User: irge304 Topic: Urban Waste
Category: Waste Management :: Composting
Last updated: Jun 28 2015 16:43 IST RSS 2.0
 
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A passport to my lovely garden? Dream on, you wretched souls 28.6.2015 Guardian: Comment is Free
‘I put a really big flowerpot on the manhole cover so that the people without gardens couldn’t get into my garden through their hole’ Late in my life I have become the owner of a house with a garden. But there are very few gardens in the area of the inner city where I live and naturally my garden has become a focus of envy from the deserving poor. Last Sunday I was in my garden, drinking fine champagne from the bottle and playing croquet on the lawn with my pantalooned children, when I began to notice some of the people with no gardens from other less salubrious parts of the borough straddling my fence. They were probably jealous of my lawn and flowerbeds, and wished they could have them, which they can’t because they are mine and I must deserve them otherwise why would they have come into my ...
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Glastonbury: Instagram beer for 1D and trolls for the Dalai Lama 28.6.2015 The Guardian -- Front Page
Worthy Farm’s temporary residents are tweeting furiously – probably because they hate music, sunshine and fun Is anyone reading this? I only ask because it seems as if every left-liberal with an iPhone and an interest in composting toilets is at Glastonbury this weekend, and that group probably has a healthy crossover with “readers of the Observer”. How do I know that so many middle-class people have headed west to stand in a muddy field and torture themselves over whether not liking Young Fathers makes them sound racist? Because they’re obsessively tweeting about it, of course. “Talking albatrosses, bats, hedgehogs and badgers with RSPB at #Glastonbury,” chirruped Green leader Natalie Bennett on Friday . Not to be outdone, Nic Seton of Greenpeace posted an anchor tattoo with the caption: “Supporting sustainable fishing is fashionable ...
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Why the US recycling industry is feeling down in the dumps 27.6.2015 Guardian: Environment
Falling oil prices, a strong US dollar and a weakened Chinese economy are combining to make the global business of recycling less profitable than ever Tucked in the woods 50km north of Washington is a plant packed with energy-guzzling machines that can make even an environmentalist’s heart sing – giant conveyor belts, sorters and crushers saving a thousand tonnes of paper, plastic and other recyclables from reaching landfills each day. The 24-hour operation is a sign that after three decades of trying, a culture of kerbside recycling has become ingrained in cities and counties across the United States. Happy Valley, however, it is not. Once a profitable business for cities and private employers alike, recycling in recent years has become a money-sucking enterprise. The District of Columbia, Baltimore and many counties in between are contributing millions annually to prop up one of the nation’s busiest facilities here – but it is still losing money. In fact, almost every facility like it in the country is ...
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Finding beauty in the trash 26.6.2015 CNN: Top Stories
In Steven Duede's compost bin, beauty exists side by side with decay. Bright-pink roses with black-rimmed petals lay next to brown-splotched bananas and cracked eggshells.
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Gardening with Deb: Sl__ughs 24.6.2015 Steamboat Pilot
With the wet spring we've experienced this year, many gardeners are having problems with slugs...usually a rare occurrence in our dry, mountain environment. A type of mollusk related to oysters and clams, slugs are small soft-bodied gray or brown worm-like creatures...like snails without their shells. They glide along using a muscular foot that secretes a mucus to make movement easier. The dried mucus is the trail of slime that you see indicating the presence of this pest. A friend of mine asked how in the world they came to be in her garden this year when they had never been there before. Chances are they were there before, just never in such numbers because conditions in our generally warm, dry climate are not ideal for slugs. And since they come out at night, she probably never saw them or thought it was earwigs or other pests chewing on her foliage. An adult slug can lay on average 80 eggs into a hole in the soil, sometimes up to six times a year. During our cold weather, they either hibernate in the ...
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Blue bins are reason why American recycling is stalling 21.6.2015 Chicago Tribune: Nation
Tucked in the woods 30 miles north of Washington is a plant packed with energy-guzzling machines that can make even an environmentalist's heart sing - giant conveyor belts, sorters and crushers saving a thousand tons of paper, plastic and other recyclables from reaching landfills each ...
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American recycling is stalling, and the big blue bin is one reason why 21.6.2015 Washington Post
Tucked in the woods 30 miles north of Washington is a plant packed with energy-guzzling machines that can make even an environmentalist’s heart sing — giant conveyor belts, sorters and crushers saving a thousand tons of paper, plastic and other recyclables from reaching landfills each day.Read full article ...
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Local Briefs 19.6.2015 Durango Herald
Swim meet will close the rec center poolThe lap pool at the Durango Community Recreation Center will close to the public at 6 p.m. Friday and remain closed until 5:30 a.m. Monday for the Durango Swim Team Summer Invitational.The leisure pool, spa and splash pad will remain open during the weekend.For more information,...
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Glastonbury 2015: your tips on how to survive the world's greatest music festival 18.6.2015 The Guardian -- Front Page

Where to camp, what to eat, where to go to the toilet … Guardian readers offer their tips for making the most of your Glastonbury experience

Never camp at the bottom of a hill
Camping on a hill behind the family fields means you’ll get the least amount of traffic and the cleanest and least-busy toilets. Arrive as early as possible on Wednesday to pick the best camping spot – it gets very busy after that. Have a rough idea which acts and stages you are most likely to spend time on and set up camp in a good proximity from those. And never, ever camp at a bottom of a hill or near a main stage. Redhead7711

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Ethical eats – zero waste cafes and community projects 13.6.2015 Guardian: Environment
Ahead of two Guardian Local events about food and sustainability next month, we’d like to find out what’s going on in your area Two Guardian Local events next month will be focus on food and sustainability. Silo is a zero waste restaurant in Brighton that trades directly with farmers, produces its own butter, beer and flour and uses an onsite compost machine for scraps. While Corin Bell will be talking to members about her new pop up restaurant in Manchester that will use food that would otherwise be thrown away. We’ve heard of cafes where you can buy coffee for a homeless person, restaurants where you can pay for your meal by washing up. Now we’d like to find out what’s going on near ...
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Eco-friendly budget travel - latest guide 11.6.2015 Guardian: Environment

Forget cheap flights – from carsharing to couchsurfing, microadventures to Wwoofing, there’s plenty of ways to have a low-carbon, low-cost adventure

Budget flights continue to dominate the way we travel but there has been a growing interest in alternative overland transport. Carsharing on long-distance journeys (rather than just hitching a ride to Glastonbury) has seen a spike in popularity thanks to sites such as BlaBlaCar.

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Q&A: What’s the secret to a successful crop of bush beans? 11.6.2015 Seattle Times: Top stories
Bush beans are an easy garden crop to grow if you avoid a few missteps. They’re also tasty and nutritious, and worth whatever effort is required.
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You're Wasting More Food Than You Think 11.6.2015 Mother Jones
America wastes insane amounts of food. Pretty much everyone knows that. It turns out, however, that hardly anyone thinks they're among those who trash perfectly edible food. In a new study from the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future (CLF) published this morning in the journal PLOS ONE , researchers surveyed 1,010 nationally representative Americans to better understand the public's perception of food waste, and discovered that three-quarters of them believe they waste less food than the national average. Despite the fact that as much as 40 percent of American food goes uneaten—primarily from homes, stores, and restaurants, and at a cost of more than $160 billion a year—"Americans perceive themselves as wasting little," said study leader and director of the Food System Sustainability & Public Health Program at CLF, Roni Neff in a statement. "But in reality, we are wasting substantial quantities." The average American family wastes between $1,365 to $2,275 worth of food and beverages annually. We ...
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Are pot plants more eco friendly than cut flowers? 7.6.2015 Guardian: Environment
The global cut-flower industry is a behemoth to be reckoned with – but it’s not straightforward with pot plants either When your dedication to cut flowers rivals Elton John’s, the eco dilemmas come thick and fast. The global horticultural industry is huge. At the Aalsmeer flower auction in Holland, 20m stems change hands every day. In the week before Valentine’s Day 200m red roses will pass through this behemoth (yes, we really are that predictable). Most of your flowers will travel via this place. But their origins will be much farther flung. The main exporters are Kenya, Ethiopia and Colombia. Given that many producing countries with the right climatic conditions to grow at this scale are also water-scarce and low-wage economies, there are myriad ethical issues. So look for certification – the Fairtrade logo is on a number of flowers – or there’s Florverde , an eco-certification programme for flowers from Colombia. Check baseline standards and suppliers at ethicaltrade.org ...
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Schools ditch plastic lunch trays in favor of compostable plates 6.6.2015 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
The new plates are made of recycled newsprint and can break down within a matter of weeks in commercial composting facilities.
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Schools Say Ciao To Plastic Lunch Trays, Hello To Compostable Plates 6.6.2015 NPR Health Science
Six of the nation's largest school districts are ditching polystyrene lunch trays in favor of compostable plates. The hope is that they'll incentivize cities to build more composting facilities.
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Compost machines to tackle bio-degradable waste in Delhi 5.6.2015 New Kerala: World News
Read Full story of ' Compost machines to tackle bio-degradable waste in Delhi ' at newkerala.com.
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Pets and Gardens - Sow, Grow, Repeat Podcast 4.6.2015 The Guardian -- Front Page
Do pets and gardens mix? Alys Fowler and Jane Perrone investigate how to keep your garden and your pets happy Continue reading...
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How to get rid of millions of dead birds 2.6.2015 Minnesota Public Radio: Science
What happens once the bird flu is detected on a farm? How are the birds destroyed and disposed of? And just how bad does it smell?
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Washington farmers are dumping unprofitable apples 29.5.2015 AP Washington
SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) -- A record crop of apples, coupled with the West Coast port slowdown earlier this year, is taking a toll on Washington apple growers....
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