User: irge304 Topic: Environmental Justice Issues
Category: Environmental Justice
Last updated: Mar 26 2017 08:17 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Researchers test hotter, faster and cleaner way to fight oil spills 22.3.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
The Flame Refluxer is essentially a big copper blanket: think Brillo pad of wool sandwiched between mesh. Using it while burning off oil yields less air pollution and residue that harms marine life.
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Court gives 2 Indian rivers same rights as a human 21.3.2017 Washington Post: World
A court in northern India has granted the same legal rights as a human to the Ganges and Yamuna rivers, considered sacred by nearly a billion Indians.
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Indian court gives Ganges, Yamuna same rights as a human 21.3.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

NEW DELHI (AP) — A court in the northern Indian state of Uttarakhand has granted the same legal rights as a human to the Ganges and Yamuna rivers, considered sacred by nearly a billion Indians. The Uttarakhand High Court ruled Monday that the two rivers be accorded the status of living human entities, meaning that […]
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Cheerleaders, chambermaids: The Supreme Court’s broad reach 20.3.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

WASHINGTON (AP) — The rhythms of daily life for ordinary Americans may seem far removed from the rarified world of the U.S. Supreme Court. But from the time people roll out of bed in the morning until they turn in at night, the court’s rulings are woven into their lives in ways large and small. […]
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State leaders fill three vacant California Coastal Commission seats 17.3.2017 LA Times: Commentary

The state’s top elected officials on Thursday completed their selections to fill three vacant positions on the California Coastal Commission — the powerful land use agency that has been buffeted by controversy, including the firing of its executive director last year.

Gov. Jerry Brown made the...

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See the stars at Cedar Breaks, Utah's newest dark-sky park 16.3.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
From the rim of Cedar Breaks National Monument on clear, moon-less nights, around 5,000 stars can be seen above this deep-red geological amphitheater. On a recent tour, Dave Sorensen, one of the park’s “dark rangers,” described how the forces of erosion have hollowed out the iron-rich sediments left by Lake Claron. “Since the lake has been gone this area we know as Cedar Breaks has been eroding out for the last 20 million years. It erodes at a rate of 1 to 4 feet a century. To a geologist, that...
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This Lead-Poisoned City Could Be Trump's Flint, Michigan 15.3.2017 Mother Jones
In East Chicago, Indiana, where 90 percent of this population of 29,000 are people of color and one-third live below the poverty line, a lead crisis is unfolding and residents are concerned that the Environmental Protection Agency under Scott Pruitt is unlikely to respond. For decades , industrial plants polluted the air and soil with lead and arsenic in East Chicago neighborhoods that included a public housing complex and an elementary school. In 2014, the EPA declared the lead plant in the area a Superfund site and began the cleanup, but a Reuters investigation in 2016 found that children living near the Superfund site still had elevated levels of lead in their blood. The EPA subsequently tested the water and found that not only did the homes in the vicinity have elevated levels of lead in their drinking water, but so did the entire city—much as Flint did during its 2014 water crisis. The EPA estimated that up to 90 percent of East Chicago homes received water through lead service lines. In December ...
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EPA's Chief Environmental Justice Official Steps Down 13.3.2017 NPR: Morning Edition
One of the EPA programs the new administration hopes to eliminate this year — according to a budget proposal seen by "The Washington Post" — is the office of Environmental Justice. Steve Inskeep talks to Mustafa Ali, who helped found the office in 1992.
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In the battle over California climate policies, green projects are now in the hot seat 13.3.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Outdated refrigerators arrive at a Compton warehouse in a funeral procession of defunct appliances. Workers vacuum out the coolants and ship the chemicals halfway across the country, where they’re destroyed instead of allowed to escape into the atmosphere, worsening global warming.

The operation...

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EPA's Environmental Justice Head Resigned After 24 Years. He Wants to Explain Why. 10.3.2017 Mother Jones
The head of the Environmental Protection Agency's Office on Environmental Justice submitted his resignation on Tuesday. First reported by InsideClimate News , the resignation of Mustafa Ali comes as the Trump administration considers layoffs and budget cuts at the EPA that, if enacted, would eliminate the environmental justice budget and cut funding to grants for pollution cleanup. Ali, a founder of the program in 1992 who has worked there since, told Mother Jones he resigned because he was concerned the administration's proposals to roll back its environmental justice work would disproportionately affect vulnerable communities. "That is something that I could not be a part of," Ali says. "Each new administration has an opportunity to share what their priorities and values are," he says, adding that he has "not heard of anything that was being proposed that was beneficial to the communities we serve. To me that was a signal that communities with environmental justice concern may not get the attention ...
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Keystone XL opponents appeal South Dakota authorization 9.3.2017 Seattle Times: Business & Technology

PIERRE, S.D. (AP) — Opponents of the Keystone XL oil pipeline have asked a judge in Pierre, South Dakota, to reverse a decision by state regulators to authorize the portion of the project that would traverse the state. Here’s a look at the proceedings: THE PIPELINE The $8 billion Keystone XL project would move crude […]
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Los Angeles keeps building near freeways, even though living there makes people sick 9.3.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

Air-quality officials have long warned about the health hazards of building homes near freeways, but elected officials and business groups argue that Los Angeles is so thoroughly crisscrossed by the roads that restricting growth near them is impractical.
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Hush hush 6.3.2017 BBC: Business
The new design of London black taxi cab has an electric engine that makes it virtually silent.
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Why are black cabs being tested in the Arctic Circle? 6.3.2017 BBC: Business
The brand new design for London's iconic vehicle is tested out in an extreme and clean environment.
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The Daily 202: Wiretapping allegations accomplished what Trump wanted – but may backfire bigly 6.3.2017 Washington Post: Politics
Six ways they could boomerang on the president
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Common ground on climate change? Some in GOP say yes 3.3.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Business
Republicans need to accept the effects of regulations on the economy and Democrats must be pragmatic about working with businesses toward solutions, three GOP analysts said in a discussion airing recently on MPR News.
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UN official: Tribe not properly heard in pipeline dispute 3.3.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — A United Nations official who visited North Dakota in the wake of months of protests over the disputed Dakota Access oil pipeline believes the concerns and rights of Native Americans haven’t been adequately addressed. North Dakota Republican Gov. Doug Burgum says the state has respected legal protests and that it focused […]
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New study reveals air pollution can alter effectiveness of antibiotics 3.3.2017 New Kerala: World News
New study reveals air pollution can alter effectiveness of antibiotics
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Air pollution alters effectiveness of antibiotics 3.3.2017 New Kerala: World News
Air pollution alters effectiveness of antibiotics
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L.A. keeps building near freeways, even though living there makes people sick 2.3.2017 LA Times: Commentary

For more than a decade, California air quality officials have warned against building homes within 500 feet of freeways.

And with good reason: People there suffer higher rates of asthma, heart attacks, strokes, lung cancer and pre-term births. Recent research has added more health risks to the...

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