User: indiatogether Topic: Environment
Category: Biodiversity :: Species Loss
Last updated: Jan 19 2018 12:44 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 9,836    
Hunter caught with clouded leopard carcass 19.1.2018 The Assam Tribune
Hunter caught with clouded leopard carcass
Also found in: [+]
World to be a riskier place in 2018: WEF survey 17.1.2018 Hindustan Times - business
Referring to contentious issues between various nations, the World Economic Forum (WEF) said in its annual Global Risks Report that China’s determination to press territorial and maritime claims and its extension of the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) have triggered responses among neighbouring powers, with Japan and India exploring more structured forms of strategic cooperation in both economic and military affairs.
Also found in: [+]
Extreme weather conditions single most prominent risk to global economy: World Economic Forum 17.1.2018 Zee News : World
World Economic Forum's 48th annual meeting will take place on January 23-26, 2018, in Switzerland.
Also found in: [+]
Extreme weather most prominent risk, says World Economic Forum 17.1.2018 All News-IANS Stories
Extreme weather events have been seen as the single most prominent risk to the global economy by business leaders and policymakers, the World Economic Forum said on Wednesday.
Also found in: [+]
World to be riskier place in 2018: WEF Survey 17.1.2018 General News
The world will see risks related to environment, economy and international relations intensify this year with a majority of stakeholders expecting political or economic confrontations between major powers to worsen, a new survey showed today. Referring to contentious issues between various nations, the World Economic Forum (WEF) said in its annual Global Risks Report that China's determination to press territorial and maritime claims and its extension of the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) have triggered responses among neighbouring powers, with Japan and India exploring more structured forms of strategic cooperation in both economic and military affairs. "This initiative could become more significant if additional partners -- such as Australia, the US, or even European states -- were to take part. However, most of these countries are currently cautious and would be wary of allowing such a hedging policy to cause tensions with China," it said. However, the biggest risks .
Also found in: [+]
Selfing in worms causes genome loss 17.1.2018 FrontLine: Science & Technology
Reproduction in most animal species requires breeding between two individuals. But some worms have evolved the ability to go it alone. Now, a study led by a biologist at the University o...
Also found in: [+]
Reptile sex ratio turns turtle owing to global warming 17.1.2018 FrontLine: Science & Technology
Rising global temperatures are distorting the sex ratio among some reptiles and may bring the populations of some reptiles, such as sea turtles, to the brink of extinction in the not-so-distant fu...
Also found in: [+]
Missing the grass for the trees in Western Ghats 17.1.2018 Hindu: National
Drastic decline in shola grasslands in Palani Hill range
Also found in: [+]
Australia offers cash for Great Barrier Reef rescue ideas 16.1.2018 General News
Australia is calling on the world's top scientific minds to help save the Great Barrier Reef, offering hundreds of thousands of dollars to fund research into protecting the world's largest living structure. The UNESCO World Heritage-listed reef is reeling from significant coral bleaching due to warming sea temperatures linked to climate change. The 2,300-km site is also under pressure from farming runoff, development and predatory crown-of-thorns starfish, with experts warning it could be suffering irreparable damage. Today, the Australian government announced a USD 1.6 million funding pot available to people with bright ideas on how to save the reef. "The scale of the problem is big and big thinking is needed, but it's important to remember that solutions can come from anywhere," said Environment Minister Josh Frydenberg. He said the money would be available to the world's "greatest scientific minds, industry and business leaders, innovators and ...
Also found in: [+]
A new weapon in the carbon fight 15.1.2018 Hindu: Opinion
The ability of soils to sequester carbon as a win-win strategy must be recognised by policymakers
Also found in: [+]
Seven new species of spiders discovered; named after Harry Potter, GoT characters 15.1.2018 Zee News : Science and Technology
Two species are named after spider characters from the classic works by J R R Tolkien.
Also found in: [+]
New spider species named after 'Harry Potter' and 'Game of Thrones' characters 15.1.2018 DNA: Top News
Scientists in Brazil have discovered seven new species of spiders and named them after characters from literary classics - including Lord Varys from the Game of Thrones and Aragog from the Harry Potter series. The Lord of the Rings, The Silmarillion, H P Lovecraft's The Call of Cthulhu and the children's favourite Charlotte's Web and Little Miss Spider also inspired the names of small cave-dwelling six-eyed spiders inhabiting northern Brazil. The new species, discovered by scientists from Instituto Butantan, Sao Paulo, all belong to the same Neotropical genus Ochyrocera. While all seven previously unknown species prefer staying in the shadows underground, none of them has the adaptations characteristic for exclusively cave-dwelling organisms, such as loss of pigmentation and reduced or missing eyes. They are classified as edaphic troglophile species, which means that they are capable of completing their life cycle away from sunlight, but are not bound to the deepest recesses. Often crawling near the ...
Also found in: [+]
As forests, wildlife and tribals exist in uneasy equilibrium, could lions be prey to sixth mass extinction? 15.1.2018 Latest News India on Firstpost
We are in the middle of the sixth great mass extinction in Earth's history. To put this in perspective, Earth lost the dinosaurs in the last great mass extinction event, 65 million years ago - so this is kind of a big deal | #FirstCulture
Also found in: [+]
Experts suggest unconventional ways to reduce man-animal 14.1.2018 General News
Re-creating a fear barrier, one- shot contraception and keeping dead animals on jungle tracts for wild carnivores are some of the unconventional measures conservationists and wildlife experts suggest to reduce man- animal conflict. Belinda Wright, executive director of Wildlife Protection Society of India, said conflicts between humans and animals are inevitable, but their level has increased of late mainly due to increasing human encroachments on wildlife habitat. "If the government is serious about protecting India's wildlife, it must stop allowing the continued destruction and divergence of forest lands. This is the root cause behind the conflict," she said. "Forest corridors linking protected areas must be maintained where they exist, or created where they don't. Other measures such as swift delivery of compensation for livestock loss, property damage, or life lost due to conflict are important, but they are not long-term solutions," Wright told PTI. Thailand-based .
Also found in: [+]
State lacks inclusive list of flora, fauna: EPTRI 13.1.2018 Hindu: Hyderabad
Report also blames State’s fossil fuel-based economy for climate change
Also found in: [+]
Bengaluru is not monkeying around 13.1.2018 Hindu: Energy & Environment
Loss of trees has led to urban primates raiding apartments; proposal to move them to rehab centre
Also found in: [+]
Why world's largest flying bird is on verge of extinction in India 13.1.2018 News
The world's largest flying bird is likely to be the first in the sub-continent to slide into extinction in the 21st century. Ironically, the biggest threat to its survival comes from renewable energy
Also found in: [+]
Great Indian Bustard fights losing battle of survival as energy-hungry India embarks on renewable power overdrive 13.1.2018 Latest News India on Firstpost
The bustard lives on less than a third of the national park, where about 4 percent of park land is controlled by the forest department.
Also found in: [+]
Eating muesli in breakfast may help combat arthritis 13.1.2018 General News
Eating a fibre-rich breakfast consisting of muesli and enough fruit and vegetables throughout the day everyday can help maintain a rich variety of bacterial species in the gut, which may have positive influence on chronic inflammatory joint diseases, and prevent bone loss, a study has found.
Also found in: [+]
Floods due to global warming will put humanity at risk in coming 20 years 12.1.2018 Zee News : Science and Technology
Already today, fluvial floods are among the most common and devastating natural disasters, researchers said.
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 9,836