User: irge304 Topic: Environmental Justice Issues
Category: Land Conflicts
Last updated: Nov 22 2018 09:54 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Can 'voluntary colonialism' stop migration from Africa to Europe? 22.11.2018 BBC: World
African states should allow EU to build and run cities in their countries, a German minister tells the BBC.
Longmont City Council to consider open space master plan update 6.7.2018 Headlines: All Headlines
Longmont's City Council on Tuesday night is to review a proposed update of the 16-year-old master plan that guides the city's acquisition, preservation, improvement, maintenance and management of open space.
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Sharing the Tech Wealth 14.5.2018 American Prospect
This article appears in the Spring 2018 issue of The American Prospect magazine. Subscribe here .  When the Democratic “blue wall” stretching from Wisconsin through Michigan and Ohio to Pennsylvania fell on November 7, 2016, its breach reflected a growing socioeconomic gulf between the prosperous coastal states and depressed non-metro America. The vast majority of economic growth since 2008 has flowed to the coasts, while the Midwest and rural America have seen spikes in deaths of despair, divorce, an opiate crisis, and a moribund economy. It wasn’t always like this. Once upon a time, from roughly 1880 to 1980—an era Trump’s white supporters may have in mind when they demand America be Made Great Again—incomes of different regions more nearly converged. Much of U.S. manufacturing and its supply chain was based in the Midwest. Thanks to unionization, a good deal of basic industry paid decent wages. Meanwhile, other industries such as textiles and apparel migrated from New England to the Southeast, raising ...
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Sharing the Tech Wealth 14.5.2018 American Prospect
This article appears in the Spring 2018 issue of The American Prospect magazine. Subscribe here .  When the Democratic “blue wall” stretching from Wisconsin through Michigan and Ohio to Pennsylvania fell on November 7, 2016, its breach reflected a growing socioeconomic gulf between the prosperous coastal states and depressed non-metro America. The vast majority of economic growth since 2008 has flowed to the coasts, while the Midwest and rural America have seen spikes in deaths of despair, divorce, an opiate crisis, and a moribund economy. It wasn’t always like this. Once upon a time, from roughly 1880 to 1980—an era Trump’s white supporters may have in mind when they demand America be Made Great Again—incomes of different regions more nearly converged. Much of U.S. manufacturing and its supply chain was based in the Midwest. Thanks to unionization, a good deal of basic industry paid decent wages. Meanwhile, other industries such as textiles and apparel migrated from New England to the Southeast, raising ...
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Tanzania’s Maasai evicted in favor of tourism, group says 11.5.2018 Washington Post: World
Tens of thousands of Tanzania’s ethnic Maasai people are homeless after the government burned their houses to keep the savannah open for tourism benefiting two foreign safari companies, a U.S.-based policy think tank charged Thursday.
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The Energy 202: Three senior Scott Pruitt aides resigned from the EPA this week 4.5.2018 Washington Post
The Energy 202: Three senior Scott Pruitt aides resigned from the EPA this week
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People pushed out as communities redevelop metro Denver mobile home parks 22.4.2018 Denver Post: News: Local
Petra Bennett knows she doesn't have much longer in the home she's been paying a mortgage on for the last 17 years.
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Hike in retail marijuana tax is part of Denver’s plan to turbo-charge its $15 million-a-year affordable housing fund 16.4.2018 Denver Post: Local
Denver marijuana buyers would help pay for an expansion of Denver's 10-year, $150 million affordable housing fund under a plan that includes city borrowing to amp up apartment production.
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Why America Needs More Social Housing 16.4.2018 American Prospect
This article appears in the Spring 2018 issue of The American Prospect magazine.  Subscribe here .  The quest to provide what has come to be called “affordable housing” in America is hobbled by one fundamental reality. Too much housing is in the market sector and too little is in a social sector permanently protected from rising prices. The result is that supply and demand relentlessly bids up market prices. Government is required to provide deeper and deeper subsidies to keep rents within the bounds of incomes, so fewer and fewer people get any kind of help. This is true whether the form of public subsidy is tax breaks, direct subsidies, vouchers, or deals with developers to set aside some percent of units as affordable. In most cities, the median rent far exceeds what median incomes can afford. In cities with hot housing markets, homeownership is even further beyond reach for those who do not already own homes, exacerbating competition for scarce apartments. The idea of having a permanent sector of ...
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Company Towns Are Still with Us 21.3.2018 American Prospect
On a May morning in 1920, a train pulled into town on the Kentucky–West Virginia border. Its passengers included a small army of armed private security guards, who had been dispatched to evict the families of striking workers at a nearby coal mine. Meeting them at the station were the local police chief—a Hatfield of the infamous Hatfield-McCoy feud—and several out-of-work miners with guns. The private dicks and the local militia produced competing court orders. The street erupted in gunfire. When the smoke cleared, ten men lay dead—including two striking miners, the town mayor, and seven of the hired guns. The striking miners had worked for the Stone Mountain Coal Company, in mines located outside the city limits of Matewan. There, they rented homes that were owned by their employer, shopped at a general store that was owned by their employer, and paid in a company-generated form of “cash” that could only be spent at that company store. When they joined a United Mine Workers organizing drive and struck ...
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The biggest solar parks in the world are now being built in India 19.3.2018 L.A. Times - World News

Weeds poke listlessly from the flat, rocky earth as the temperature climbs to the mid-90s. On a cloudless March afternoon, the blue horizon stretches out uninterrupted, as if even birds are too weary to fly.

On this unforgiving patch of southern India, millions of silver-gray panels glimmer in...

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Chicago, airlines nearing $8.5 billion deal to dramatically expand O'Hare 26.2.2018 Chicago Tribune: Business
Mayor Rahm Emanuel and Chicago’s airline carriers are in the final stages of negotiating an $8.5 billion blockbuster deal to dramatically expand O’Hare International Airport with a state-of-the-art global terminal, dozens of new gates and several additional concourses, the Chicago Tribune has ...
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Golden man behind slow-growth initiative argues limited residential building will boost Colorado economy 9.2.2018 Denver Post: Business
Higher wages, lower taxes, stable traffic, more wildlife conservation, better protection of water and other resources. From Daniel Hayes' perspective, the advantages to pumping the brakes on residential growth along the Front Range are just about endless.
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The Health 202: Here's one legal and political battle you didn't expect: Republicans versus health insurers 10.1.2018 Washington Post: Politics
It's over the ACA (that part is not a surprise)
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Couple donates $165 million to preserve 24,000 acres at Point Conception 22.12.2017 LA Times: Science

A conservation group on Thursday purchased a sprawling stretch of Santa Barbara County coastline — a prized acquisition made possible by a $165-million gift from a couple who had long sought to protect the pristine ranchland from development.

The nonprofit Nature Conservancy acquired the Cojo-Jalama...

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Local businessman Mark Ein to buy Washington City Paper for undisclosed sum 22.12.2017 Washington Post
Local businessman Mark Ein to buy Washington City Paper for undisclosed sum
With Fox purchase, Disney takes on tech titans in streaming wars 15.12.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Disney CEO Bob Iger’s audacious bid to buy much of the media empire Rupert Murdoch built represents a big bet that the Burbank company can beat Silicon Valley in the war for the future of entertainment.

The Walt Disney Co. on Thursday agreed to pay $52.4-billion to buy film and TV assets owned...

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Former GOCO chief named to lead national Outdoor Foundation 15.12.2017 Denver Post: Outdoors
Veteran conservationist Lise Aangeenbrug has been named executive director of the Outdoor Foundation, the philanthropic arm of the Outdoor Industry Association. She was selected from a field of more than 100 candidates.
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Rockefeller and the secret land deals that created Grand Tetons National Park 5.12.2017 Washington Post
Rockefeller and the secret land deals that created Grand Tetons National Park
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An uncertain energy future 4.12.2017 Opinion – The Indian Express
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