User: irge304 Topic: Environmental Justice Issues
Category: Environmental Justice
Last updated: Apr 25 2017 13:59 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 2,829    
Seafood processor, EPA settle on Alaska violations 25.4.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Anchorage, Alaska • A Seattle-based seafood processing company operating in Alaska will be assessed a $1.3 million civil penalty for violating clean air rules under a proposed settlement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the state of Alaska. Westward Seafoods, owned by Maruha Nichiro Corp. of Japan, also would be required to pay $1.1 million for air pollution reduction projects and more than $800,000 for improved training and monitoring of emissions. It’s the second civil penalty...
Also found in: [+]
Seafood processor, EPA settle on Alaska clean air violations 25.4.2017 AP Washington
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) -- A Seattle-based seafood processing company operating in Alaska will be assessed a $1.3 million civil penalty for violating clean air rules under a proposed settlement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the state of Alaska....
Also found in: [+]
North Carolina Republicans Are Trying to Keep Residents From Suing Hog Farms 22.4.2017 Mother Jones
Modern hog farms make pungent neighbors. In North Carolina's hog-wild Duplin county, an average-sized operation holds more than 7,000 pigs , each generating about 10 times the fecal waste of a person . This massive manure gusher falls through slats and is shunted into open cesspools, known, rather delicately, as "lagoons." When the pits reach capacity, the untreated fecal slurry is sprayed onto nearby farmland as fertilizer. A recent analysis of satellite data by Environmental Working Group found that around 160,000 North Carolinians, representing more than 60,000 households, live within a half mile of a CAFO or a manure pit. In Duplin County alone, more than 12,000 people—about a fifth of the county's population—live within sniffing distance of one of these fragrant facilities, EWG found. A growing body of research, summarized here , shows that these operations "pollute local ground and surface water," and "routinely emit air pollutants that negatively impact the quality of life and health of nearby ...
Also found in: [+]
Five myths about oceans 21.4.2017 Washington Post: Op-Eds
No, the deep sea isn’t a lightless abyss.
Also found in: [+]
Saving the Planet Goes Local 21.4.2017 American Prospect
This article appears in the Spring 2017 issue of The American Prospect magazine. Subscribe here .  Of all the Trump administration’s policies, the one most likely to cause damage that can’t be undone may not be deporting immigrants or throwing poor people off Medicaid or outsourcing our foreign policy to the Kremlin. Rather, it could well be a cessation of efforts to combat climate change. The accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere is cumulative; even a later reversal of the Trump administration’s fossil fuel–friendly policies would not be able to undo the damage about to be done. Even by the environmentally retrograde standards of his party, Donald Trump stands out as an extreme climate-science denier: Cold winter weather in New York prompts him to tweet that global warming has been proven a hoax. He hates wind farms (partly because they threaten the views from one of his Scottish golf resorts). On the campaign trail, Trump vowed to repeal President Obama’s pro-climate regulations and all ...
Also found in: [+]
Scott Pruitt's New Plan for the EPA Will Destroy Towns Like This One 19.4.2017 Mother Jones
The Environmental Protection Agency's administrator has found a slogan for his embattled agency's new direction. Last week, Scott Pruitt announced a #Back2Basics campaign that proposes returning the EPA to its supposed roots: protecting the environment, spurring job growth, and not burdening industry with rules and regulations. Pruitt might see firsthand the problems with this vision on Wednesday when he visits East Chicago, Indiana, a mostly black and Latino city of 29,000 that is home to a Superfund site and a host of other environmental problems. Local officials , including Indiana's Republican governor, Eric Holcomb, urged Pruitt to visit the site and address the issues surrounding the cleanup process, which has been lagging for several years. The site is known as USS Lead, referring to the smelting facility that operated there between 1906 and 1985, turning refined copper and lead into batteries and other products and, in the process, contaminating the soil in the area with lead and arsenic . The ...
Also found in: [+]
After bucking leadership on transportation bill, Bakersfield Democrat loses powerful Assembly committee post 18.4.2017 LA Times: Commentary
Also found in: [+]
That $52-billion road bill just made California's next climate change move a heavy lift 16.4.2017 LA Times: Commentary

It took late-night cajoling and nearly $1 billion in deal sweeteners for Gov. Jerry Brown and top Democrats to muscle through a $52-billion tax-and-fee plan just over a week ago to repair California’s roads.

Now they have to do it all again. Brown and legislative leaders have another daunting battle...

Also found in: [+]
Rev. Otis Moss on ways to build community 11.4.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Rev. Otis Moss III speaks about the best ways to support community advancement, civil rights, environmental justice and economic equality.
In Madrid, A Plan To Fight Pollution By Shifting Away From Diesel-Run Cars 6.4.2017 NPR News
Half of all cars in Europe run on diesel, compared to 3 percent in the U.S. But Madrid has vowed to ban diesel vehicles by 2025, to cut air pollution. Paris and Athens have made similar pledges.
Also found in: [+]
The Anti-Trump Movement: Recover, Resist, Reform 4.4.2017 American Prospect
This article appears in the Spring 2017 issue of The American Prospect. Subscribe here. Every day since Donald Trump’s January 20 inauguration, Hetty Rosenstein gets up at 6 a.m. to write an email to activists throughout New Jersey about upcoming rallies, marches, meetings, and other events to protest Trump’s agenda. The list began with 80 names, but by the end of February, the 62-year-old Rosenstein, state director of the Communications Workers of America union, was sending her daily email blasts to more than 2,700 people. Her missives include information on protests at town meetings sponsored by Republican Congress members, weekly vigils to defend the Affordable Care Act, training sessions of burgeoning activists, rallies for immigrant rights and transgender students, a talk and rally at a Trenton church by activist Reverend William Barber II, reminders of upcoming marches like the International Women’s Day strike (“Wear red in solidarity”), and an “Evict Trump-Kushner” rally at a Jersey City office ...
Also found in: [+]
APNewsBreak: Losses from mine spill may be less than feared 3.4.2017 Seattle Times: Business & Technology

DENVER (AP) — Economic damage from a Colorado mine waste spill caused by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency may be far less than originally feared after attorneys drastically reduced some of the larger claims, The Associated Press has learned. Farmers, business owners, residents and others initially said they suffered a staggering $1.2 billion in lost […]
Also found in: [+]
Colorado governor: State will push forward with clean energy 30.3.2017 Denver Post: All Political News
Colorado will push ahead to develop more affordable renewable energy despite President Donald Trump's order eliminating many restrictions on fossil fuels production, Gov. John Hickenlooper said Wednesday.
Also found in: [+]
Today: Trump Won’t Fight Climate Change? California, Here We Come 29.3.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Can California help lead a coalition of states and countries to fight climate change? I'm Davan Maharaj, editor-in-chief of the Los Angeles Times. Here are some story lines I don't want you to miss today.

TOP STORIES

Trump Won’t Fight Climate Change? California, Here We Come

California, New York,...

Also found in: [+]
The World in Pictures 28.3.2017 Lifestyle – The Indian Express
Also found in: [+]
Researchers test hotter, faster and cleaner way to fight oil spills 22.3.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
The Flame Refluxer is essentially a big copper blanket: think Brillo pad of wool sandwiched between mesh. Using it while burning off oil yields less air pollution and residue that harms marine life.
Also found in: [+]
Court gives 2 Indian rivers same rights as a human 21.3.2017 Washington Post: World
A court in northern India has granted the same legal rights as a human to the Ganges and Yamuna rivers, considered sacred by nearly a billion Indians.
Also found in: [+]
Indian court gives Ganges, Yamuna same rights as a human 21.3.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

NEW DELHI (AP) — A court in the northern Indian state of Uttarakhand has granted the same legal rights as a human to the Ganges and Yamuna rivers, considered sacred by nearly a billion Indians. The Uttarakhand High Court ruled Monday that the two rivers be accorded the status of living human entities, meaning that […]
Also found in: [+]
Cheerleaders, chambermaids: The Supreme Court’s broad reach 20.3.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

WASHINGTON (AP) — The rhythms of daily life for ordinary Americans may seem far removed from the rarified world of the U.S. Supreme Court. But from the time people roll out of bed in the morning until they turn in at night, the court’s rulings are woven into their lives in ways large and small. […]
Also found in: [+]
State leaders fill three vacant California Coastal Commission seats 17.3.2017 LA Times: Commentary

The state’s top elected officials on Thursday completed their selections to fill three vacant positions on the California Coastal Commission — the powerful land use agency that has been buffeted by controversy, including the firing of its executive director last year.

Gov. Jerry Brown made the...

Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 2,829