User: indiatogether Topic: Environment
Category: Biodiversity :: Species Loss
Last updated: Apr 24 2018 15:36 IST RSS 2.0
 
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“Achieving Land Degradation Neutrality by 2030 A Critical Need”:  Dr. Harsh Vardhan 24.4.2018 Govt of india: PIB
Emphasising the importance of land as a resource and the need to protect and harness its resources in a manner that does not adversely affect its health, Union Minister for Environment, Forest and Climate Change, Dr. Harsh Vardhan has underlined the critical need to achieve Land Degradation Neutrality (LDN) by 2030.
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Cleaner Cooking Fuel for 300 Million by 2021 - Randeep Agarwal 23.4.2018 General News
Globally, there are approximately 1.4 billion people without access to electricity and 2.7 billion people who rely on solid fuel (wood, crop residue, dung and coal) for cooking. The use of these traditional cooking fuels creates several significant problems, including deforestation, with a resultant loss of biodiversity and the elimination of carbon sinks which could offset global warming. There are also an estimated 4 million attributed deaths annually due to the negative health effects associated with indoor air pollution. Approximately 30 percent of those who cooked with solid fuels (820 million people) resided in India alone.The use of solid cooking fuels creates several significant problems. In 2012, resultant indoor air pollution was the cause of more than 4.3 million premature deaths, more than 60 percent of which were women and children. In many parts of the world, women are responsible for the collection of firewood and are specifically impacted by this burden.There is ample .
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Cleaner Cooking Fuel for 300 Million by 2021 - Randeep Agarwal 23.4.2018 Sify Finance
[India], Apr 23 (NewsVoir): Globally, there are approximately 1.4 billion people without access to electricity and 2.7 billion people who rely on solid fuel (wood, crop residue, dung and coal) for
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Mekong River dolphin population increases for first time 23.4.2018 All News-IANS Stories
The population of dolphins in Cambodia's Mekong river has increased for the first time after years of constant decline that has pushed the threatened species to the brink of extinction, activists said on Monday.
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The mysterious world of Dr Strange 23.4.2018 Hindu: Life & Style
Read on to discover more about the 5:2 guy Dr Michael Mosley
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Primacy to tourism affecting tiger habitats: Centre to Rajasthan govt 22.4.2018 General News
Citing cases of disappearance of tigers in Rajasthan, the Centre has alleged that tourism has assumed primacy in the state over basic ecological tenets resulting in dispersal of the big cats. Further, in spite of capacity building of frontline forest personnel, monitoring was not up to the mark and periodically tigers were reported missing, it said. "Even today, it has been reported that tiger ST-5 is missing and ST-11 was reported dead in spite of intensive monitoring," Union Environment, Forest and Climate Change Minister Harsh Vardhan said in a recent letter to Rajasthan Chief Minister Vasundhara Raje. In the letter, he said a two-phased project titled monitoring of re-introduced tigers in the Sariska Tiger Reserve was instituted in joint collaboration with the National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA), the Wildlife Institute of india (WII) and the state of Rajasthan. The project was designed with the overreaching objective of monitoring re-introduced tigers and in process ...
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Cow may be the biggest mammal in 200 years if humans keep up extinctions, reveals a study 20.4.2018 DNA: Top News
The domestic cow may be the largest land mammal on Earth in 200 years, if the loss of large-bodied and currently threatened animals continues in the future, according to a study. Researchers led by The University of New Mexico in the US demonstrated that mammal biodiversity loss, a major conservation concern today, is part of a long-term trend lasting at least 125,000 years. As archaic humans, Neanderthals and other hominin species migrated out of Africa, what followed was a wave of size-biased extinction in mammals on all continents that intensified over time, they said. The study, published in the journal Science, is the first to quantitatively show that human effects on mammal body size predates their migration out of Africa and that size selective extinction is a hallmark of human activities and not the norm in mammal evolution. The researchers showed that body-size downgrading - the loss of the largest species on each continent over time - is a hallmark of human activity, both in the past and ...
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Cow may be biggest mammal if humans keep up extinctions: study 20.4.2018 General News
The domestic cow may be the largest land mammal on Earth in 200 years, if the loss of large-bodied and currently threatened animals continues in the future, according to a study. Researchers led by The University of New Mexico in the US demonstrated that mammal biodiversity loss, a major conservation concern today, is part of a long-term trend lasting at least 125,000 years. As archaic humans, Neanderthals and other hominin species migrated out of Africa, what followed was a wave of size-biased extinction in mammals on all continents that intensified over time, they said. The study, published in the journal Science, is the first to quantitatively show that human effects on mammal body size predates their migration out of Africa and that size selective extinction is a hallmark of human activities and not the norm in mammal evolution. The researchers showed that body-size downgrading - the loss of the largest species on each continent over time - is a hallmark of human activity, both in
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Years From Now, Largest Mammal On Earth May Be A Domestic Cow: Study 20.4.2018 NDTV News - Top-stories
The spread of humans around the world from Africa thousands of years ago wiped out big mammals in a shrinking trend that could make the cow the biggest mammal on Earth in a few centuries' time, a...
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Cow may be biggest mammal if humans keep up extinctions: Study 20.4.2018 Zee News : Science and Technology
The spread of humans around the world from Africa thousands of years ago wiped out big mammals in a shrinking trend that could make the cow the biggest mammal on Earth in a few centuries` time, a scientific study said on Thursday.
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India is paying a price for losing its grasslands (Environment Feature) 20.4.2018 All News-IANS Stories
Wiry shrubs and clumps of brown-green fill the semi-arid landscape of Kutch in western India. Many of these patches have, over the years, made way for "more productive" agricultural land. This greening of "wasteland" is, however, degrading a precious and largely ignored ecosystem -- the grasslands. And, as a result, some species of animals that depend on grasslands are being pushed to the brink of extinction.
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Humble cow to be largest remaining mammal in 200 years: Study 20.4.2018 All News-IANS Stories
The pace at which humans have been hunting down large mammals into extinction since the early ages, the largest remaining mammal in 200 years would be the domestic cow, warn researchers.
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‘Kaziranga artificial flood shelters affecting park’s ecology’ 19.4.2018 The Assam Tribune
‘Kaziranga artificial flood shelters affecting park’s ecology’
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Researchers identify new species of ancient whale 18.4.2018 DNA: India
Researchers have identified a previously unknown genus and species of baleen whale in New Zealand, which dates back to more than 27.5 million years. Baleen whales are a group of Mysticeti, large whales usually from colder waters that lack teeth but have baleen plates in the upper jaw which are used to filter food such as krill out of large quantities of seawater. "This is a pretty old whale that goes almost half-way back to the age of the dinosaurs. We are tracking whale history back through time," said Ewan Fordyce, a professor at the University of Otago in New Zealand. The new species of extinct baleen whale is based on a skull and associated bones unearthed from the Kokoamu Greensand, a noted fossil-bearing rock unit in the South Canterbury and Waitaki district from the Oligocene period. At this time, New Zealand was an archipelago surrounded by shallow, richly productive seas. "This newly-named whale lived about 27.5 million years ago. It is about as old a common ancestor as we have for the living ...
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New species of ancient whale identified 18.4.2018 General News
Researchers have identified a previously unknown genus and species of baleen whale in New Zealand, which dates back to more than 27.5 million years. Baleen whales are a group of Mysticeti, large whales usually from colder waters that lack teeth but have baleen plates in the upper jaw which are used to filter food such as krill out of large quantities of seawater. "This is a pretty old whale that goes almost half-way back to the age of the dinosaurs. We are tracking whale history back through time," said Ewan Fordyce, a professor at the University of Otago in New Zealand. The new species of extinct baleen whale is based on a skull and associated bones unearthed from the Kokoamu Greensand, a noted fossil-bearing rock unit in the South Canterbury and Waitaki district from the Oligocene period. At this time, New Zealand was an archipelago surrounded by shallow, richly productive seas. "This newly-named whale lived about 27.5 million years ago. It is about as old a common ancestor as we ...
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Can diabetes affect muscle health? 18.4.2018 General News
Even active youngsters with Type 1 diabetes can have muscle complications, finds a study.The research team from McMaster and York universities analysed muscle biopsies of young adults with and without Type 1 diabetes who exceed Diabetes Canada's recommended weekly levels for physical activity.The researchers found structural and functional changes in the power generation parts of the cell, or mitochondria, of those with diabetes. Not only were the mitochondria less capable of producing energy for the muscle, they were also releasing high amounts of toxic reactive oxygen species, related to cell damage.These changes could result in reduced metabolism, greater difficulty controlling blood glucose and, if left unchecked, an accelerated rate of developing a disability. The study findings add poor muscle health to the list of better-known complications of Type 1 diabetes, including nerve damage, heart disease and kidney disorders."Now we know that even active people with diabetes have ...
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NCBS researcher has a go at the paradox of the plankton 14.4.2018 Hindu: Internet
In their model, the waste secreted by one species becomes food for another
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Wolf Call: Why this endangered species howls less 14.4.2018 Rediff: News
Studying wolves' howls could reveal how human language evolved.
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Australia's 'punk turtle' risks being last of the Mohicans 13.4.2018 Zee News : Science and Technology
Australia`s Mary River Turtle - with its green Mohican-style hair and ability to breathe through its genitals - is one of the world`s most distinctive reptiles.
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Australia's ''Punk Turtle'' Risks Being Last Of The Mohicans 13.4.2018 NDTV News - Top-stories
Australia's Mary River Turtle - with its green Mohican-style hair and ability to breathe through its genitals - is one of the world's most distinctive reptiles.
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