other potential compost into their trash cans is being challenged by critics who say the liberal city is turning garbage collectors into trash investigators....
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Fertilizer company rakes in $12.3 million in funding 12.4.2016 Seattle Times: Business & Technology

WISErg makes a machine it calls the Harvester to turn food scraps into liquid plant fertilizer. The company works with universities and farms to test the fertilizer.
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Drone's eye view of my familiar patch 11.4.2016 Guardian: Environment
Holmes Chapel, Cheshire Drones make brief, veering, playful flights, revealing the familiar from fresh angles Rough ground looks like chenille, softly tactile, from 20 metres up. A puddle blinks back whitely, a fallen fragment of sky. I can’t absorb what I’m seeing fast enough. The land beneath me rolls away and the horizon pulls near, creating a sense of adventurous possibility. I’m used to trudging about the garden, hauling sacks of compost, dragging wheelbarrows over gravel; this, by contrast, feels like freedom. Hoping for deeper knowledge of my garden, a hectare (2.47 acres) of former farmland on the Cheshire plain , I’ve acquired a small drone with a camera. Drones make brief, veering, playful flights, revealing the familiar from fresh angles. Mine seems more like a kite or a bird than a human with wings: it’s heedless of paths, happiest in ascent, sensitive to the breeze. When it skims the ground it glides over obstacles with grace and purpose, motors no louder than a couple of bumblebees ...
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Earth’s soils could play key role in locking away greenhouse gases 8.4.2016 New Kerala: World News
London, Apr 8 : The world's soils could potentially store an extra 8 billion tonnes of greenhouse gases, helping to limit the impacts of climate change, says a new study from a team including Professor Pete Smith from the University of Aberdeen.
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Students in Durango investigate food waste for Earth Day project 6.4.2016 Durango Herald
Food is wasted at every step in its production from the farm to dinner tables. To help curb the problem locally, some middle school students are exploring the issue for a mini-documentary.“We could save the Earth by not having food waste,” said Mia Baguskas, a sixth-grader who was recently researching her...
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How Colorado Is Turning Food Waste Into Electricity 5.4.2016 NPR News
At the Heartland Biogas Project, spoiled milk, old pet food and vats of grease combine with helpful bacteria in massive tanks to generate gas. It's all thanks to anaerobic digestion.
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The free-from restaurant boom that's cashing in by stripping back 1.4.2016 Guardian: Environment

Whether it’s gluten, sugar, nuts, eggs, waste or even carbon, today’s most successful restaurants care as much about what’s off the menu as what’s on it

Remember when vegetarian restaurants were a novelty? Or even vegan restaurants? Now it’s barely worth noting when there are so many other free-from options to trumpet.

From chains such as Wahaca, which has announced that it is carbon-neutral, all the way to Michelin-starred restaurants, in the last few months an ever-growing number of places are accentuating the negatives – the things you won’t find at their restaurants – over what you will.

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