User: indiatogether Topic: Environment
Category: Biodiversity :: Species Loss
Last updated: Nov 18 2017 15:37 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Delay in the protection of corridors threatens tiger population 18.11.2017 Hindu: Science
It is not just poaching or habitat loss that threatens India’s tiger population. Delayed action to protect crucial wildlife corridors — despite the availability of relevant ecological knowledge — is ...
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Indian scientists among signatories to second warning to humanity by scientific experts from 184 countries 16.11.2017 Hindu: National
More than 120 Indian scientists are among the 15,364 scientists from 184 countries to endorse the second warning that the world's scientists have issued to humanity: not mending currently unsustainabl...
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Insurance coverage under-utilised in fisheries sector: CMFRI study 13.11.2017 HBL: Agri-biz
Shedding light on the alarming situation prevailing in the country’s fisheries sector, a study by the Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute (CMFRI) reveals that insurance remains under-utilised...
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Insurance in fisheries sector under-utilised: CMFRI study 13.11.2017 BusinessLine - Agri Business
Throwing light into the alarming situation prevailing in the country’s fisheries sector, a study by Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute (CMFRI) has revealed that insurance in this sector is u...
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How poor sleep effects your brain 13.11.2017 New Kerala: World News
How poor sleep effects your brain
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Dinosaurs could've survived if the killer asteroid had landed anywhere else 13.11.2017 All Beyond Business Stories
All species inevitably go extinct and the history of life on Earth is one of constant turnover
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Insurance in fisheries sector underutilised: CMFRI study 13.11.2017 Hindu: Home
No policy for risks such as decline in stock of fish species
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Researchers discover 260 million-year-old fossil forests in Antarctica 12.11.2017 Zee News : Science and Technology
During Antarctica's summer, scientists from University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee (UWM) in the US climbed the McIntyre Promontory's frozen slopes in the Transantarctic Mountains.
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The face of extinction: Image of world's last-of-its-kind male white rhino goes viral 10.11.2017 Zee News : Science and Technology
 Scientists are trying to develop IVF techniques that might keep the white rhino species alive.
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In whose favour will 101-year-old India's first voter exercise his franchise for? 7.11.2017 India Today| Must Read
All you need to know about India's first voter, a 101-year-old man from Himachal Pradesh's Kalpi district.
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Mammals emerged from shadows after dinosaur extinction, explains study 7.11.2017 DNA: Evolutions
Mammals started being active in the daytime about 66 million years ago when dinosaurs were wiped out, say scientists who suggest that our ancestors emerged from the shadows only when their vicious, giant predators disappeared. A long-standing theory holds that the common ancestor to all mammals was nocturnal, but the new discovery reveals when the mammals started living in the daytime for the first time.
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These are the animals that are still being sent into space! 6.11.2017 DNA: Money
Sixty years after Laika the dog became the first living creature to go into orbit, animals are still being sent into space -- though these days much smaller creatures are going up. Julie Robinson, chief scientist for the International Space Station programme, explains what we are still learning from animals in orbit. - Why no more dogs, cats or monkeys? - When those animals were sent into space, it was because people were afraid that mammalian species in general could not survive without gravity, and that people might suffocate. We really didn't know what it might be like to live in space without gravity. Today when we send animal into space we send large numbers of small animals in order to accomplish biomedical research goals. - What's going up now, and how do they adapt? - Just as we do with research on Earth, we typically use rodents, fruit flies, fish and other small animals. There have been some scientific studies with snails; we are considering rats for the future. For any experiment we do in ...
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Hotspots of rattan found in Western Ghats 4.11.2017 Hindu: Home
Unsustainable harvests are decimating rattan stands worldwide
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New Orangutan species 'among most threatened great apes' 3.11.2017 All News-IANS Stories
Scientists have identified an isolated population of orangutans living in Sumatra in Indonesia, which according to them are "among the most threatened great apes in the world".
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Scientists discover new species of orangutans, but they are already endangered 3.11.2017 Zee News : Science and Technology
The researchers say the population is highly vulnerable and its habitat is facing further pressure from development.
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Dinosaur-killing asteroid cooled Earth more than thought 2.11.2017 DNA: Top News
The Chicxulub asteroid impact - that wiped out the dinosaurs 66 million years ago - likely released climate-altering sulphur and cooled the Earth far more than originally thought, a study has found. The research makes a more refined estimate of how much sulphur and carbon dioxide gas were ejected into Earth's atmosphere from vaporised rocks immediately after the Chicxulub event.  Scientists estimate more than three times as much sulfur may have entered the air compared to what previous models assumed, implying the ensuing period of cool weather may have been colder than previously thought. The study lends support to the hypothesis that the impact played a significant role in the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event that eradicated nearly three-quarters of Earth's plant and animal species, according to Joanna Morgan, from the Imperial College London in the UK. "Many climate models can't currently capture all of the consequences of the Chicxulub impact due to uncertainty in how much gas was initially ...
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Delhi to host 9th global green film fest 31.10.2017 All News-IANS Stories
The ninth edition of CMS Vatavaran - an international film festival on environment and wildlife - will begin here from Thursday, showcasing 113 films, including four from Kashmir, one of the most ecologically sensitive zones facing the threat of global warming.
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Making a dramatic comeback 30.10.2017 Deccan Herald - Supplements
The Burmese star tortoise was almost history. By the early 2000s, the natives of central Myanmar's deserts had dwindled to such low counts in the wild that ecologists declared them functionally extinct. About the size of a football when mature, the animals sported yellow polygon patterns across their shells that helped them camouflage in dry grasses but also made them attractive as exotic pets, smuggled for thousands of dollars to the United States, Europe and other parts of Asia. Now, it appears that an eleventh-hour effort has pulled the species from the edge of extinction, according to a recent paper in the journal Herpetological Review. Steven Platt, a herpetologist for the Wildlife Conservation Society, and his collaborators outlined how setting up captive-bred assurance colonies in Myanmar has boosted the tortoise's prospects. Starting with fewer than 200 tortoises in 2004, the assurance colonies now number about 14,000 captive tortoises, and around 1,000 animals have already been reintroduced into ...
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Bamboo lemurs being pushed towards extinction due to climate change, warn researchers 30.10.2017 Zee News : Science and Technology
According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), there are only about 500 greater bamboo lemurs remaining in the wild.
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Spotting the frogmouths of Thattekad 30.10.2017 Hindu: News
The bird pairs located in the sanctuary have increased from two in 1983 to 42 at present
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