User: irge304 Topic: Biodiversity
Category: Biodiversity
Last updated: May 26 2017 07:46 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Butterflies at Chatfield Farms hopes to enchant visitors with the state’s native pollinators 26.5.2017 Denver Post: Lifestyles
The butterfly house, a partnership between the Butterfly Pavilion and Denver Botanic Gardens, intends to draw people inside its warm habitat with the sell of beautiful insects surrounded by flowers. But once inside, the organizations hope Coloradans will become more attached to their native pollinators, which have seen populations plummet, and leave wanting to help.
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Will address environment issues in ‘scientific manner’: Harsh Vardhan 23.5.2017 Chicago Tribune: Nation
NEW DELHI: Best efforts would be made to address all environmental issues, including “contentious” ones, in a “meticulous and scientific” manner, Union minister Harsh Vardhan said today after taking charge as environment minister following the death of Anil Madhav Dave last week. Noting that air and water pollution were a “matter of concern” for the ...
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In 2016, scientists discovered 18,000 new species. Now meet the Top 10 22.5.2017 LA Times: Science
ESF announced its annual Top 10 list of new species for 2017.
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How to lure the bees, butterflies and other pollinators to your Colorado garden 19.5.2017 Denver Post: Lifestyles
Pollinator habitats aren’t built in a day. But you can make some real headway in a gardening season and continue to add to your vision as the years go on.
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Tillerson says US won't be rushed on climate change policies 12.5.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
BC-US--Arctic Council, 4th Ld-Writethru,637 Tillerson says US won’t be rushed on climate change policies AP Photo RPMT120, RPMT102, RPMT116, RPMT112, RPMT107, RPMT113, RPMT115, RPMT119, RPMT122, RPMT123, RPMT114, RPMT106, RPMT108, RPMT109, RPMT105, RPMT117 Eds: Updates throughout. AP Photos. AP Video. By MARK THIESSEN Associated Press FAIRBANKS, Alaska • Arctic nations have renewed calls for the world to address climate warming, but U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson says the United States wi...
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Tillerson says US won't be rushed on climate change policies 12.5.2017 AP National
FAIRBANKS, Alaska (AP) -- Arctic nations have renewed calls for the world to address climate warming, but U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson says the United States will not rush to make a decision on its policies....
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Dinosaur named for 'Ghostbusters' creature found in Montana 75 million years after its death 10.5.2017 LA Times: Commentary
A remarkably complete, 75-million year old dinosaur skeleton from Montana is recognized as a new genus and species of armored ankylosaurian dinosaur. It's named after Zuul from "Ghostbusters."
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Denver Zoo’s nursery gets another addition: Meet endangered Malayan tapir calf Umi 9.5.2017 Denver Post: News: Local
Denver Zoo's endangered Malayan tapir (TAY-purr) pair Rinny and Benny welcomed their third calf -- and first girl -- early Saturday. Umi, whose name means life in Malayan, will stay behind the scenes at the zoo's Toyota Elephant passage habitat until she's able to swim and both mom and baby are comfortable enough to venture outdoors, said Sean Anderson-Vie, zoo public relations manager.
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In a rare sighting, wildlife photographer gets to snap Leucistic spotted deer 8.5.2017 Hindu: News
Says it may be the first sighting in the country of partial pigmented spotted deer
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Eric K. Ganshert: Colorado does need wolves 4.5.2017 Steamboat Pilot
Contrary to Mr. Bowers’ beliefs (stated in a letter to the editor in the May 4 issue of Steamboat Today), Colorado needs wolves. I encourage him to learn of the historic ranges of the Western Grey Wolf species. "Predatory Bureaucracy: The Extermination of Wolves and the Transformation of the West" by Michael Robinson is a good starting point. Additionally, interested parties should learn about “anthropogenic trophic downgrading” and the downstream impacts, known as “trophic cascades.” These impacts resonate from waterway health to the overall biodiversity of ecosystems and have been documented by dozens of studies published in peer-reviewed journals. William J. Ripple and Robert L. Beschta are PhD ecologists who have produced thorough literature on the subject. If Mr. Bowers’ concerns are for that of the hunting/livestock industry, I challenge him to produce data that proves wolves make a significant impact. According to the USDA’s 2011 cattle death report, predator kills of cattle amounted to a ...
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Suit aims to block fracking plan for National Forest in Ohio 2.5.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A coalition of conservation groups has filed a lawsuit aimed at blocking plans to allow fracking in eastern Ohio’s Wayne National Forest. The Sierra Club, Ohio Environmental Council and the Center for Biological Diversity filed the lawsuit Tuesday in U.S District Court in Columbus. The lawsuit against the Bureau of Land […]
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Controversial Colorado Parks & Wildlife plan to remove mountain lions, bears west of Rifle begins 2.5.2017 Steamboat Pilot
Despite a lawsuit attempting to stand in the way, a controversial Colorado Parks and Wildlife predator control plan targeting mountain lions and black bears in the Piceance Basin of Northwest Colorado began Monday. According to the Glenwood Springs Post Independent , Mike Porras, CPW’s northwest region public information officer, said the Piceance Basin portion of this program will run through June, seeking to remove five to 10 mountain lions and 10 to 20 bears. The agency’s plan, however, could call for more predators to be killed — up to 15 lions and 25 bears. WildEarth Guardians and the Center for Biological Diversity are suing CPW in an attempt to halt the program. “CPW’s plans are not grounded in sound science, violate Colorado’s Constitution and are neither supported by the vast majority of Coloradoans nor in the public interest,” said Stuart Wilcox, WildEarth Guardians’ staff attorney. “The Parks and Wildlife Commission’s disdain for the public’s will and the opinions of dozens of our country’s ...
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Why Mexican Chefs, Farmers And Activists Are Reviving The Ancient Grain Amaranth 2.5.2017 NPR News
The nutritious indigenous plant is part of a movement to revive native crops and cuisines — and a means of restoring the health and economy of Oaxaca, one of Mexico's poorest states.
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Seattle’s Brenda Peterson tackles restoration in ‘Wolf Nation’ 30.4.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

Brenda Peterson calls her book “a narrative of restoration science” in which “generational prejudice [is] yielding to new ways of living with wild wolves.”
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How A Wild Berry Is Helping To Protect China's Giant Pandas And Its Countryside 26.4.2017 NPR News
Long before it became a "superfood" in the U.S., schisandra was made into soups and jams and prized as a medicinal plant. Now the berry is at the center of a dramatic new approach to conservation.
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If There's Going to Be a Wall, Let It Be This Collaboration Between American and Mexican Designers 21.4.2017 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by Fusion and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. When President Trump appealed to the public to submit proposals for his "big, beautiful" border wall, you can be pretty sure that the plan presented by the Mexican American Design and Engineering Collective (MADE) was not what he had in mind. In response to the president's mad quest to build a wall along the US-Mexico border, the group of 14 designers, engineers, builders, and architects from the US and Mexico proposed something entirely different—a high-tech "ecotopia" called Otra Nation. "Otra Nation will be the world's first shared co-nation open to citizens of both countries and co-maintained by Mexico and the United States of America," the group says in their proposal . "Besides sharing the same geographical conditions, the continuous exchange of information, knowledge, artistic expression and migration between sides will produce fertile ground to bring forth a hybrid sense of ...
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Pesticide maker Dow Chemical tries to kill risk study 21.4.2017 SFGate: Business & Technology
WASHINGTON — Dow Chemical is pushing a Trump administration that’s open to scrapping regulations to ignore the findings of federal scientists who point to a family of widely used pesticides as harmful to about 1,800 critically threatened or endangered species. Lawyers representing Dow, whose CEO is a close adviser to President Trump, and two other manufacturers of organophosphates sent letters last week to the heads of three of Trump’s Cabinet agencies. EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt announced last month that he would reverse an Obama-era effort to bar the use of Dow’s chlorpyrifos pesticide on food after recent peer-reviewed studies found that even tiny levels of exposure could hinder the development of children’s brains. For four years, federal scientists have compiled an official record, running more than 10,000 pages, indicating that the three pesticides under review — chlorpyrifos, diazinon and malathion — pose a risk to nearly every endangered species they studied. Regulators at the three ...
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Antarctica's biodiversity 'falling between the cracks' 20.4.2017 New Kerala: Technology
Antarctica's biodiversity 'falling between the cracks'
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Dow Chemical is pushing Trump administration to ignore studies of toxic pesticide 20.4.2017 LA Times: Business

Dow Chemical is pushing the Trump administration to scrap the findings of federal scientists who point to a family of widely used pesticides as harmful to about 1,800 critically threatened or endangered species.

Lawyers representing Dow — whose chief executive also heads a White House manufacturing...

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Dow Chemical tries to kill pesticide-risk study 20.4.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Washington • Dow Chemical is pushing a Trump administration open to scrapping regulations to ignore the findings of federal scientists who point to a family of widely used pesticides as harmful to about 1,800 critically threatened or endangered species. Lawyers representing Dow, whose CEO is a close adviser to Trump, and two other manufacturers of organophosphates sent letters last week to the heads of three of Trump’s Cabinet agencies. The companies asked them “to set aside” the results of gove... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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