User: irge304 Topic: Biodiversity
Category: Protection :: Conservation Efforts
Last updated: Feb 12 2016 12:47 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Obama creates 3 new national monuments to protect 1.8 million acres of California desert 12.2.2016 LA Times: Science

President Obama designated three new national monuments in the California desert Thursday, expanding federal protection to 1.8 million acres of landscapes that have retained their natural beauty despite decades of heavy mining, cattle ranching and off-roading.

The designation was requested by U.S....

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Officials in Hawaii create nursery for fast-growing coral 12.2.2016 Seattle Times: Local

HONOLULU (AP) — Most of Hawaii’s species of coral is unlike other coral around the world in that it grows very slowly, making restoration projects for endangered reefs in the state difficult. But officials in Hawaii have come up with a plan to grow large chunks of coral in a fraction of the time it […]
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Love giant insects? Meet the tree lobster, back from the brink 11.2.2016 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
The 8-inch insect nearly went extinct when hungry rats overran its island. But Melbourne scientists found a few in 2001 and started a thriving colony. Now the San Diego Zoo is hatching them, too.
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Namibia's wildlife caught by camera trap - in pictures 11.2.2016 Guardian: Environment

Photographer Will Burrard-Lucas spent three months in Namibia on assignment for WWF using a specially adapted DSLR camera trap to take close-up portraits of the country’s most elusive wildlife. His incredible images will help scientists better understand migration patterns and establish additional protected areas

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Love Giant Insects? Meet The Tree Lobster, Back From The Brink 11.2.2016 NPR: Morning Edition
The 8-inch insect nearly went extinct when hungry rats overran its island. But Melbourne scientists found a few in 2001 and started a thriving colony. Now the San Diego Zoo is hatching them, too.
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Utah sues federal government over plan to protect greater sage-grouse 10.2.2016 Guardian: Environment

Federal plan stops short of listing bird that once numbered in the millions as an endangered species but western state fears mining and agriculture will suffer

The greater sage-grouse, a bird best known for its flamboyant mating ritual, has become embroiled in a tussle over states’ rights, with Utah suing the federal government over its protection of the threatened species.

Utah’s lawsuit claims that a federal plan to protect the sage-grouse has “overthrown” the state’s own work to safeguard the species and will prevent the state from using vast tracts of land for mining or agriculture. The greater sage-grouse is a ground-dwelling bird that has been described as resembling an “avant-garde turkey”.

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Florida man charged with throwing alligator into Wendy's 10.2.2016 Chicago Tribune: Nation
Florida authorities have arrested a man accused of throwing a live alligator through a restaurant's drive-thru window. Investigators identified Joshua James, of Jupiter, Florida, as the man who tossed the 3 1/2-foot reptile into a Wendy's last fall, according to a Florida Fish and Wildlife ...
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Scientists call for import ban to save Europe’s salamanders from skin-eating fungus 9.2.2016 Guardian: Environment

Urgent trade embargo on live Asian species is needed to prevent a virulent disease from wiping out European newts and salamander populations

A skin-eating fungus could eradicate newts and salamanders from large tracts of Europe by 2020 unless a ban on live imports of Asian species is urgently introduced, a group of scientists and NGOs has warned.

The US embargoed 201 species last month in a crackdown on the virulent Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans or “Bsal” fungus, which is thought to originate in Asia.

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Could lemurs soon be extinct? 9.2.2016 CNN: Top Stories
90% of the Madagascar's lemurs "are on the verge of extinction," says one of the country's leading scientists.
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Trouble in paradise: Lord Howe Island divided over plan to exterminate rats 9.2.2016 The Guardian -- Front Page
Rodents are threatening the unique natural environment of Australia’s sparsely populated Lord Howe Island. But a plan to eradicate the pests by dropping 42 tonnes of poisoned cereal is splitting the close-knit community in half Described by the UN as “an area of spectacular and scenic landscapes”, Lord Howe Island is nothing if not dramatic. Formed from an inferno of underwater volcanoes more than six million years ago, the 10km long crescent-shaped island sits in a bath of turquoise water, exactly where the warm East Australian Current meets the icy waters of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. Those ancient lava flows left a rugged landscape with steep cliffs, which drop off into an ocean which supports the world’s most southerly coral reef. Between those cliffs and the reef lies a calm blue lagoon that laps against a yellow-sand ...
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Tourists enjoy traditional, ecological tastes in Japan 8.2.2016 New Kerala: World News
Kanagawa / Yokohama, (Japan), Feb.8, : Several hot-spots are located in Japan that treat guests with their traditional way-of-life. Hakone, a town in Kanagawa prefecture, has been one of the best international holiday resorts for centuries.
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Why a diet of worms could be good for you 8.2.2016 The Guardian -- Front Page
Forget tablets to get rid of the wriggly creatures. Some scientists believe eating them may be key to curing auto-immune diseases For hundreds of thousands of years, worms have been infecting humans, burrowing into our bodies, setting up shop in our organs and generally making themselves at home. Until about 150 years ago, nearly everyone who ever lived was probably infected with some parasitic worm or other. Worms can cause intestinal problems, anaemia and, depending on the species, more severe problems, including seizures and paralysis. But, with modern sanitation, we have eradicated them from many parts of the world – a great public health success. However, growing numbers of scientists have begun to argue that the loss of these parasites, known as helminths, has led to a spike in a range of illnesses, including autoimmune diseases, allergies and asthma, and even depression and other mental health problems. They say that worms, or drugs developed from them, could be potent treatments for these ...
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Advice for fish eaters 8.2.2016 LA Times: Science

Here's some advice for fish eaters from California's Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment:

•In the same location, some fish species can have higher chemical levels than others. If possible, eat smaller amounts of several types of fish rather than a large amount of one type.

•Eat only...

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Advice for fish eaters 8.2.2016 LA Times: Commentary

Here's some advice for fish eaters from California's Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment:

•In the same location, some fish species can have higher chemical levels than others. If possible, eat smaller amounts of several types of fish rather than a large amount of one type.

•Eat only...

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RSPB plans ‘bat-friendly’ wind turbines at Bedfordshire HQ 7.2.2016 Guardian: Environment
The charity, known for its opposition to turbines, claims to have commissioned a turbine that will not threaten local pipistrelle and noctule bats

It is renowned for its opposition to the installation of wind turbines across the nation. According to the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, the machines’ blades pose too much of a threat to local species in many areas.

But now the RSPB has joined the opposition. The organisation has agreed to the construction of an 800kW wind turbine at Sandy in Bedfordshire – the site of its headquarters and one of its most important nature reserves.

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Zika virus: Is DDT an option? 5.2.2016 CNN: Top Stories
A relatively new mosquito-borne virus known as Zika has rapidly spread to more than two dozen countries.
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It's past time for L.A. to seriously regulate its oil and gas wells 4.2.2016 LA Times: Commentary

For decades, city officials in Los Angeles have taken a hands-off approach to oil and gas drilling, allowing companies to operate and even expand near homes and schools with little scrutiny. Now faced with increasing pressure from community and environmental groups, elected officials are beginning...

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A wild jaguar in the U.S.? 4.2.2016 CNN: Top Stories
Among the large cats roaming the Earth, the jaguar is the only one native to North and South America.
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Report: Climate change threatens food fish in Northeast 4.2.2016 Seattle Times: Local

PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Fish and shellfish that humans rely on for food and that are important to the economy are on a list of Northeastern marine species considered most vulnerable to climate change, a federal government report released Wednesday and published by the journal PLOS ONE said. The study ranged from Cape Hatteras, North […]
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Video shows only known wild jaguar in US at home in Arizona mountains 4.2.2016 Guardian: Environment

The big cat, known as ‘El Jefe’, has been living in 25 miles south of downtown Tucson – half a century after the last verified US jaguar was killed by a hunter

The only known wild jaguar in the United States is seen roaming around a creek and other parts of a mountain range just south of Tucson, Arizona in the first publicly released video of the big cat.

Related: Eastern Cougar extinct, no longer needs protection, says US conservation agency

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