User: irge304 Topic: Biodiversity
Category: Protection :: Conservation Efforts
Last updated: Jul 28 2014 07:30 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 10,676    
Zoos face a cold, hard truth: The future is in the freezer 28.7.2014 Washington Post

She’s not just another girl with a pretty face living in the District’s outermost exurbs.

Amani, an eye-catching cheetah feline, has a proud name that means aspiration and a strong family line that traces to Namibia and South Africa. Her rich genes make her one of the most important individuals in her small community just outside Front Royal, Va. Unlike people who pay up to $2,000 for ancestral DNA tests, Amani got hers free, courtesy of biologists at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute who study her every move, hoping her cubs will help increase the thinning cheetah populations at zoos across the country.

Read full article >>
Also found in: [+]
New to Nature No 128: Aetobatus narutobiei 27.7.2014 Guardian: Science
A ray once considered a pest on the shores of Japan turns out to be two species with serious implications for future conservation Continue reading...
Also found in: [+]
Adversaries on what's killing bees battle for our hearts and minds 26.7.2014 Star Tribune: Latest
Neither side is waiting for conclusive science on what’s killing the honeybee. They’re taking their fight straight to the public in an intensifying battle for the support of the nation’s consumers.
Also found in: [+]
Deadly fungus spreads in Everglades, killing trees 26.7.2014 Seattle Times: Nation & World
A fungus is felling trees across the Everglades and the damage may be leaving Florida’s fragile wetlands open to even more of an incursion from exotic plants.
Also found in: [+]
More trees felled in Everglades as deadly fungus spreads 25.7.2014 Guardian: Environment

Fungus spread by tiny redbay ambrosia beetle, which likely arrived in the US via a shipment of wood packing material

Continue reading...
Also found in: [+]
Deadly fungus spreads in Everglades, killing trees 25.7.2014 AP National
MIAMI (AP) -- A fungus carried by an invasive beetle from southeast Asia is felling trees across the Everglades, and experts have not found a way to stop the blight from spreading....
Also found in: [+]
Fungus spread by exotic beetle killing Everglades trees, adding to Fla's invasive species woes 25.7.2014 Star Tribune: Nation
Also found in: [+]
As cottonwood planting takes root, worries grow 25.7.2014 Minnesota Public Radio: News
When people hear about Maria DeLaundreau's summer cottonwood planting project, they think she's crazy. Plant more of those messy, trees? What about the seeds?
Also found in: [+]
Shark Fin Ban Signed Into Law 24.7.2014 Boston Globe: Latest
Cape Cod’s booming shark tourism business can breathe a little easier today: sale or possession of shark fins will soon be illegal in this state.
Also found in: [+]
This brand-new kingfisher is critically endangered 24.7.2014 New Scientist: News
A survey of birds has identified 361 new species that had previously been confused with known species, a quarter of which are considered ...
Also found in: [+]
Scotland announces 30 new marine protected areas 24.7.2014 The Guardian -- Front Page

Tranche of sites doubles the size of Scottish marine reserves, covering cliffs in Caithness and deep ocean seabeds

Rare and threatened species including common skate, the ocean quahog, flameshell beds and the black guillemot are being given extra protection after 30 new marine protected areas off the Scottish coast were announced on Thursday.

The network includes what is thought to be Europe's largest marine protected area (MPA) in the far north east of UK territorial waters, in the north east Faroe Shetland channel to conserve deep sea sponges, muds and geological features.

Continue reading...
Also found in: [+]
Put a price on nature? We must stop this neoliberal road to ruin 24.7.2014 The Guardian -- Front Page
The failure of the markets hasn't stopped the rise of the gobbledygook-filled Nature Capital Agenda. We can This is the transcript of George Monbiot's SPERI Annual Lecture, hosted by the Sheffield Political Economy Research Institute at the University of Sheffield. Ladies and gentlemen, we are witnessing the death of both the theory and the practice of neoliberal capitalism. This is the doctrine which holds that the market can resolve almost all social, economic and political problems. It holds that people are best served, and their prosperity is best advanced, by the minimum of intervention and spending by the state. It contends that we can maximise the general social interest through the pursuit of self-interest. "[the government] is a self-seeking flea on the backs of the more productive people of this world. ... governments do not run countries, they parasitize them." Look, we are failing spectacularly to protect the natural world and we are failing because people arent valuing it enough. Companies ...
Also found in: [+]
Kerala scientist finds 'oil-eating' bacteria 22.7.2014 New Kerala: World News
Thiruvananthapuram, July 22 : A scientist from Kerala has discovered three new species of oil-degrading bacteria from industrial waste.
Also found in: [+]
Wouldn’t you want to monitor these critters? 22.7.2014 Durango Herald
The Mountain Studies Institute has two training sessions involving classroom and field work scheduled for people who want to monitor a high-elevation relative of the rabbit that may be losing its home to global warming.The pika, which resembles a hamster, is disappearing in some Western mountains. Biologists say the tiny member of the...
Also found in: [+]
As numbers of gray seals rise, so do conflicts 20.7.2014 AP National
ROCKLAND, Maine (AP) -- Decades after gray seals were all but wiped out in New England waters, the population has rebounded so much that some frustrated residents are calling for a controlled hunt....
Also found in: [+]
As numbers of gray seals off New England rise, so do conflicts with fishermen and beachgoers 20.7.2014 Star Tribune: Nation
Also found in: [+]
Sorry, tiger: Why we should save weird species first 18.7.2014 New Scientist: Living World
With more than 4000 species on the brink of extinction and limited resources to help them, conservation needs to move beyond the cuteness factor (full text available to ...
Also found in: [+]
Big Butterfly Count kicks off with high hopes for spotting scarce tortoiseshell 18.7.2014 Guardian: Environment
UK-wide sightings could hit 1m but rarest and commonest British butterfly are hard to tell apart Continue reading...
Also found in: [+]
Sorry, panda: Why we should save weird species first 18.7.2014 New Scientist: News
With more than 4000 species on the brink of extinction and limited resources to help them, conservation needs to move beyond the cuteness factor (full text available to ...
Also found in: [+]
Dams reducing Indus river dolphin numbers 17.7.2014 New Kerala: World News
London, July 17 : Removal of river water for irrigation and habitat fragmentation by irrigation dams are decreasing the number of Indus river dolphins, says a study.
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 10,676