User: irge304 Topic: Biodiversity
Category: Species Loss
Last updated: May 26 2017 07:46 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Butterflies at Chatfield Farms hopes to enchant visitors with the state’s native pollinators 26.5.2017 Denver Post: Lifestyles
The butterfly house, a partnership between the Butterfly Pavilion and Denver Botanic Gardens, intends to draw people inside its warm habitat with the sell of beautiful insects surrounded by flowers. But once inside, the organizations hope Coloradans will become more attached to their native pollinators, which have seen populations plummet, and leave wanting to help.
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Size of whale has evolved in the recent past! 24.5.2017 New Kerala: World News
Size of whale has evolved in the recent past!
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Science Says: Whale of a mystery solved? How they got so big 24.5.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists think they have answered a whale of a mystery: How the ocean creatures got so huge so quickly. A few million years ago, the largest whales, averaged maybe 15 feet long. That’s big, but you could still hold a fossil skull in two hands. Then seemingly overnight, one type of whale […]
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George F. Will: Federal power spins its ever-growing web 21.5.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Washington • A blind spider creeping through America’s judicial thicket might be heading to the Supreme Court, which will have to decide if the contentment or even the survival of the Bone Cave Harvestman spider species, which lives only in two central Texas counties, is any of the federal government’s business. If it is, what isn’t? The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), which administers the Endangered Species Act, is blind to the limits of its imperium, which it thinks encompasses tellin...
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Many Of California's Salmon Populations Unlikely To Survive The Century 18.5.2017 NPR News
Climate change, damns and agriculture are threatening Chinook salmon, the iconic fish at the core of the state's fishing industry, a report predicts. And 23 other fish species are also seen in danger.
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An 'evolutionary gamble' may be killing Joshua Tree's mother tortoises 16.5.2017 LA Times: Environment

Wildlife biologists say an alarming number of female desert tortoise carcasses found earlier this year just outside the southern edge of Joshua Tree National Park may be the result of mothers fighting extinction by exhausting their water and energy to lay eggs, even under stress.

U.S. Geological...

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'Winged' snakes once slithered the Earth 13.5.2017 New Kerala: World News
'Winged' snakes once slithered the Earth
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As rains ease in the West, cactuses shine brighter than ever 12.5.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

A superbloom spring is turning surly cacti into colorful beauties that beckon for attention.
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Star-crossed salmon survive spillway’s erosion but suffocate 12.5.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — A quarter-million hatchery salmon survived the near-collapse of a California dam’s spillway this winter, only to suffocate after a pump failed this week, officials said Thursday. They were among about 5 million baby fall-run Chinook salmon that were rescued in February after tons of mud washed down the Feather River, said […]
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African lions may share same fate as extinct sabre-toothed tigers 11.5.2017 New Kerala: World News
African lions may share same fate as extinct sabre-toothed tigers
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Santa Monica's new back-to-nature beach project has drawn the attention of rare birds. But can beach-goers let them live in peace? 10.5.2017 LA Times: Commentary

On a popular beach that is groomed, sifted and devoid of vegetation, Santa Monica officials and a local environmental group are restoring three acres of sand to a more natural state.

The city and the Bay Foundation have fenced off a swath of shoreline, planted native species and taken steps to...

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Scientists in South Africa reveal more on human-like species 9.5.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
A meticulous dating process showed that Homo naledi, which had a mix of human-like and more primitive characteristics such as a small brain, existed in a surprisingly recent period in paleontological terms.
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Scientists in South Africa reveal more on human-like species 9.5.2017 Washington Post: World
A species belonging to the human family tree whose remnants were first discovered in a South African cave in 2013 lived several hundred thousand years ago, indicating that the creature was alive at the same time as early humans in Africa, scientists said Tuesday.
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Scientists in South Africa reveal more on human-like species 9.5.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
JOhannesburg • A species belonging to the human family tree whose remnants were first discovered in a South African cave in 2013 lived several hundred thousand years ago, indicating that the creature was alive at the same time as early humans in Africa, scientists said Tuesday. A meticulous dating process showed that Homo naledi (nah-LEH-dee), which had a mix of human-like and more primitive characteristics such as a small brain, existed in a surprisingly recent period in paleontological terms, ...
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Scientists in South Africa reveal more on human-like species 9.5.2017 AP Top News
JOHANNESBURG (AP) -- A species belonging to the human family tree whose remnants were first discovered in a South African cave in 2013 lived several hundred thousand years ago, indicating that the creature was alive at the same time as early humans in Africa, scientists said Tuesday....
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Midwest wolves may find themselves in the crosshairs again 7.5.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: News
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has repeatedly tried to remove wolves in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan states from the endangered species list, but courts have stymied those efforts.
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Midwest wolves may find themselves in the crosshairs again 7.5.2017 AP National
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) -- Gray wolves in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan could again find themselves in hunters' crosshairs - possibly as soon as this fall if federal protections are removed for the predators....
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'Eat to extinction 5.5.2017 BBC: Business
E-commerce giant Alibaba and travel firms see a business opportunity in Denmark's invasion problem.
Eric K. Ganshert: Colorado does need wolves 4.5.2017 Steamboat Pilot
Contrary to Mr. Bowers’ beliefs (stated in a letter to the editor in the May 4 issue of Steamboat Today), Colorado needs wolves. I encourage him to learn of the historic ranges of the Western Grey Wolf species. "Predatory Bureaucracy: The Extermination of Wolves and the Transformation of the West" by Michael Robinson is a good starting point. Additionally, interested parties should learn about “anthropogenic trophic downgrading” and the downstream impacts, known as “trophic cascades.” These impacts resonate from waterway health to the overall biodiversity of ecosystems and have been documented by dozens of studies published in peer-reviewed journals. William J. Ripple and Robert L. Beschta are PhD ecologists who have produced thorough literature on the subject. If Mr. Bowers’ concerns are for that of the hunting/livestock industry, I challenge him to produce data that proves wolves make a significant impact. According to the USDA’s 2011 cattle death report, predator kills of cattle amounted to a ...
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‘Aww’ inspiring: NYC Zoo unveils fluffy Andean bear cub 4.5.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

NEW YORK (AP) — An “aww” inspiring bear cub is making his public debut in New York City. The Wildlife Conservation Society’s Queens Zoo says the 25-pound bundle of joy is being slowly acclimated to an outdoor exhibit. The Andean bear cub is still awaiting a name. The ball of fluff has a white, freckled […]
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