User: irge304 Topic: Biodiversity
Category: Endangered Species
Last updated: Sep 01 2015 14:51 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Fight To Save The Sage Grouse Finds Friends In All Corners Of The West 1.9.2015 NPR News
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will decide whether to list the greater sage grouse as endangered. Many groups, including some oil and gas firms and a conservation group don't want that to happen.
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Is Obama hypocritical on Arctic? 1.9.2015 CNN: Top Stories
Obama's on a climate tour of Alaska this week.
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Plastic Poses a Growing Threat to Seabirds, Study Says 1.9.2015 NYT: Home Page
Plastic Poses a Growing Threat to Seabirds, Study Says
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Five near-blind monk seals become ambassadors for vanishing species 31.8.2015 Guardian: Environment
For the first time, Hawaiian monk seals are on public display outside of the Aloha State. Conservationists hope the new ambassadors at the Minnesota Zoo will help bring more attention (and funds) to the endangered, declining species. The Hawaiians call their monk seals ilio-holo-i-ka-uaua or “the dog that runs in rough water,” but when I see my first one, I think: whoa, that’s more like a bear. And indeed, a female Hawaiian monk seal weighs up to 240 kilograms – about the size of a Eurasian brown bear. Although the Hawaiian monk seals are clearly powerful, hefty animals – twice as heavy as an English mastiff – their wide, black, velvety eyes make them hard to resist. And I find myself quickly enamoured. You may think I’m on a Hawaiian beach soaking up the sun when I see my first living, breathing monk seals, but I’m not. I’m thousands of miles away in the cold, landlocked Midwest at a press event a few days before the public debut of five female seals at the Minnesota Zoo . It’s a landmark debut: these ...
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First photos of snow leopard cubs 29.8.2015 CNN: Top Stories
Can you say "awww"?
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These Cats May Be Extinct, but Locals Still See Them 29.8.2015 Wall St. Journal: Page One
Diana Marchibroda insists she saw the beast near the Appalachian Trail in Virginia in May. From the woods sauntered a “tall, very sleek” mountain lion, she says. Ms. Marchibroda, a dentist who is 62 years old, says she and her silver-haired miniature schnauzer, Sophie, “both watched in awe.”
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Managing rivers for wild and hatchery raised steelhead 29.8.2015 Seattle Times: Opinion
We should ensure that we can recover wild steelhead while still providing a fishing opportunity.
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Lydia Millet 28.8.2015 NY Times: Editorials
Lydia Millet
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Panda mum Mei Xiang grooms surviving cub following death of smaller newborn – video 28.8.2015 Guardian: Science

Giant panda Mei Xiang shows proper maternal care to her surviving cub a day after the smaller twin died. It is common for a mother to favour the stronger cub, decreasing the other’s chance of survival. The births at Washington DC’s National zoo captured international attention as giant pandas are among the world’s most endangered species with about 300 in captivity and roughly 1,600 in the wild

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Chinook fishery at Buoy 10 near Lower Columbia River mouth to close after Friday 28.8.2015 Seattle Times: Top stories
Well it looks like the chinook catch at Buoy 10 near the Lower Columbia mouth remained so good that state Fish and Wildlife has decided to require anglers to release all chinook after Friday, Aug. 28. Record catch rates prompted Washington and Oregon fishery managers to close the area for chinook fishing. Even with the […]
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Expert: Sea level rise 'locked-in' 28.8.2015 CNN: Top Stories
It was less than two years ago that the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released its all-encompassing assessment on the current state of climate change research and made projections for the future climate of our planet.
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Gabon: protecting vital forests, and communities 27.8.2015 The Guardian -- World Latest
The west African nation is working to balance competing demands of retaining biodiversity and mitigating climate change with the immediate needs of its people Anne-Marie Ndong Obiang has a machete attached to her belt, which she assures us is “for cutting off poachers’ fingers”. In her spotless forest-green camouflage uniform she does not appear to be joking. Working for Gabon’s National Parks Agency (ANPN) she has firsthand experience of the harsh conditions in the big reserves in the north of the country, some almost impenetrable. Gold prospectors, often from neighbouring Cameroon, have been known to leave craters 40 metres deep in the middle of the woods. Obiang is head of the Raponda Walker Arboretum close to the capital Libreville, which is on the Atlantic coast. Her priority here is to combat uncontrolled urban sprawl. “My fellow eco-wardens and myself can’t look the other way for a moment without someone starting to build beside the track,” she says. True enough quite substantial houses are ...
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Scientists squabble while Africa’s only penguins perish 27.8.2015 Seattle Times: Nation & World
CAPE TOWN, South Africa — They’re cute, knee-high, they bray like donkeys and are a tourist attraction near Cape Town. But African Penguins — the continent’s only species of the flightless bird — are at risk of extinction. As shoals of anchovies and sardines have migrated south into cooler waters, the population of African Penguins […]
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Scientists squabble while Africa's only penguins perish 27.8.2015 AP Top News
CAPE TOWN, South Africa (AP) -- They're cute, knee-high, they bray like donkeys and are a tourist attraction near Cape Town. But African Penguins - the continent's only species of the flightless bird - are at risk of extinction....
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Tibetan crane's winter habitat under threat from Indian hydroelectric project 27.8.2015 Guardian: Environment

Hydropower project in eastern Himalayas will destroy migration site of ‘vulnerable’ black-necked cranes, indigenous people and conservationists claim

A hydroelectric project in India’s eastern Himalayas will soon destroy one of the winter habitats of the magnificent Tibetan crane, a vulnerable bird regarded by local Buddhists as the reincarnation of a the sixth Dalai Lama, scientists and environmentalists have warned.

The Tibetan or black-necked crane, a species unique to Asia, has already disappeared from Vietnam, and can now be sighted only in parts of China, India and Bhutan, besides its main breeding grounds on the Tibetan plateau. It is listed as “vulnerable” on the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s Red List.

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Ocean warming and acidification needs more attention, argues US 27.8.2015 Guardian: Environment
  • Concern growing over climate change-induced warming on marine life
  • US to raise issue in Paris climate talks and call for more research

The US government has urged the international community to focus more on the impact of climate change on the oceans, amid growing concern over changes affecting corals, shellfish and other marine life.

Related: Naomi Klein on climate change: 'I thought it best to write about my own raw terror'

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Back from the brink: Lemurs of Madagascar 27.8.2015 CNN: Top Stories
Madagascar is a biodiversity hotspot unlike any other.
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The battle to protect Alaska’s great wildlife sanctuary | Rebecca Solnit 27.8.2015 Guardian: Environment
As Barack Obama opens up the Arctic Ocean to oil drilling, how can this pristine wilderness withstand the human hunger for fossil fuels? At midnight on 29 June, the sun was directly north and well above the hills. It had not gone down since I arrived in the Arctic, three days earlier, and would not set for weeks. It rolled around the sky like a marble in a bowl, sometimes behind clouds or mountains or the smoke of the three or four hundred wildfires somewhere south of us, but never below the horizon. The midnight sun made the green hilltops glow gold, and lit our walk through the wildflowers and the clouds of mosquitoes to the mountaintop. Down below, I could see our tents, our camp kitchen, tiny from the heights, and our two rafts, all along the sandy beach and flowery grass bench alongside the shallow Kongakut River. A few days earlier, a couple of bush planes had dropped off our group of nine for a week’s journey 65 miles down the river that threads its way from the Brooks Range of mountains to the ...
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As vulture populations wane, perils to ecosystems circle 27.8.2015 Seattle Times: Nation & World
A decline in vulture populations has thrown off the balance of nature as well as underlining the effects of poaching, poisoning and other human interventions.
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Last Sumatran rhino in U.S. seeks mate 26.8.2015 CNN: Top Stories
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