User: irge304 Topic: Environmental Justice Issues
Category: Environmental Justice
Last updated: Jul 24 2014 20:23 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 2,186    
The Dark Snow team investigates the source of soot that's accelerating Greenland ice melt 24.7.2014 Guardian: Environment

The crowd-funded Dark Snow Project is trying to figure out where Greenland soot is coming from

Continue reading...
Also found in: [+]
Eat this fish, save the world 22.7.2014 CNN: Top Stories
In the wake of the important decision by the Environmental Protection Agency to block mining in Alaska's Bristol Bay in order to protect the wild salmon population there, it's a good moment to take stock of the many dangers facing our world's waterways -- and our world's fish. It turns out the wild salmon of Bristol Bay are one of the five least toxic fish to eat around the globe and thankfully will stay that way, thanks to the Obama administration. But what are the other four? And why are the world's fish and water under such threat?
Also found in: [+]
The wealth gap is growing, but poor women see one improvement: healthier newborns 21.7.2014 Washington Post

BRIDGEPORT, Conn. — As a kid who grew up in violence-racked public housing here, Wanda Verret had no idea what to do when she got pregnant at age 14. She didn’t go to the doctor until her sixth month of pregnancy, smoked cigarettes and dropped out of school. “I was a baby having a baby,” she said.

Read full article >>
Also found in: [+]
FBI warns about unapproved air-conditioner coolant 20.7.2014 Seattle Times: Nation & World
The FBI is warning people to be on alert for refrigerant substitutes that have not been approved by the Environmental Protection Agency. Some contain propane, which is flammable and can explode or catch fire.
Also found in: [+]
FBI issues warning about unapproved air conditioner coolant that could explode or catch fire 19.7.2014 Star Tribune: Business
Also found in: [+]
FBI issues warning about air conditioner coolant 19.7.2014 Star Tribune: Latest
As the U.S. tries to phase out a polluting refrigerant that is used in millions of air conditioners across the country, unapproved coolant is popping up on the market — with potentially dangerous consequences.
Also found in: [+]
Pollution-plagued Manila set to spark an electric transport revolution 17.7.2014 The Guardian -- Front Page
Philippine capital road-tests ambitious and sustainable scheme to ease traffic congestion and pollution problems

Every morning, millions of commuters battle it out on Manila's roads and railways. The city of 12 million swells to 15 million during week days, forcing traffic speeds down to 5km per hour. During the rush hour, a 30-minute journey can take up to three hours.

In 2012, the Philippine capital's economy lost about 2.4bn pesos a day (£32m) as a result of its traffic jams. At this rate, the country stands to lose up to P6bn a day by 2030, according to the Japanese International Corporation Agency (Jica), which has been trying to reduce this mammoth infrastructure problem.

Continue reading...
Also found in: [+]
Mining poses new threat to world's greatest rhino sanctuary 17.7.2014 The Guardian -- Front Page

Plans for an opencast coalmine on the boundary of South Africa's Hluhluwe-Imfolozi reserve could pave the way for even greater poaching and pollution

The surface of a pool near the Imfolozi river ripples as a white rhino, its young calf close by, lowers its mouth to drink. Rhinos have roamed the Earth in such a way for 40 million years. Humans, by comparison, are new kids on the block.

Yet it is modern man that threatens to drive these stately creatures to extinction. Figures released last week show that 558 rhinos have been slaughtered in South Africa so far in 2014, putting it on course to be the deadliest year of poaching since records began.

Continue reading...
Also found in: [+]
Plastic, poverty and pollution in China's recycling dead zone 16.7.2014 The Guardian -- Front Page
In 2010 Adam Minter visited Wen'an, once at the heart of the global scrap plastic trade. In this never-before published extract from his book he describes the effects on workers' health In 2010, Adam Minter, Bloomberg's Shanghai correspondent, visited Wen'an - then the heart of the global scrap plastic trade undercover. In 2011 the Chinese government introduced new regulations and shut down the scrap plastic trade in this part of the country. The small family businesses closed or scattered across the country. In 2013, according to figures from the Bureau of International Recycling, China imported about 8-9m tonnes of plastics scrap - less than in previous years. BIR estimates that global plastic scrap consumption will climb from 15m tonnes in 2007 to around 45m tonnes by 2015. Here is an extract from Minter's book about his experience. Its a bustling, crowded and incomprehensibly dirty main street, crossed by the occasional stray dog, partly blocked by a broken-down truck, and frequently scarred by ...
Also found in: [+]
There are aliens among us 15.7.2014 Guardian: Environment
The dragonfly nymph's extendable mouth parts, housed behind serrated jaws, are the stuff of a science-fiction nightmare Continue reading...
Also found in: [+]
Filets aren't the issue in Inslee's remarkable fish-consumption decision 14.7.2014 Seattle Times: Opinion
How much fish do you eat? Twelve pounds a month? If you’re like most people, the answer isn’t anywhere close – one of the reasons Gov. Jay Inslee’s judgment call on a momentous water-quality issue last week struck so many people as absurd.
Also found in: [+]
Denver's renovated Union Station has been a 30-year barn-raising 13.7.2014 Headlines: All Headlines
At 6:30 a.m. on Dec. 4, 2012, three Denver real estate developers sat down for a hastily arranged breakfast at the Egg Shell in Cherry Creek. On the menu was an order for $6 million.
Also found in: [+]
Is a British car really British? 13.7.2014 Guardian: Environment
Im keen to buy a new car thats made in Britain, and there are many on the market. But are they really made here or just assembled from parts shipped from wherever?
If you have an ethical dilemma, email Lucy at lucy.siegle@observer.co.uk Continue reading...
Boris Johnson's indifference to pollution is killing us | Ken Livingstone 11.7.2014 Guardian: Comment is Free
Thousands of people in London are dying prematurely every year. Hiring young women to hand leaflets to drivers is not enough The news that Oxford Street is the world's most polluted place comes as no surprise to those people who work in or visit central London. What will surprise them, however, is the scale of death caused by London's air quality. Back in 2000 when I became mayor, the government's medical advisers estimated that each year 1,200 Londoners would die prematurely by an average of eight months. The main cause was the nitrous gases (NOx) and particulate matter (PM10s) which pass directly into the blood stream, triggering heart attacks, strokes and ...
Also found in: [+]
Vernon battery recycler is allowed to reopen, with conditions 11.7.2014 LA Times: Environment
Air quality officials are giving a battery recycling plant in Vernon another chance to prove it can operate without putting nearby residents at risk.
Also found in: [+]
Does London have the worst NO2 pollution on Earth? 10.7.2014 The Guardian -- Front Page
Academics claimed this week that Oxford Street has the worst nitrogen dioxide pollution in the world. Today the European Court of Justice is hearing evidence in a case against UK's consistent breaches of EU air standards.With your help, Karl Mathiesen investigates how bad things are. Let us know your thoughts. Post in the comments below, email karl.mathiesen.freelance@theguardian.com or tweet @karlmathiesen 11.49am BST For those of you unable to slip beyond the Times' paywall, the story on Sunday was based on figures released at a conference by researchers at King's College Environmental Research Group . I have contacted King's for further comment and access to their statistics. Dr Benjamin Barratt, from the group, told the Times that buses and cabs have moved to diesel in order to reduce levels of particulate pollution caused primarily by petrol engines. Oxford Street is full of buses and black cabs, all diesel-powered. It is a quirk of modern diesels that they produce more NO2 than in the past. This is ...
Also found in: [+]
Price of electricity could double over next 20 years, says National Grid 10.7.2014 Guardian: Environment
Pipes and pylons operator says failure to invest more in local gas production would leave country 90% dependent on imports
Continue reading...
Also found in: [+]
Welcome to London the most toxic town on the planet 8.7.2014 The Guardian -- Front Page
Oxford Street's more polluted than Beijing and the sky's alive with cranes. Just what kind of city is Boris Johnson creating? Emissions research from King's College London has found nitrogen dioxide concentrations on Oxford Street to be worse than they are anywhere else on Earth , in the history of air pollution. David Carslaw, who led the research, said: "To my knowledge this is the highest in the world in terms of both hourly and annual mean." That's higher than Beijing and Dhaka, higher than anywhere where face masks are the norm and the streets seem to throng with lost medics, and more than 11 times the EU limit. A spokesman for the mayor of London called the figures "misleading", and said that the capital's air pollution was lower than that in many world cities. The fact is, there is too much stop-start traffic, too many tall buildings, too much nitrogen dioxide. But if you were more interested in winning a debate than you are in the air your fellow Londoners were breathing, you could see this as ...
Also found in: [+]
In the Twin Cities, asthma most prevalent along I-94: Here's why 8.7.2014 Minnesota Public Radio: Science
An estimated 90,000 Minnesota children have asthma, and a disproportionate number of them are African-American and American Indian. Counting adults, the number of asthma cases in the state jumps to more than 400,000. Where people live can explain much of the racial disparity in asthma rates.
Also found in: [+]
Dark Snow Is Accelerating Glacier Melting From the Arctic to the Himalayas 8.7.2014 Mother Jones
This story originally appeared in the Guardian and is republished here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. When American geologist Ulyana Horodyskyj set up a mini weather station at 5,800 meters on Mount Himlung, on the Nepal-Tibet border, she looked east toward Everest and was shocked. The world's highest glacier, Khumbu, was turning visibly darker as particles of fine dust, blown by fierce winds, settled on the bright, fresh snow. "One-week-old snow was turning black and brown before my eyes," she said. The problem was even worse on the nearby Ngozumpa glacier, which snakes down from Cho Oyu—the world's sixth-highest mountain. There, Horodyskyj found that so much dust had been blown on to the surface that the ability of the ice to reflect sunlight, a process known as albedo, dropped 20 percent in a single month. The dust that was darkening the brilliant whiteness of the snow was heating up in the strong sun and melting the snow and ice, she said. The phenomenon of "dark snow" is being recorded ...
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 2,186