User: irge304 Topic: Biodiversity
Category: Hotspots
Last updated: Apr 24 2014 16:50 IST RSS 2.0
 
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'Indonesia's deforestation is a disaster for the planet' - audio slideshow 24.4.2014 The Guardian -- Front Page
Award-winning Hong Kong photographer and photojournalist Paul Hilton's latest series of images looks at the impact of deforestation on Indonesia's wildlife. Basing himself in one of the most biodiverse hotspots in the world - the Leuser ecosystem in Aceh, home to rhino, orangutan, tigers and elephants - Hilton found that the clearing of forests for palm oil plantations means more roads are being cut into habitat, with endangered species being killed or sold for the wildlife trade in roadside markets Continue reading...
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Chili pepper farming originated in Mexico (Cached) 22.4.2014 New Kerala: World News
New York, April 22 : Farming of chili peppers, the most widely cultivated spice crop that have conquered cuisines around the world, was born in central-east Mexico, says a study.
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'Dinosaur-killing' asteroid helped establish reef fish community 65M years ago (Cached) 4.4.2014 New Kerala: World News
Washington, April 3 : A new study has revealed that the asteroid that wiped out the dinosaur population 65 million years ago may have helped establish the modern reef fish communities.
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$10m plan to save world's rarest gorilla 21.3.2014 Guardian: Environment

Five-year conservation project could revive the population of Cross River gorilla in their only remaining habitat in Africa

The world’s rarest gorilla, which is believed to be down to less than 300 remaining individuals, can be saved with a $10.5m action plan, conservationists say.

The Cross River gorilla (Gorilla gorilla diehli) lives in a hilly rainforest area around 12,000 sq km in size along the Nigeria-Cameroon border, regarded as a globally significant “biodiversity hotspot.” It is the rarest of four gorilla sub-species and is listed as critically endangered.

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Amazon trees 'live fast, die young' 4.3.2014 BBC: Science
A "live fast, die young" life history strategy could have played a key role leading to the high tree diversity in the Amazon, scientists suggest.
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Farmland butterflies bounce back 19.2.2014 BBC News - Science & Environment
The UK's farmland butterflies have flourished thanks to last year's hot summer, according to the charity Butterfly Conservation.
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Moving remnants of a home shattered by Japan's tsunami 4.2.2014 New Scientist: Living World
Moving remnants of a home shattered by Japan's tsunami
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Plant killer boost for rainforests 23.1.2014 BBC News - Science & Environment
Pathogenic fungi, normally associated with killing plant life, could play a key role in driving biodiversity in tropical rainforests, a study suggests.
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Majority of big beasts in decline 10.1.2014 BBC: Front Page
Lions, wolves, bears and other big meat-eating animals are rapidly declining around the world say scientists.
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Vanishing large carnivores threaten ecosystems (Cached) 9.1.2014 New Kerala: World News
New York, Jan 9 : In ecosystems around the world, the decline of large predators such as lions, wolves, otters and bears is changing the face of landscapes.
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Tags reveal turtle by-catch hotspots 8.1.2014 BBC News - Science & Environment
Satellite data reveals by-catch hotspots for endangered species
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The Best Scientific Visualizations of 2013 25.12.2013 Wired Top Stories
The Best Scientific Visualizations of 2013
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'Big Five' animals help plan conservation better (Cached) 25.12.2013 New Kerala: World News
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Tracking the Secret Lives of Great White Sharks 19.12.2013 Wired Top Stories
Tracking the Secret Lives of Great White Sharks
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Preserving nature's lost kingdom 28.11.2013 BBC: World
Why Burma's unexplored forests 'must be preserved'
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Colombia's misty mountain world's most irreplacable nature reserve 15.11.2013 Guardian: Environment
Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta named the most important concentration of threatened wildlife on Earth in top 10 habitat list A misty mountain in Colombia, once beleaguered by the cocaine trade, is the world's most irreplaceable nature reserve, according to a landmark analysis of every protected area on the planet. The spectacular creatures that shelter in the cloud forest of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta national park , including the critically endangered harlequin frog and the vivid Santa Marta parakeet, are the most important concentration of threatened mammals, birds and amphibians on Earth. Their habitat has been savaged by drug crops and then by the herbicide the government sprayed from the air to kill them, but it now faces a new threat. "This beautiful mountain, which is not far from cities and towns, is being colonised by rich people building second homes," said Dr Ana Rodrigues, a researcher at the CEFE-CNRS institute in France, who led the new study. The team's analysis of the ...
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Family planning in Madagascar: lessons from a conservation NGO 12.11.2013 The Guardian -- World Latest
Blue Ventures has increased access to contraception from 10% in 2007 to 55% today. What can the global health community learn? The national contraception use rate in Madagascar is 29%. Yet in Velondriake, a remote area in the southwest of the country, it is 55%. Just 10% of the community had access in 2007 when the marine conservation organisation Blue Ventures launched Safidy , its family planning programme. So how did it do it? Safidy, which means "choice" in Malagasy, was born out of a desire to help the communities Blue Ventures was working with. The area had virtually no health infrastructure and a focus group revealed a huge need for family planning. Agathe Lawson, the United Nations Population Fund representative in Madagascar, who supports Blue Ventures and a number of other family planning initiatives in the country, says that asking the community for what it wanted was instrumental to Safidy's success. "Sometimes we can pre-empt what people want but qualitative research is ...
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Gold rush sparked by global financial crisis devastates Amazon 30.10.2013 MSNBC
Gold rush sparked by global financial crisis devastates Amazon
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Amazonia 'ruled' by 227 tree species 18.10.2013 BBC News - Science & Environment
Despite being home to about 16,000 tree species, just 227 "hyperdominant" species account for half of Amazonia's total trees, a study suggests.
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Study: Extreme heat to be the norm 10.10.2013 CNN: Top Stories
Annual average temperatures will consistently exceed historic high temperatures in as little as seven years in tropical hotspots and could leave the current global temperature range in the dust within four decades if nothing is done to stop climate change, according to a new study published Thursday in the journal Nature.
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