User: irge304 Topic: Energy Extraction
Category: Coal Mining
Last updated: Dec 19 2014 19:50 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 7,232    
Utopia shrinking 19.12.2014 CNN: Top Stories
When he brought his camera to shoot the shrinking German city of Hoyerswerda, you could say American photographer Demetrius Freeman took a few risks.
Also found in: [+]
The Great Budget Sellout of 2014: Do We Even Have a Second Party? 16.12.2014 American Prospect
  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) For in the great budget sellout of December 2014, fully 57 House Democrats voted with the Republicans to narrowly pass this deal. Key Senate Democrats close to Wall Street, such as Chuck Schumer of New York, shown here, were its enablers. This article originally appeared at The Huffington Post . In principle, Saturday's vote to keep the government open should be the perfect curtain-raiser for the political debates between now and the 2016 election. As their price for averting a government shutdown, Republicans demanded and got a gutting of one of the most important provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act, preventing banks from speculating with government insured money. Agencies hated by Republicans such as the Environmental Protection Agency took big cuts, and a rider was inserted permitting "mountaintop removal" coal mining once again. Another extraneous provision demanded by conservatives permits massive increase in individual campaign contributions. The IRS enforcement budget ...
Also found in: [+]
The story never ends: Mike Yurich’s significant moments in South Routt history 14.12.2014 Steamboat Pilot
Calvary comes to town In 1914, the now-ghost town of Ludlow was undergoing a massive strike among its miners, one that culminated in an attack of more than a thousand workers. It’s now known as the Ludlow Massacre. At the same time, South Routt coal miners were striking for the same reasons, calling for better working conditions while trying to form a union against stubborn mine owners. A cavalry unit was called into town to “keep the peace” and restore order, Yurich said. “They came into Oak Creek on 100 horses and they built it up where the schoolhouse is,” Yurich said. “That was an interesting time period when they came in.” The Ku Klux Klan presence in town A changeover in town government brought on the rise of Klan members in Routt County and Oak Creek in the 1920s. An area exceptionally diverse with mine and railroad workers immigrating to town from all over the world, Yurich explained that the Klan members weren’t exactly how they are primarily known today. “The Klan really wasn’t against ...
Also found in: [+]
The story never ends 14.12.2014 Steamboat Pilot
Oak Creek's Mike Yurich sits on a rickety wooden stool in a cramped room no bigger than the size of a walk-in closet. He's quiet, taking a brief moment to ponder his surroundings. Stacked around the 80-year-old man are dozens of binders, and inside those binders are hundreds of carefully typed pages. The binders, many labeled with the names of longtime families, contain Yurich's vast collection of the tiny town's history — much of it unknown or untold. And inside this tiny room in the middle of Tracks & Trails Museum on Main Street is where Yurich has devoted hundreds of hours to his life’s work of chronicling the history of Oak Creek. It’s the place where Yurich feels at home. His home away from home Yurich was born in 1934 in Oak Creek, a town rich in mining, ranching and railroad history. As a young boy, Yurich remembers Main Street — the roughly mile-long stretch of road that takes just seconds to pass through when traveling Colorado Highway 131 — as being lined by homes. Yurich said the houses ...
Also found in: [+]
Deep in coal country, pondering future without it 14.12.2014 Seattle Times: Top stories
State and federal initiatives are exploring everything from ecotourism and small farmer loans to regional tax incentives for job creators. Others are still praying for a regulatory climate change that will breathe new life into the region’s mines.
Also found in: [+]
Deep in coal country, pondering future without it 12.12.2014 Seattle Times: Business & Technology
State and federal initiatives are exploring everything from ecotourism and small farmer loans to regional tax incentives for job creators. Others are still praying for a regulatory climate change that will breathe new life into the region’s mines.
Also found in: [+]
Democrats balk at spending bill as government shutdown looms 11.12.2014 Chicago Tribune: Popular
Congressional Democrats objected on Wednesday to controversial financial and political campaign provisions tucked into a $1.1 trillion U.S. spending bill, keeping the risk of a government shutdown ...
Also found in: [+]
Democrats balk at spending bill, raising shutdown risk 11.12.2014 Chicago Tribune: Nation
Congressional Democrats objected on Wednesday to controversial financial and political campaign provisions tucked into a $1.1 trillion U.S. spending bill, keeping the risk of a government shutdown ...
Also found in: [+]
Keystone XL and Galilee basin threaten to bring down the global climate talks 11.12.2014 Guardian: Environment

If fine words at the Lima climate summit mean anything, the US-Canada tar sands pipeline and a series of Australian coal mines must be shelved

Continue reading...
Also found in: [+]
Black Mesa mines: Native Americans demand return of their ancestors' bones 10.12.2014 Guardian: Environment
Navajo and Hopi Nations are fighting for the protection of Arizona burial grounds as one of the world’s largest coal companies seeks extension of its mining permit In 1967 the Peabody coal company came to the Navajo and Hopi reservations in northern Arizona and Utah to excavate a strip mine – but the land it leased from the tribes was on an ancient tribal burial ground. So, as required by law, it hired archeologists and for the next 17 years a dig known as the Black Mesa archeological project – the largest in North American history – unearthed more than one million artefacts, including the remains of 200 Native Americans. Now the bones and artefacts are at the centre of a debate between tribes people who say ancestral remains and archeological ruins have been desecrated, and a coal company and government officials who are planning a new ...
Also found in: [+]
25 of Most Interesting Photos of Earth From Space This Year 10.12.2014 Wired Top Stories
There are a lot of satellites surrounding our planet, observing and imaging its surface. But some of the sharpest, most capable among them belong to Digital Globe. Now, the company has released 25 of their best shots of 2014 for you to judge. Digital Globe’s new flagship satellite, WorldView-3 was launched earlier this year with ...
Also found in: [+]
Polish waste-processing firm rejects toxic shipment from El Salvador 9.12.2014 L.A. Times - World News
A waste incineration plant in southern Poland has rejected a shipment of pesticide-tainted soil and runoff from El Salvador after residents staged protests over the impending delivery of waste linked to kidney disease.
Also found in: [+]
Poland rejects toxic waste shipped from El Salvador due to be destroyed in southern town 8.12.2014 Star Tribune: World
Also found in: [+]
In Ukraine, citizens feeling war's toll on economy 8.12.2014 L.A. Times - World News
Galina Artemyuk doesn't bother with gloves even though the mercury never rises above freezing this time of year and her wind-chapped hands are as red as boiled lobsters.
Also found in: [+]
Gods and faith versus Coal in name of climate change 6.12.2014 Guardian: Environment

Religious leaders in Australia are taking on coal with polite letters and coal blockades and say they’re in it for the long haul in the name of climate change

Continue reading...
Also found in: [+]
Navajo energy company names new, contentious CEO 2.12.2014 Durango Herald
FARMINGTON – An energy company owned by the Navajo Nation has named an executive whose last project sparked conflict with Oregon tribes as its new CEO.The Daily Times of Farmington reported that Clark A. Moseley has been chosen as CEO of Navajo Transitional Energy Co. after a nationwide search.The company said in a news...
Also found in: [+]
Clean Power Plan carbon emission comments due Monday 1.12.2014 Steamboat Pilot
Monday is the deadline to submit comments to the Environmental Protection Agency concerning the proposed Clean Energy Plan that aims to reduce carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants. The next step is for the federal government to review submitted statements made during the past several months in order to make a final rule on the plan by June. Originally, the deadline was Oct. 15, but it was extended to Dec. 1 after the EPA received nearly 750,000 comments before the first deadline, according to the EPA. Northwest Colorado houses two coal-fired power plants, Craig Station in Moffat County and Hayden Station in Routt County. Moffat County has two surface coal mines, Colowyo and Trapper Mine, that feed coal to Craig Station. Twentymile is a below-ground coal mine in Routt County that mines coal for Hayden Station. Both counties have expressed concerns that if the Clean Power Plan is too stringent, it could hurt the Yampa Valley economy. In June, President Barack Obama released the proposed plan to ...
Also found in: [+]
Former Wallabies captain David Pocock chained to digger in Maules Creek protest 30.11.2014 Guardian: Environment

Rugby star says he has joined the long-running anti-coalmine campaign in NSW because ‘it is part of being a human being’

Continue reading...
Also found in: [+]
Kentucky’s answer to fiscal worries: bourbon, straight up 30.11.2014 Seattle Times: Nation & World
While Kentucky has enjoyed a special upswing from bourbon, across the country, changing consumer tastes and changes to state regulatory and tax policies have created a bull market in booze-related businesses.
Also found in: [+]
In Appalachia, beekeepers using mountains once scraped up or blown apart for coal 29.11.2014 Star Tribune: Business
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 7,232