User: irge304 Topic: Biodiversity
Category: Species Loss
Last updated: Feb 20 2018 09:11 IST RSS 2.0
 
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How Did an All-Female Species Survive Sans Sexual Reproduction for Millennia? 19.2.2018 The Wire

By all means, the Amazon molly should have gone extinct by now. Except it has not.

The post How Did an All-Female Species Survive Sans Sexual Reproduction for Millennia? appeared first on The Wire.

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U.S. efforts once saved the red wolf. But missteps may push the species back to the brink. 11.2.2018 Washington Post
Three decades after they were reintroduced to the wild, there is serious doubt that the species can survive outside zoos. The story of the rise and fall of the red wolf population at a North Carolina refuge is a testament to the power of the Endangered Species Act to protect wildlife — and its limitations.
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That dinosaur-killing asteroid also triggered massive magma releases beneath the ocean, study finds 8.2.2018 LA Times: Science

The asteroid that hit Earth 66 million years ago appears to have caused huge amounts of magma to spew out of the bottom of the ocean, a new study of seafloor data finds.

The discovery, described in the journal Science Advances, adds to the portrait of an extinction event that was as complex as...

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Despite burst of January snow, Colorado mountain snowpack stays grim — with record low levels at some sites 7.2.2018 Denver Post: Local
Colorado mountain snowpack bounced back a bit in January but remains exceptionally low, with the overall statewide average at 59 percent of the norm, and water suppliers say they’re increasingly anxious about prospects for drought.
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Red wolves may be going extinct in the wild — again 6.2.2018 Washington Post
Red wolves may be going extinct in the wild — again
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Study: Mammals May Be Better Equipped to Adapt to Climate Change 3.2.2018 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by Project Earth/Fusion and appears here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.  The story of the tortoise and the hare teaches us that slow and steady wins the race. But when it comes to adapting to changing environmental conditions, Aesop (the ancient Greek storyteller credited with the fable) isn’t quite on the money. […]
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One of the world's rarest fish is a little less rare than we thought 26.1.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: News
The red handfish, named for hand-shaped fins on the sides of its body, doesn't really swim -- it walks slowly along the seafloor. A new population of the striking creature has been found off Tasmania.
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A spider that hunts other spiders: 18 new species of this bizarre Madagascar arachnid are unveiled 26.1.2018 LA Times: Commentary
Scientists have identified 18 new species of pelcian spider. Also called assassin spiders, these critters hunt other arachnids using their long fang-tipped "jaws" to impale their prey.
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Why you’re still hungry: 6 obstacles to healthy eating 23.1.2018 Washington Post
Why you’re still hungry: 6 obstacles to healthy eating
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Strange weather triggered bacteria that killed 200,000 endangered antelope 18.1.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Over a three-week span in 2015, more than 200,000 saiga antelope suddenly died in Kazakhstan. The animals would be grazing normally, then dead in three hours. A new study points to heat and humidity.
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The Daily 202: Trump has no nominees for 245 important jobs, including an ambassador to South Korea 12.1.2018 Washington Post: Politics
The president lags his predecessors in filling posts that make government work.
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Soon the Only Coral Reefs We See Will Be on the Nature Channel 7.1.2018 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by Grist and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. For decades, marine scientists have been warning of the demise of coral reefs in a warming world. But now, those warning calls have reached a full-scale alarm, leaving researchers at a loss for exactly how best to save the reefs. […]
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When two different types of birds mated, a new species, Big Bird, was born 7.1.2018 Washington Post: World
Scientists studying interbreeding say such swift evolution may not be all that uncommon.
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The National Zoo gets the purrfect resident: A 310-pound tiger 6.1.2018 Washington Post
The National Zoo gets the purrfect resident: A 310-pound tiger
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The Delta Smelt heads for extinction, marking a half-century of failed California water policy 5.1.2018 LA Times: Commentary

You might wish you had as much power to affect the environment and the economy as the Delta Smelt.

Enemies have blamed the tiny freshwater fish for putting farmers out of business across California’s breadbasket, forcing the fallowing of vast acres of arable land, creating double-digit unemployment...

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Bid to save rare freshwater river mussel in Wales 2.1.2018 BBC: Business
Conservationists have bred 1,300 freshwater pearl mussels to be released back into Welsh rivers.
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Republicans’ attack on conservation law would shock their conservative predecessors 29.12.2017 Washington Post
Republicans’ attack on conservation law would shock their conservative predecessors
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Feature and TV films 16.12.2017 LA Times: Commentary
Movies on TV the week of Dec. 17 - 23, 2017
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We must protect biodiversity 15.12.2017 Washington Post: Op-Eds
We must protect biodiversity
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The Energy 202: The Pentagon takes climate change very seriously. This government watchdog says that's not enough. 13.12.2017 Washington Post: Politics
GAO says talk is not sufficient.
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