User: irge304 Topic: Biodiversity
Category: Hotspots
Last updated: Jul 25 2015 12:52 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Dinosaur National Monument celebrates 100 years 25.7.2015 Steamboat Pilot
Come October, Dinosaur National Monument will celebrate its 100th birthday, and park staff as well as surrounding communities are coming together to highlight all of the features and attractions that make the monument an international tourist hotspot. President Woodrow Wilson declared the area a national park on Oct. 4, 1915 after paleontologist Earl Douglass discovered a large amount of fossils in a quarry in northeastern Utah. Douglass was exploring the area for fossils to send back to the Carnegie Museum of Natural History. After thousands of fossils were excavated and sent to the museum for study, Wilson set aside 80 acres to be considered National Park land. In 1938, President Franklin D. Roosevelt expanded the park to 210,000 acres in order to protect stretches of the Green River and the Yampa River. The monument spans across Colorado and Utah in the southeast portion of the Uinta Mountains, a subrange of the Rocky Mountains. The fossils date to the Jurassic period — the period most highly ...
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Walk on the wild side: saving California's mountain lions 16.7.2015 The Guardian -- Front Page
Santa Monica’s mountain lions are hemmed in on all sides by highways, the ocean and open fields – leading to road deaths and in-breeding. A lush overpass spanning 10 freeway lanes would allow them to roam freely and safely Bee highways and squirrel suspension bridges – in pictures Highways bring people and cities closer together. Where once dusty wagon trails inhibited access to goods and services from other parts of the country, the rise of the freeway (and the car) provided unprecedented mobility for people – but, it turns out, not for wildlife. In Los Angeles, the mountain lions of the Santa Monica mountains are trapped, hemmed in by busy oncoming traffic from the 101 freeway. “They’ll come right up to the freeway on both sides, turn around and leave. We know they’re not crossing,” says Jeff Sikich, a US National Park Service (NPS) ...
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Crushing ivory stockpiles destroys vital evidence of poaching 18.6.2015 New Scientist: Focus on America
Samples of confiscated illegal ivory should be taken before destroying stockpiles to allow forensic investigators to trace poaching and trafficking ...
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Punk rock sea slug spotted in Australia 5.6.2015 New Scientist: Opinion
Some look like punks, others like clowns. A seasonal census is uncovering a wide variety of sea slug species in a biodiversity ...
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Sri Lanka first nation to promise full protection of mangroves 12.5.2015 New Scientist: Opinion
A $3.4 million project will give local women loans and training in exchange for replanting and conserving mangrove ...
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Hundreds of millions of acres of world's forest could be lost by 2030, say WWF 28.4.2015 The Guardian -- World Latest

Conservationists identify 11 hotspots that could sustain 80% of protected global forest losses over the next two decades

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East Australia one of 11 areas to account for 80% of world forest loss by 2030 28.4.2015 The Guardian -- World Latest

Between 3m and 6m hectares of forest, mainly across New South Wales and Queensland, could be lost between 2010 and 2030

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Controversial mine threatens Indonesian dive mecca 3.4.2015 Guardian: Environment

Activists are taking legal action to try and stop mining on the tiny Indonesian island of Bangka, a hotspot of marine biodiversity in the Coral Triangle.

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Icy pools are oases for unique glacier ecosystems 13.3.2015 New Scientist: Opinion
Water bears, not polar bears, rule the glacial holes that are hotspots for invertebrates. But the very dust which helps the holes form may lead to their ...
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Plant genus named after Sir David Attenborough 4.2.2015 Guardian: Environment

Key taxonomical classification of rare plant with fleshy flowers discovered in the rainforest of Gabon in central Africa is named after British naturalist

Grasshoppers, shrimps, spiders and other creatures have all been named after Sir David Attenborough, but now a whole genus of endangered plants will bear the naturalist’s name.

Identified by a team of researchers in Gabon, a renowned botanical hotspot, the Sirdavidia flowering plants are believed to be the first plant genus – a taxonomical ranking one step above a species – named after the broadcaster.

Related: Species named after Sir David Attenborough - in pictures

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Roads are encroaching deeper into the Amazon rainforest, study says 28.1.2015 Guardian: Environment

Oil and gas access roads in western Amazon could open up ‘Pandora’s box’ of environmental impacts

Oil and gas roads are encroaching deeper into the western Amazon, one of the world’s last wildernesses and biodiversity hotspots, according to a new study.

Roads across Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and western Brazil could open up a ‘Pandora’s box’ of negative environmental impacts and trigger new deforestation fronts, the study published in Environmental Research Letters finds.

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Asia’s fragile caves face growing development risks 18.12.2014 Guardian: Environment
The limestone caves of Southeast Asia and southwest China are home to scores of plants and animals, many of them rare. But a rise in tourism, mining, and other human activities is placing these biodiverse environments at risk, reports Environment360 Botanist Li-Bing Zhang has spent years collecting ferns in the caves and limestone formations of southwestern China and neighboring Southeast Asia. When I met him recently in a Vietnamese national park, his research vehicle, a silver van, was bursting with fern specimens. Zhang and two colleagues had found them in tropical forests and at the entrances of 10 caves. About 10 of the specimens, including a cave fern that his team had found in Phong Nha-Ke Bang National Park in central Vietnam, were probably unknown to science, Zhang said. He planned to test his hunches when he returned to his laboratory at the Missouri Botanical Garden, where he works as an associate curator. “The problem is that a lot of species go extinct unnoticed,” Zhang told me while ...
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8 Strange New Spider Species Found on Indian Tiger Reserve 1.12.2014 Wired Top Stories
Eight potentially new species of spiders have been found living in India’s Parambikulam Tiger Reserve, a park near the southwestern coast of the ...
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Wildlife Trusts calls for protection for UK's 17 marine megafauna hotspots 4.11.2014 Guardian: Environment

Basking sharks, harbour porpoises and white-beaked dolphins at risk from boat tours, windfarms and fishnets

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Hotspots in India's tiger-trading network revealed 26.9.2014 New Scientist: Sex and Cloning
The traders in tiger parts prefer to smuggle their illegal wares via the nation's railway routes, reveals data on 40 years of ...
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Sydneys waters could be tropical in decades, heres the bad news 16.9.2014 Guardian: Comment is Free
Our research points to a widespread tropicalisation of temperate coastlines such as Sydney within the next few decades. This may sound pleasant, but it might not be Welcome to tropical Sydney, where colourful surgeonfishes and parrotfishes are plentiful, corals have replaced kelp forests, and underwater life seems brighter, more colourful and all-round better. Or is it? While this vision of a future Sydney is just an embellished cartoon of what climate change would do off the citys coastline, our recent research does point to a widespread tropicalisation of temperate coastlines such as Sydney within the next few decades. This may sound pleasant, but it can lead to unwanted ...
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Economic success puts Himalayan languages at risk of extinction 3.9.2014 Hindustan Times: World
The Himalayan region is one of the global hotspots where local languages are at risk of extinction due to thriving economies and need immediate attention at conservation according to a new study by a team of international ...
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22,000 flock to Birdfair, the Glastonbury of birdwatching 17.8.2014 Guardian: Environment
The Rutland Water event shows how twitching has moved from anoraky pursuit of exotic species to mainstream passion Continue reading...
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Competition for ecological niches limits evolution of new species 14.8.2014 Guardian: Science
A recently published study finds that competition for ecological niches limits the evolution of new species. Further, this study finds that speciation rate slows or even stops as available ecological niches fill up. Continue reading...
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The Secret Bataclysm: White Nose Syndrome and Extinction 12.8.2014 Wired Top Stories
In just 8 years, bats have gone from the most common mammal in the US to endangered species candidates.
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