User: irge304 Topic: Biodiversity
Category: Hotspots
Last updated: Apr 30 2016 13:18 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 216    
Britain's wild places are vital to our imaginations 30.4.2016 Guardian: Environment
The UK has hundreds of islands, hills and rivers and a coastline almost 20,000 miles long, inspiring a passion deep within us. Plus: top five wild hotspots Recently, I climbed Maol Chean-dearg, a mountain in the far north-west of Scotland. Down in the glens, it was not far above freezing, and the cold air pooled as mist. But up on the summits the sun blazed, and the temperature touched 15C. The result was one of the most dazzling cloud inversions I have seen in 30 years. In the high corries of the peak, I climbed out of the mist and into clearness. To the west, jagging from a glowing sea of cloud, were the Black Cuillin of Skye and the Clisham on the Outer Hebrides. Nearby were the graceful Torridon tops: Beinn Alligin, whose Gaelic name means the jewelled hill, and Liathach, the grey one. Far to the east rose the white domes of the Cairngorms. I had a sight-span of almost 200 miles, across mountain, glen, sea and loch. There was nowhere I would rather have been than ...
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LA, a surprise nature hotspot, is home to one of the biggest biodiversity studies 15.4.2016 Guardian: Environment

Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County is trying to collect and inventory all of the region’s urban wildlife, some of which hitched a ride to the metropolis

Los Angeles – synonymous with cars, concrete and urban sprawl – turns out to possess a secret, thriving underworld: nature.

A host of animal, mammal, reptile, spider and insect species has hitched a ride to the metropolis on planes and ships and flourished in the balmy climate alongside native species, helping to turn LA into one of the world’s most diverse ecosystems.

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Indonesia threatens to bar DiCaprio over rainforest comments 2.4.2016 AP Top News
JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) -- Hollywood actor Leonardo DiCaprio may be banned from returning to Indonesia over his criticisms that palm oil plantations are destroying the country's rainforests and endangering wildlife, an immigration official said Saturday....
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Indonesia slams Leonardo DiCaprio over rainforest advocacy 1.4.2016 New Kerala: World News
Bangkok, April 1 : Hollywood actor Leonardo DiCaprio has been slammed by the Indonesian government over his visit to the Gunung Leuser National Park in northern Sumatra, where he met with environmental activists and urged the public on social media to stand up against palm oil.
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10 of the best places to photograph wildlife in the UK 29.3.2016 Guardian: Environment

You don’t need to go on an African safari to take great wildlife photographs. Photographer Andrew Marshall, whose new photo-location guidebook gives advice on how to capture UK wildlife, selects 10 picture perfect spots

For more than 60 years Sir David Attenborough has travelled the world witnessing and sharing amazing wildlife spectacles, but he was first inspired nearer to home, by animals in the UK. From water voles plopping into streams to white-tailed sea eagles soaring over the Highlands, UK habitats support varied populations of birds, mammals, amphibians, fish and reptiles.

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These scientists studying coral reefs were brought to tears -- but in a good way 24.3.2016 LA Times: Science

As ocean warming continues to trigger widespread destruction of coral reefs, a decade-long study of remote islands in the Central Pacific suggests these biodiversity hot spots may thrive despite the threats posed by an increasingly hotter planet.

With many parts of the globe in the grip of a nearly...

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Ecuador creates Galápagos marine sanctuary to protect sharks 21.3.2016 The Guardian -- World Latest

Belgium-sized area around northern islands of Darwin and Wolf will be off-limits for fishing in bid to conserve sharks and unique habitat

Ecuador has created a new marine sanctuary in the Galápagos Islands that will offer protection to the world’s greatest concentration of sharks.

Some 15,000 square miles (38,000 sq km) of the waters around Darwin and Wolf - the most northern islands - will be made off limits to all fishing to conserve the sharks that congregate there and the ecosystem on which they rely.

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The plague still exists and it's here 30.12.2015 CNN: Top Stories
Scientists have created a predictive map that may help identify areas of the United States likely to see cases of plague in the near future.
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Back from the brink: Lemurs of Madagascar 27.8.2015 CNN: Top Stories
Madagascar is a biodiversity hotspot unlike any other.
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Deforestation serious threat to bats in India 20.8.2015 New Kerala: World News
London, Aug 20 : With increasing human population and rise in agricultural land use in India's Western Ghats, a number of bat species are findings it difficult to adjust with the changed landscape brought about by deforestation, says a new study.
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If you really love wildlife, forget about red squirrels | James Borrell 5.8.2015 The Guardian -- Front Page
We’ll get far greater biodiversity for our buck by investing in conservation in developing countries, rather than focusing on high-profile British projects The furore over Cecil the lion clearly demonstrates that the public are passionate about conserving wildlife – wherever it is. Yet conservation spending in richer nations is still trapped in a parochial “home first” mindset. Given most plants and animals, and particularly endangered species, are found in poorer countries where money goes further, why are we worrying about hedgehogs , red squirrels or wild boar ? Last year £571m of public-sector funding was spent on UK biodiversity. However only £60m was earmarked for international biodiversity, barely 10% of the total budget. From a global perspective, the UK contains only a tiny proportion of the world’s biodiversity. In terms of diversity of species, it ranks 89th in the world , and that’s despite the country’s wildlife being recorded far better than ...
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Dinosaur National Monument celebrates 100 years 25.7.2015 Steamboat Pilot
Come October, Dinosaur National Monument will celebrate its 100th birthday, and park staff as well as surrounding communities are coming together to highlight all of the features and attractions that make the monument an international tourist hotspot. President Woodrow Wilson declared the area a national park on Oct. 4, 1915 after paleontologist Earl Douglass discovered a large amount of fossils in a quarry in northeastern Utah. Douglass was exploring the area for fossils to send back to the Carnegie Museum of Natural History. After thousands of fossils were excavated and sent to the museum for study, Wilson set aside 80 acres to be considered National Park land. In 1938, President Franklin D. Roosevelt expanded the park to 210,000 acres in order to protect stretches of the Green River and the Yampa River. The monument spans across Colorado and Utah in the southeast portion of the Uinta Mountains, a subrange of the Rocky Mountains. The fossils date to the Jurassic period — the period most highly ...
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Walk on the wild side: saving California's mountain lions 16.7.2015 The Guardian -- Front Page
Santa Monica’s mountain lions are hemmed in on all sides by highways, the ocean and open fields – leading to road deaths and in-breeding. A lush overpass spanning 10 freeway lanes would allow them to roam freely and safely Bee highways and squirrel suspension bridges – in pictures Highways bring people and cities closer together. Where once dusty wagon trails inhibited access to goods and services from other parts of the country, the rise of the freeway (and the car) provided unprecedented mobility for people – but, it turns out, not for wildlife. In Los Angeles, the mountain lions of the Santa Monica mountains are trapped, hemmed in by busy oncoming traffic from the 101 freeway. “They’ll come right up to the freeway on both sides, turn around and leave. We know they’re not crossing,” says Jeff Sikich, a US National Park Service (NPS) ...
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Crushing ivory stockpiles destroys vital evidence of poaching 18.6.2015 New Scientist: Focus on America
Samples of confiscated illegal ivory should be taken before destroying stockpiles to allow forensic investigators to trace poaching and trafficking ...
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Punk rock sea slug spotted in Australia 5.6.2015 New Scientist: Opinion
Some look like punks, others like clowns. A seasonal census is uncovering a wide variety of sea slug species in a biodiversity ...
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Sri Lanka first nation to promise full protection of mangroves 12.5.2015 New Scientist: Opinion
A $3.4 million project will give local women loans and training in exchange for replanting and conserving mangrove ...
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Hundreds of millions of acres of world's forest could be lost by 2030, say WWF 28.4.2015 The Guardian -- World Latest

Conservationists identify 11 hotspots that could sustain 80% of protected global forest losses over the next two decades

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East Australia one of 11 areas to account for 80% of world forest loss by 2030 28.4.2015 The Guardian -- World Latest

Between 3m and 6m hectares of forest, mainly across New South Wales and Queensland, could be lost between 2010 and 2030

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Controversial mine threatens Indonesian dive mecca 3.4.2015 Guardian: Environment

Activists are taking legal action to try and stop mining on the tiny Indonesian island of Bangka, a hotspot of marine biodiversity in the Coral Triangle.

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Icy pools are oases for unique glacier ecosystems 13.3.2015 New Scientist: Opinion
Water bears, not polar bears, rule the glacial holes that are hotspots for invertebrates. But the very dust which helps the holes form may lead to their ...
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