User: irge304 Topic: Biodiversity
Category: Biodiversity Threats
Last updated: Mar 24 2017 17:46 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Scott Pruitt Is a Nightmare—But Reagan's EPA Boss Was Worse 24.3.2017 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by High Country News and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. March 25, 1983, business was booming at Harry's Liquor, Wine & Cheese, near the Environmental Protection Agency's Washington, D.C., headquarters. EPA employees were in the mood to party. The agency's top lawyer had just resigned, the latest casualty in a purge of political appointees. Weeks earlier, EPA Administrator Anne Gorsuch Burford had also resigned amid a ballooning controversy over her management of the Superfund program. Agency staff celebrated by springing for eight cases of champagne and six ounces of Russian caviar from Harry's. One employee even took vacation time to sell commemorative T-shirts to his colleagues. They read: "I Survived the Ice Queen's Acid Reign." The EPA was only a decade old when Gorsuch, as she was then known—she married Bureau of Land Management Director Robert Burford in 1983—became its first female administrator. Gorsuch, a conservative state ...
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FEATURE: Humanity at the core as UN readies for first-ever Ocean Conference 23.3.2017 New Kerala: World News
FEATURE: Humanity at the core as UN readies for first-ever Ocean Conference
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The best use of California's dead trees: Leave them in the mountains 22.3.2017 LA Times: Commentary

To the editor: Science refutes virtually every claim in Jacques Leslie’s ode to logging. Dead trees, which Leslie would have removed from the Sierra Nevada and used for energy, don’t make wildfires worse; in fact, they can slow hot fires moving through the forest canopy. High-severity fire isn’t...

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Despite global warming, these underwater species still serve as source of food 22.3.2017 New Kerala: World News
Despite global warming, these underwater species still serve as source of food
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Why global warming could lead to a rise of 100,000 diabetes cases a year in the U.S. 21.3.2017 LA Times: Science

If the average temperature rises by 1 degree Celsius, sea levels will rise, crop yields will fall and vulnerable species will see their habitat shrink or disappear.

And, a new study suggests, the number of American adults suffering from diabetes would rise by more than 100,000 a year.

Experts have...

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How Trump's Supreme Court Pick Quietly Wipes Out Environmental Cases 20.3.2017 Mother Jones
Faced with the Trump administration's assault on regulations, environmental advocates are planning to turn to the courts to limit some of the damage. Green groups are already crafting lawsuits to block any efforts to roll back rules on power plant emissions, vehicle pollution, coal mining, and pipeline permits. Environmentalists have been studying the record of Trump's Supreme Court nominee, 10th Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Neil Gorsuch, whose Senate confirmation hearings begin Monday. They are trying to understand how he might handle cases on Obama-era climate initiatives, air pollution, and water quality, which may one day end up at the Supreme Court. Chief among their concerns are whether he will even allow them to have their day in court at all. "He’s not one of those judges who wants to swing the courthouse doors [open] to environmental suits," says Michael Gerrard, Columbia University Director of the Sabin Center for Climate Change Law. "It would lower their probability for success for those few ...
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Phone and forest 19.3.2017 BBC: Technology
How a remote community in Guyana is using cutting-edge software and equipment against deforestation.
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How the Great Barrier Reef is responding to global warming. (Hint: not well) 18.3.2017 LA Times: Science

Global warming has likely caused permanent damage to the world's largest coral reef, according to a new report in the journal Nature.

In the last 20 years, rising temperatures have triggered three severe bleaching events in Australia’s Great Barrier Reef. The most recent was in 2016, when more...

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Extreme heat has caused the Great Barrier Reef to bleach three times in the last 20 years 18.3.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Global warning has likely caused permanent damage to the world's largest coral reef, according to a new report in the journal Nature.

In the last 20 years, rising temperatures have triggered three severe bleaching events in Australia’s Great Barrier Reef. The most recent was in 2016, when more...

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As the planet gets hotter, some mammals may get smaller 16.3.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Fifty-six million years ago, about 10 million years after the dinosaurs went extinct, something strange happened to our planet.

It got hot.

Really hot.

Hotter than it had ever been since the Earth formed a few billion years earlier.

Carbon signatures in the geological record show that global temperature...

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Watch out: Mammals shrink when Earth heats up, study says 15.3.2017 AP Top News
WASHINGTON (AP) -- Global warming shrank certain animals in the ancient past, and scientists worry it could happen again....
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Correction: Global Coral Die-Off story 14.3.2017 Washington Post: World
In early versions of a story March 13 about dying coral reefs, The Associated Press misspelled the name of the organization that documents reefs worldwide. The correct spelling is XL Catlin Seaview Survey, not XL Caitlin Seaview Survey.
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Correction: Global Coral Die-Off story 14.3.2017 AP Top News
SOUTH ARI ATOLL, Maldives (AP) -- In early versions of a story March 13 about dying coral reefs, The Associated Press misspelled the name of the organization that documents reefs worldwide. The correct spelling is XL Catlin Seaview Survey, not XL Caitlin Seaview Survey....
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Exploring the death, and life, of the Great Lakes 14.3.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Journalist Dan Egan dives into the history of the Great Lakes and the problems facing the natural resource.
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Safe havens for species mapped in 3 Northwest states 13.3.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

The Nature Conservancy is mapping and protecting areas in Washington, Oregon and Idaho that are most likely to sustain native species amid climate change.
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Scientists race to prevent wipeout of world's coral reefs 13.3.2017 AP Top News
SOUTH ARI ATOLL, Maldives (AP) -- There were startling colors here just a year ago, a dazzling array of life beneath the waves. Now this Maldivian reef is dead, killed by the stress of rising ocean temperatures. What's left is a haunting expanse of gray, a scene repeated in reefs across the globe in what has fast become a full-blown ecological catastrophe....
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Scientists race to prevent wipeout of world’s coral reefs 13.3.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

SOUTH ARI ATOLL, Maldives (AP) — There were startling colors here just a year ago, a dazzling array of life beneath the waves. Now this Maldivian reef is dead, killed by the stress of rising ocean temperatures. What’s left is a haunting expanse of gray, a scene repeated in reefs across the globe in what […]
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Scientists race to prevent wipeout of world’s coral reefs 13.3.2017 Washington Post: World
There were startling colors here just a year ago, a dazzling array of life beneath the waves. Now this Maldivian reef is dead, killed by the stress of rising ocean temperatures. What’s left is a haunting expanse of gray, a scene repeated in reefs across the globe in what has fast become a full-blown ecological catastrophe.
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Conservation group maps land protection strategy in 3 states 12.3.2017 AP Washington
BOISE, Idaho (AP) -- A conservation group has created maps identifying key landscapes in three Western states most likely to sustain native species amid climate change and is distributing money to protect private lands in those areas through use-limiting easements or outright purchases....
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Conservation group maps land protection strategy in 3 states 12.3.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

BOISE, Idaho (AP) — A conservation group has created maps identifying key landscapes in three Western states most likely to sustain native species amid climate change and is distributing money to protect private lands in those areas through use-limiting easements or outright purchases. The Nature Conservancy says it has $6 million from the Doris Duke […]
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