User: irge304 Topic: Biodiversity
Category: Hotspots
Last updated: Mar 13 2015 22:40 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Icy pools are oases for unique glacier ecosystems 13.3.2015 New Scientist: Opinion
Water bears, not polar bears, rule the glacial holes that are hotspots for invertebrates. But the very dust which helps the holes form may lead to their ...
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Plant genus named after Sir David Attenborough 4.2.2015 Guardian: Environment

Key taxonomical classification of rare plant with fleshy flowers discovered in the rainforest of Gabon in central Africa is named after British naturalist

Grasshoppers, shrimps, spiders and other creatures have all been named after Sir David Attenborough, but now a whole genus of endangered plants will bear the naturalist’s name.

Identified by a team of researchers in Gabon, a renowned botanical hotspot, the Sirdavidia flowering plants are believed to be the first plant genus – a taxonomical ranking one step above a species – named after the broadcaster.

Related: Species named after Sir David Attenborough - in pictures

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Roads are encroaching deeper into the Amazon rainforest, study says 28.1.2015 Guardian: Environment

Oil and gas access roads in western Amazon could open up ‘Pandora’s box’ of environmental impacts

Oil and gas roads are encroaching deeper into the western Amazon, one of the world’s last wildernesses and biodiversity hotspots, according to a new study.

Roads across Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and western Brazil could open up a ‘Pandora’s box’ of negative environmental impacts and trigger new deforestation fronts, the study published in Environmental Research Letters finds.

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Asia’s fragile caves face growing development risks 18.12.2014 Guardian: Environment
The limestone caves of Southeast Asia and southwest China are home to scores of plants and animals, many of them rare. But a rise in tourism, mining, and other human activities is placing these biodiverse environments at risk, reports Environment360 Botanist Li-Bing Zhang has spent years collecting ferns in the caves and limestone formations of southwestern China and neighboring Southeast Asia. When I met him recently in a Vietnamese national park, his research vehicle, a silver van, was bursting with fern specimens. Zhang and two colleagues had found them in tropical forests and at the entrances of 10 caves. About 10 of the specimens, including a cave fern that his team had found in Phong Nha-Ke Bang National Park in central Vietnam, were probably unknown to science, Zhang said. He planned to test his hunches when he returned to his laboratory at the Missouri Botanical Garden, where he works as an associate curator. “The problem is that a lot of species go extinct unnoticed,” Zhang told me while ...
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8 Strange New Spider Species Found on Indian Tiger Reserve 1.12.2014 Wired Top Stories
Eight potentially new species of spiders have been found living in India’s Parambikulam Tiger Reserve, a park near the southwestern coast of the ...
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Wildlife Trusts calls for protection for UK's 17 marine megafauna hotspots 4.11.2014 Guardian: Environment

Basking sharks, harbour porpoises and white-beaked dolphins at risk from boat tours, windfarms and fishnets

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Hotspots in India's tiger-trading network revealed 26.9.2014 New Scientist: Sex and Cloning
The traders in tiger parts prefer to smuggle their illegal wares via the nation's railway routes, reveals data on 40 years of ...
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Sydneys waters could be tropical in decades, heres the bad news 16.9.2014 Guardian: Comment is Free
Our research points to a widespread tropicalisation of temperate coastlines such as Sydney within the next few decades. This may sound pleasant, but it might not be Welcome to tropical Sydney, where colourful surgeonfishes and parrotfishes are plentiful, corals have replaced kelp forests, and underwater life seems brighter, more colourful and all-round better. Or is it? While this vision of a future Sydney is just an embellished cartoon of what climate change would do off the citys coastline, our recent research does point to a widespread tropicalisation of temperate coastlines such as Sydney within the next few decades. This may sound pleasant, but it can lead to unwanted ...
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Economic success puts Himalayan languages at risk of extinction 3.9.2014 Hindustan Times: World
The Himalayan region is one of the global hotspots where local languages are at risk of extinction due to thriving economies and need immediate attention at conservation according to a new study by a team of international ...
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22,000 flock to Birdfair, the Glastonbury of birdwatching 17.8.2014 Guardian: Environment
The Rutland Water event shows how twitching has moved from anoraky pursuit of exotic species to mainstream passion Continue reading...
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Competition for ecological niches limits evolution of new species 14.8.2014 Guardian: Science
A recently published study finds that competition for ecological niches limits the evolution of new species. Further, this study finds that speciation rate slows or even stops as available ecological niches fill up. Continue reading...
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The Secret Bataclysm: White Nose Syndrome and Extinction 12.8.2014 Wired Top Stories
In just 8 years, bats have gone from the most common mammal in the US to endangered species candidates.
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South-west is the UK's jellyfish hotspot, survey finds 22.7.2014 Guardian: Environment

First effort to map populations in over 40 years shows moon jellyfish is most spotted species in UK waters

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Saving the Beeliar wetlands is vital: we can't have a highway destroy it | Lynn MacLaren 17.6.2014 Guardian: Comment is Free
The western Australian wetlands are home to threatened species but the government's plan for a highway would damage the ecosystem irreparably. There are better alternatives Today we can visit Beeliar wetlands and experience a taste of the stunning Western Australian wetlands that once extended along the Swan coastal plain. A rich tapestry of flora and fauna have made these wetlands their home but now face an uncertain future: successive governments have catastrophically failed to protect the native habitat which have earned Perths status as a biodiversity hotspot. Less than 20% of these wetlands remain today. If we do not act now to conserve and protect these precious places, there will be nothing left for future ...
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367 new species discovered in Mekong river in two years: WWF 5.6.2014 New Kerala: World News
Phnom Penh, June 5 : A giant flying squirrel, a skydiving gecko and an eyeless cave-dwelling spider are among the 367 new species that have been discovered in the Greater Mekong region in the past two years, the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) said Thursday.
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Ecuador signs permits for oil drilling in Amazon's Yasuni national park 23.5.2014 Guardian: Environment

Companies could start extracting oil underneath key biodiversity reserve on Earth by 2016

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New species added to invertebrates list after UAE discovery 12.5.2014 New Kerala: World News
Abu Dhabi, May 12 : A new species has been added to the global list of invertebrates after an unexpected discovery in the United Arab Emirates (UAE).
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'Indonesia's deforestation is a disaster for the planet' - audio slideshow 24.4.2014 The Guardian -- Front Page
Award-winning Hong Kong photographer and photojournalist Paul Hilton's latest series of images looks at the impact of deforestation on Indonesia's wildlife. Basing himself in one of the most biodiverse hotspots in the world - the Leuser ecosystem in Aceh, home to rhino, orangutan, tigers and elephants - Hilton found that the clearing of forests for palm oil plantations means more roads are being cut into habitat, with endangered species being killed or sold for the wildlife trade in roadside markets Continue reading...
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Chili pepper farming originated in Mexico 22.4.2014 New Kerala: World News
New York, April 22 : Farming of chili peppers, the most widely cultivated spice crop that have conquered cuisines around the world, was born in central-east Mexico, says a study.
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'Dinosaur-killing' asteroid helped establish reef fish community 65M years ago 4.4.2014 New Kerala: World News
Washington, April 3 : A new study has revealed that the asteroid that wiped out the dinosaur population 65 million years ago may have helped establish the modern reef fish communities.
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