User: indiatogether Topic: Environment
Category: Biodiversity :: Endangered Species
Last updated: Jan 18 2018 10:54 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Second giant panda baby born in Malaysia 18.1.2018 Zee News : Science and Technology
Xing Xing and Liang Liang, known in China as Feng Yi and Fu Wa, were sent to Malaysia in 2014 to mark the 40th anniversary of bilateral diplomatic relations.
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Snake rescued from Assembly premises 18.1.2018 Hindu: News
Black-headed royal snakes are non-venomous species
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Second giant panda baby born in Malaysia 17.1.2018 All News-IANS Stories
A female giant panda in a zoo here has given birth to a second cub, zoo officials said on Wednesday.
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Critically Endangered Sumatran Elephant Gives Birth In Indonesia 17.1.2018 NDTV News - Latest
A critically endangered Sumatran elephant has given birth to a new calf in Indonesia, the country's conservation agency said Wednesday.
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Critically endangered Sumatran elephant gives birth in 17.1.2018 General News
A critically endangered Sumatran elephant has given birth to a new calf in Indonesia, the country's conservation agency said today. Sumatran elephants are a protected species, but rampant deforestation for plantations has reduced their natural habitat and brought them into conflict with humans. The newborn was found with its 40-year old mother Seruni, who was being closely monitored by the agency in anticipation of the birth inside a conservation forest in Riau on the island of Sumatra. Officials expressed jubilation at the arrival of the baby who is believed to be a week old. Its gender has not yet been determined. "The birth of the elephant is a conservation gift," the agency said in a statement. "The calf is constantly being guarded by its mother and two other adult elephants." Dozens of elephants were found dead in Sumatra last year, including an adult without tusks in Aceh, along with its abandoned 11-month-old calf. Most were killed by humans, according to ...
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No-fishing zones may help endangered penguins 17.1.2018 General News
A recent study suggests that small no-fishing zones around colonies of penguins can help in conserving the struggling species.Researchers from the Universities of Exeter and Cape Town tested bans on catching "forage fish" such as sardines and anchovies - key prey for the endangered penguins - from 20km around their breeding islands.The body condition and survival of chicks improved when the no-fishing zones were in place.Study author Dr. Richard Sherley from the University of Exeter's Penryn Campus in Cornwall said, "The amount of forage fish caught worldwide is increasing and - although the effects are disputed - the impact on marine ecosystems could be severe".Forage fish are a key link in the food chain as they eat plankton and are preyed on by numerous species including tuna, dolphins, whales and penguins."We need to do more to understand the circumstances in which small no-fishing zones will improve the food available to predators, but our research shows this is a promising way ..
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Fight for survival 17.1.2018 FrontLine: Wildlife
The Indonesian island of Sulawesi offers a rich bonanza of endemic, exotic and endangered wildlife, mainly macaques and birds, whose conservation has become crucial because of habitat destruction. Text by G. SHAHEED and photographs by SHEFIQUE BASHEER AHAMMED
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Mumbai Gets a Flamingo Sanctuary as Trade-Off for Trans-Harbour Sea-Link 16.1.2018 The Wire

When a new highway had to cut through mudflats where flamingos come in, the quid pro quo by the Maharashtra government was to notify a flamingo sanctuary.

The post Mumbai Gets a Flamingo Sanctuary as Trade-Off for Trans-Harbour Sea-Link appeared first on The Wire.

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150 kg of sea cucumber seized in Ramanathapuram dist, 2 held 16.1.2018 General News
Sea cucumber weighing around 150 kg and worth about Rs 25 lakh, meant to be smuggled to Sri Lanka, was seized from Erwadi, about 70 kms from here and two persons arrested in this connection, marine police said. A boat used to smuggle the sea cucumber had also been seized, they said. Investigation is on. Sea cucumbers, classified as endangered species and their harvest banned under the Wildlife Protection Act, are in demand in South-East Asian countries.
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Nature Bytes 16.1.2018 Deccan Herald - Supplements
More isnt always better Sumatran tigers cant seem to catch a break. A new study containing good news about the population of this endangered cat also carried a disclaimer that there was probably no cause for optimism. The study, published in Nature Communications, relied on images from more than 300 trap cameras as well as data from decades of similar studies. The authors reported that tiger density in Sumatras three largest protected forests increased 5% per year from 1996 to 2014, suggesting that Indonesias preservation efforts are slowly working. However, the increase was probably caused by an influx of tigers fleeing unprotected forests on the large western island in the Indonesian archipelago, where their numbers are dropping rapidly, the researchers said. That means small gains in the protected areas are probably dwarfed by the species overall decline. "Densities have increased, but that has not reduced the threat of extinction because the habitat is being cut down and fragmented," said Matthew ...
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Maguri Motapung Beel declared no-picnic zone 16.1.2018 The Assam Tribune
Maguri Motapung Beel declared no-picnic zone
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As forests, wildlife and tribals exist in uneasy equilibrium, could lions be prey to sixth mass extinction? 15.1.2018 Latest News India on Firstpost
We are in the middle of the sixth great mass extinction in Earth's history. To put this in perspective, Earth lost the dinosaurs in the last great mass extinction event, 65 million years ago - so this is kind of a big deal | #FirstCulture
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New moth species discovered in Arunachal 15.1.2018 The Assam Tribune
New moth species discovered in Arunachal
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Experts suggest unconventional ways to reduce man-animal 14.1.2018 General News
Re-creating a fear barrier, one- shot contraception and keeping dead animals on jungle tracts for wild carnivores are some of the unconventional measures conservationists and wildlife experts suggest to reduce man- animal conflict. Belinda Wright, executive director of Wildlife Protection Society of India, said conflicts between humans and animals are inevitable, but their level has increased of late mainly due to increasing human encroachments on wildlife habitat. "If the government is serious about protecting India's wildlife, it must stop allowing the continued destruction and divergence of forest lands. This is the root cause behind the conflict," she said. "Forest corridors linking protected areas must be maintained where they exist, or created where they don't. Other measures such as swift delivery of compensation for livestock loss, property damage, or life lost due to conflict are important, but they are not long-term solutions," Wright told PTI. Thailand-based .
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New moth species discovered in Arunachal Pradesh 14.1.2018 General News
Researchers have discovered a new species of moth from the Talle Wildlife Sanctuary in Arunachal Pradesh. The discovery of the Zygaenid moth was published in the Journal of Threatened Taxa, an international journal on conservation and taxonomy, on December 26 last year. The article was published by Bombay Natural History Society scientist Monsoon Jyoti Gogoi and renowned lepidoptera (study of butterflies and moths) expert J J Young, and state education department employee Punyo Chada. "During a field trip to Talle Wildlife Sanctuary we colleted a torn, deformed moth found to be an undescribed female Elcysma, at an elevation of 1,700m in Ziro. This discovery represents the first record of Elcysma from Arunachal Pradesh," the researchers said. They suggested that the new species, scientifically named Elcysma Ziroensis, be commonly called Apatani Glory, named after a local tribe called Apatani. This species has only been seen during autumn, notably in the month of ...
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The selfie monkey 13.1.2018 FrontLine: Home
THE British wildlife photographer David J. Slater was taking pictures of black crested macaques at the Tangkoko Batuangus Dua Saudara Nature Reserve in 2011 when the macaques began to check out his...
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State lacks inclusive list of flora, fauna: EPTRI 13.1.2018 Hindu: Hyderabad
Report also blames State’s fossil fuel-based economy for climate change
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Pesticides threatened salmon, whales: study 13.1.2018 Hindu: S & T
They can impair the growth, swimming ability and reproductive systems of fish
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Why world's largest flying bird is on verge of extinction in India 13.1.2018 News
The world's largest flying bird is likely to be the first in the sub-continent to slide into extinction in the 21st century. Ironically, the biggest threat to its survival comes from renewable energy
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Two cubs born in Nandankanan zoo, tiger count increases to 26 13.1.2018 General News
The tiger population at the Nandankanan zoo here increased from 24 to 26 after a white tigress gave birth to two cubs in captivity, a zoo official said today. Ankita, the white tigress, gave birth to two normal- coloured cubs in an enclosure of the Nandankanan Zoological Park here last night, the official said, adding that today happened to be Ankita's birthday. The tigress delivered the first cub at 10.12 pm and the second one at 10.40 pm. The entire process was monitored through CCTV cameras, the official said. Ankita had mated with Saif, a normal-coloured, zoo-bred tiger. Saif was brought here from the Hyderabad zoo last year. Ankita was born in the Nandankanan zoo in 2012. Of the 26 tigers in the zoo, eight were white (a pigmentation variant of the Bengal tiger), the official said.
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