User: iihs_blore Topic: iihs_feeds_v3
Category: All-Channels :: Climate
Last updated: Jul 13 2018 11:52 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Problems mounting for tea producers 13.7.2018 The Assam Tribune
Problems mounting for tea producers
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Africa's iconic baobab trees dying off at alarming rate 12.7.2018 Life | The Asian Age
Climate change is a suspected factor but no definite cause is known.
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African woman tells UN that climate change is security risk 12.7.2018 DNA: Bangalore
African woman tells UN that climate change is security risk
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Climate change causing high-altitude clouds to becoming increasingly visible 6.7.2018 The Asian Age | Home
Here is what a new study has found.
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Punjab grappling with shrinking water supply: Experts 6.7.2018 The Tribune
Tribune News Service Ludhiana, July 5 Agriculture consumes 86 per cent of Punjab’s water. According to agricultural experts, shrinking water supply is a major challenge for the state. Water table has gone down from 20 feet in 1970 to more than 200 feet in 2017. This was stated by Dr Manjit S Kang, Adjunct Professor, Kansas State University, Manhattan, US, and former Vice-Chancellor of the PAU, who was here to attend an international workshop on ‘Innovations in Sustainable Water Resource Management’at CT University. He said the WORLDCLIM- DIVA system prediction for Ludhiana/Punjab says there will be more than 2.5 C change in the average temperature in Punjab between 2000 and 2050. The average annual rainfall will decrease by 75 mm to 100 mm (11 per cent). “Agricultural sustainability depends on the sustainability of water resources,” he said. He said climate change impacted the sustainability of water resources. Droughts, heavy rains, unseasonal rains and floods were on the rise due to climate ...
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Governor stresses research in varsities to resolve local issues 5.7.2018 The Tribune
Tribune News Service Srinagar, July 4 During the first convocation of Central University Kashmir (CUK), Governor NN Vohra on Wednesday underscored the need for research programmes in universities to find solutions to local problems. In his presidential address, Vohra noted that the relevance of a university was determined by the extent to which its faculty and scholars were engaged in undertaking research programmes to find solutions to the problems faced by the people in the state. “I have been suggesting to the vice chancellors that the importance of their universities directly relates to the extent of research carried out on local issues, relating to climate change, preservation of water bodies, biodiversity and ecology, master planning of our cities, traffic management and other problems faced by our state,” he said. He said J&K had certain historical and geographical disadvantages which have constrained its growth as a knowledge society. “We have attracted many eminent academicians from outside the ...
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Eight countries come together to protect Bay of Bengal 4.7.2018 Downtoearth
With major GEF grant countries set aside political differences and try to restore the mangroves and coral reefs of the world’s largest bay
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Sanjay Mishra excited about his film on water crisis 4.7.2018 Free Press Journal: Glam
Sanjay Mishra is happy to be part of a film, which touches upon the issue of water crisis in a village
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Air conditioning could add to global warming woes 4.7.2018 The Tribune
WASHINGTON: The increased use of air conditioning in buildings could add to the problems of a warming world by further degrading air quality and compounding the toll of air pollution on human health, a study warns. Researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison forecast as many as a thousand additional deaths annually in the Eastern US alone due to elevated levels of air pollution driven by the increased use of fossil fuels to cool the buildings where humans live and work. “What we found is that air pollution will get worse. There are consequences for adapting to future climate change,” said David Abel, lead author of the study published in the journal PLOS Medicine. The analysis combines projections from five different models to forecast increased summer energy use in a warmer world and how that would affect power consumption from fossil fuels, air quality and, consequently, human health just a few decades into the future. In hot summer weather, and as heat waves are projected to increase in ...
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GCZMA ‘not party’ to state’s nod to CRZ draft notification 4.7.2018 Goa News – The Navhind Times
NT NETWORK   PANAJI The state environment department has sent suggestions to the Union ministry of environment, forest and climate change on the draft CRZ notification, 2018, without consulting the main environment protection agency – Goa Coastal Zone Management Authority. Environment director Ravi Jha has sent a letter to the Union ministry mentioning that “the ...
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Uttarakhand cloudburst: urbanisation, warming continue to intensify the impact 2.7.2018 Downtoearth
Sunday's incident follows the trend of a steep rise in number of days with cloudburst-like events in the Himalayas from 2001 to 2013
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Uttarakhand cloudburst: urbanisation, warming likely factors for high impact 2.7.2018 Downtoearth
Data shows a steep rise in number of days with cloudburst-like events in the Himalayas from 2001 to 2013
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Combating Manmade Menace Of Dengue 2.7.2018 Commentary – The Navhind Times
Nandkumar M Kamat   My student, a doctorate from biotechnology department of Goa University,  Dr Janneth Rodrigues, 45, from Candolim, a research team leader at GlaxoSmithKline, Tres Cantos Medicines Development Campus for investigating Diseases of the Developing World, Madrid, Spain, can’t believe that her home state Goa would be gripped by Dengue because she is working on ...
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Savour these food items before you regret 1.7.2018 Free Press Journal: Food
The rising emissions of greenhouse gases, erratic weather and temperature patterns might make us miss
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Forests may lose ability to tackle climate change due to global warming 1.7.2018 Life | The Asian Age
Forest canopies produce microclimates that are less variable and more stable than similar settings without forest cover.
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Warnings from the past: Sea levels will rise, 78 Indian cities to see floods 29.6.2018 Downtoearth
While more than a century-old data projects a warmer world, India still needs a proper regional data on climate vulnerability
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AAP accuses Harsh Vardhan of ‘misguiding’ people over cutting of trees 28.6.2018 National News – The Navhind Times
PTI   NEW DELHI The Aam Aadmi Party today accused Union Environment Minister Harsh Vardhan of “misguiding” people over the plan to cut down over 16,500 trees in the national capital for redevelopment of seven colonies, claiming that his ministry had given environment clearance to the project. AAP spokesperson Saurabh Bhardwaj claimed that the environmental ...
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Is India ready to face the silent disaster? 27.6.2018 Downtoearth
Heat waves are likely to increase by up to 30 times by 2100; the government needs to focus on the most vulnerable population, including the poor, women, children, elderly and disabled
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‘Sustainable farming can help tackle climate change’ 27.6.2018 Hindu: Medicine & Research
Lecture series seeks to promote dialogue, create awareness
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North may turn into a ‘dust bowl’ 26.6.2018 The Tribune
Tribune News Service New Delhi, June 25 As North India awaits its share of Southwest monsoon, do weather occurrences in the pre-monsoon period this year (unprecedentedly violent dust storms and thunderstorms) a forewarning of an impending ecological disaster in the region — the making of a “dust bowl”? Chandra Bhushan, Deputy Director General of the Centre for Science and Environment, says there are several similarities between prevailing weather conditions over North India and the ones that led to the creation of a “dust bowl” in America in the 1930s. Rising temperatures, change in wind and weather patterns are all adding to the man-made reasons — unsustainable water-guzzling agriculture, lowering of groundwater and deforestation — to the possibility of North India turning into a “dust bowl”. “It’s time the government recognises it and builds a narrative around land management and soil conservation or else we may be headed for more intense dust storms in future,” he warns. He says the ecological ...
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