User: irge304 Topic: Biodiversity
Category: Protection :: Conservation Efforts
Last updated: Aug 31 2015 04:48 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Police find an escaped water buffalo 31.8.2015 Boston Globe: Latest
Police find an escaped water buffalo
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First photos of snow leopard cubs 29.8.2015 CNN: Top Stories
Can you say "awww"?
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These Cats May Be Extinct, but Locals Still See Them 29.8.2015 Wall St. Journal: Page One
Diana Marchibroda insists she saw the beast near the Appalachian Trail in Virginia in May. From the woods sauntered a “tall, very sleek” mountain lion, she says. Ms. Marchibroda, a dentist who is 62 years old, says she and her silver-haired miniature schnauzer, Sophie, “both watched in awe.”
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Managing rivers for wild and hatchery raised steelhead 29.8.2015 Seattle Times: Opinion
We should ensure that we can recover wild steelhead while still providing a fishing opportunity.
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Lydia Millet 28.8.2015 NY Times: Editorials
Lydia Millet
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Community Ag Alliance: Soil Health 101 28.8.2015 Steamboat Pilot
Have you ever thought of soil as a living ecosystem, composed of billions of tiny organisms working to support plants, animals and humans? Healthy soil is the foundation that sustains plentiful croplands and healthy forests, filters pollutants from air and water, maintains productive grazing lands for livestock and wildlife and helps control surface water flows. When we view soil in this way, rather than as an inert growing medium, we are able to recognize the importance of managing this ecosystem so it remains intact for future generations. Humans have the ability to change soil for better or worse, depending on how it is managed and protected. These management decisions can impact key functions provided by the soil, including, nutrient cycling, water relations, biodiversity and physical stability and support. Whether you farm or ranch hundreds of acres of land or compost in your backyard garden, the indicators of soil health remain the same. The ability to recognize these indicators and adapt ...
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Gabon: protecting vital forests, and communities 27.8.2015 The Guardian -- World Latest
The west African nation is working to balance competing demands of retaining biodiversity and mitigating climate change with the immediate needs of its people Anne-Marie Ndong Obiang has a machete attached to her belt, which she assures us is “for cutting off poachers’ fingers”. In her spotless forest-green camouflage uniform she does not appear to be joking. Working for Gabon’s National Parks Agency (ANPN) she has firsthand experience of the harsh conditions in the big reserves in the north of the country, some almost impenetrable. Gold prospectors, often from neighbouring Cameroon, have been known to leave craters 40 metres deep in the middle of the woods. Obiang is head of the Raponda Walker Arboretum close to the capital Libreville, which is on the Atlantic coast. Her priority here is to combat uncontrolled urban sprawl. “My fellow eco-wardens and myself can’t look the other way for a moment without someone starting to build beside the track,” she says. True enough quite substantial houses are ...
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Scientists squabble while Africa’s only penguins perish 27.8.2015 Seattle Times: Nation & World
CAPE TOWN, South Africa — They’re cute, knee-high, they bray like donkeys and are a tourist attraction near Cape Town. But African Penguins — the continent’s only species of the flightless bird — are at risk of extinction. As shoals of anchovies and sardines have migrated south into cooler waters, the population of African Penguins […]
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Scientists squabble while Africa's only penguins perish 27.8.2015 AP Top News
CAPE TOWN, South Africa (AP) -- They're cute, knee-high, they bray like donkeys and are a tourist attraction near Cape Town. But African Penguins - the continent's only species of the flightless bird - are at risk of extinction....
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Tibetan crane's winter habitat under threat from Indian hydroelectric project 27.8.2015 Guardian: Environment

Hydropower project in eastern Himalayas will destroy migration site of ‘vulnerable’ black-necked cranes, indigenous people and conservationists claim

A hydroelectric project in India’s eastern Himalayas will soon destroy one of the winter habitats of the magnificent Tibetan crane, a vulnerable bird regarded by local Buddhists as the reincarnation of a the sixth Dalai Lama, scientists and environmentalists have warned.

The Tibetan or black-necked crane, a species unique to Asia, has already disappeared from Vietnam, and can now be sighted only in parts of China, India and Bhutan, besides its main breeding grounds on the Tibetan plateau. It is listed as “vulnerable” on the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s Red List.

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Back from the brink: Lemurs of Madagascar 27.8.2015 CNN: Top Stories
Madagascar is a biodiversity hotspot unlike any other.
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The battle to protect Alaska’s great wildlife sanctuary | Rebecca Solnit 27.8.2015 Guardian: Environment
As Barack Obama opens up the Arctic Ocean to oil drilling, how can this pristine wilderness withstand the human hunger for fossil fuels? At midnight on 29 June, the sun was directly north and well above the hills. It had not gone down since I arrived in the Arctic, three days earlier, and would not set for weeks. It rolled around the sky like a marble in a bowl, sometimes behind clouds or mountains or the smoke of the three or four hundred wildfires somewhere south of us, but never below the horizon. The midnight sun made the green hilltops glow gold, and lit our walk through the wildflowers and the clouds of mosquitoes to the mountaintop. Down below, I could see our tents, our camp kitchen, tiny from the heights, and our two rafts, all along the sandy beach and flowery grass bench alongside the shallow Kongakut River. A few days earlier, a couple of bush planes had dropped off our group of nine for a week’s journey 65 miles down the river that threads its way from the Brooks Range of mountains to the ...
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Banned pesticides pose a greater risk to bees than thought, EU experts warn 26.8.2015 Guardian: Environment

New study by European Food and Safety Authority finds ‘high risk’ to bees from neonicotinoid pesticide sprays prompting calls for extending ban

Three pesticides banned in Europe for their potential to damage bee populations could pose an even greater threat than was thought, according to a new assessment by the European Food Safety Authority (Efsa).

Already proscribed for seed treatments and soil applications, the Efsa analysis says that clothianidin, imidacloprid and thiamethoxam also pose a ‘high risk’ to bees when sprayed on leaves.

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Conservationists appalled at illegal killing of 25m birds a year in the Mediterranean 26.8.2015 The Guardian -- World Latest
Glued, poisoned, trapped, shot – a shocking report reveals enforcement failure at a colossal scale as hunters across southern Europe and the Middle East kill birds with impunity The Egyptians line their beaches with fine two-metre high nets that can stretch for miles across the Nile delta and will catch any bird coming close; the Maltese will cover whole trees in nylon; the Cypriots smear branches in glue to stop birds flying; the Italians will kill nearly anything that flies and the French like to set metal traps for small birds. But the sheer scale of the cruelty of the illegal wild bird killings around the Mediterranean which was revealed last week has shocked conservationists and birdlovers across ...
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Group threatens to sue over farmed salmon in Puget Sound 26.8.2015 Seattle Times: Local
A conservation group says it intends to sue the federal government for allowing farm-raised salmon in Puget Sound.
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Ohio zoo sending endangered rhino to Indonesia to mate 25.8.2015 Seattle Times: Nation & World
CINCINNATI (AP) — An Ohio zoo that has the last Sumatran rhino in the United States announced plans Tuesday to send him to Southeast Asia on a mission to mate and help preserve his critically endangered species. Conservation experts at the Cincinnati Zoo say 8-year-old Harapan could be on his way within several weeks to […]
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Group threatens to sue over farmed salmon in Puget Sound 25.8.2015 AP Washington
SEATTLE (AP) -- A conservation group says it intends to sue the federal government for allowing farm-raised salmon in Puget Sound....
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Ohio zoo sending endangered rhino to Indonesia to mate 25.8.2015 Chicago Tribune: Nation
An Ohio zoo that has the last Sumatran rhino in the United States on Tuesday announced plans to send the endangered species to Southeast Asia on a mission to ...
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Ohio zoo sending endangered rhino to Indonesia to mate 25.8.2015 AP Top News
CINCINNATI (AP) -- An Ohio zoo that has the last Sumatran rhino in the United States on Tuesday announced plans to send him to Southeast Asia on a mission to mate and help preserve his critically endangered species....
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Last Sumatran rhino in the US to be sent to Indonesia to mate 25.8.2015 Guardian: Environment

Harapan, who resides at the Cincinnati Zoo, will fly to south-east Asia where most of the estimated 100 remaining rhinos live

An Ohio zoo that has the last Sumatran rhino in the US on Tuesday announced plans to send the endangered species to south-east Asia on a mission to mate.

Conservation experts at the Cincinnati Zoo say eight-year-old Harapan will soon be on his way to Indonesia, where nearly all of the estimated 100 remaining Sumatran rhinos live. Numbers of the two-horned descendants of Ice Age wooly rhinos have fallen by some 90% since the mid-1980s as development of their south-east Asia forest habitat and poachers seeking their prized horns took their toll.

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