User: flenvcenter Topic: Water-National
Category: Water Quality :: Wetlands
Last updated: Aug 26 2016 21:14 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 5,895    
Five myths about mosquitoes 26.8.2016 Washington Post: Op-Eds
Sorry, air conditioning and citronella won’t protect you.
Also found in: [+]
Sailors swamp Bulldogs to open volleyball season 26.8.2016 Steamboat Pilot
With a flurry of hard hits and plenty of big digs, the Steamboat Springs High School volleyball team showed Thursday it’s still at the top of the heap in Northwest Colorado. The Sailors beat Moffat County to win what was the season opener for both teams in three sets. Steamboat won, 25-16, 25-11, 25-11. “Overall, I’m really, really happy with what we did,” Steamboat coach Wendy Hall said. She had reason to be nervous, as the team she sent onto the court had a serious lack of varsity experience. Only one of the six starters saw considerable minutes a year ago, and four of those six saw none at all. They didn’t necessarily look like savvy veterans from the first point to the last, but they did flash plenty of skill, they did bounce back from several tough Moffat runs and they did come away with a solid win on their home court. “When you have four kids out there who’ve never played varsity, you don’t know how they’ll react,” Hall said. “You don’t know if they’ll panic or have deer-in-the-headlights syndrome ...
Also found in: [+]
Hide and seek championship to be held in Italian ghost town 25.8.2016 TreeHugger
Grown-ups frolicking in an abandoned Italian resort reminds us that playing isn’t just for kids.
Also found in: [+]
Climate Change This Week: Heating Up, Melting Away, Upping Wind Power, and More! 24.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Today, the Earth got a little hotter, and a little more crowded. Saving BUB, Beautiful Unique Biodiversity, like this Jeweled Flower Mantis found in Asian forests, is another reason to save these important ecosystems. Source Pinterest Forests: the cheapest way to store carbon OO Malaysia: Sarawak Establishes 2+ Million Acres Of Protected Areas and may add 1.1 million more... now will these truly be protected from illegal deforestation? Stay tuned, folks. <> Credit Dan at freedigitalphotos.net OO Rising Temperatures Stunt Tree Growth new research finds iconic Douglas firs across the West are water- and heat-stressed. Rising Temperatures Fuel Fires - the Sobranes, CA wildfire has destroyed nearly 70,000 acres of forest and destroyed over 40 homes. Source www.wcvb.com OO 43 Large US West Wildfires as of August 24, 2016 shows the US Forest Service wildfire map. OO New England Is Being Deforested since the 1980s due to expansion of affluent suburbs, says a new study; since then 5% of its forests has been ...
Also found in: [+]
Diversions, Old Vegetation and New Vegetation 24.8.2016 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
By Jenneke Visser, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, & Andy Nyman, Louisiana State University This is part five of the series “Building Land in Coastal Louisiana: Expert Recommendations for Operating a Successful Sediment Diversion that Balances Ecosystem and Community Needs.” See previous parts on the Sediment Diversion Operations Expert Working Group , Hydrodynamics of a sediment diversion , Geology of land building using sediment diversions , and Building land while balancing historic and cultural effects . In the last 50 years, coastal Louisiana has lost about 20% of its wetlands (see map) , which is an area about the size of Delaware. In most other coastal areas, wetland loss happens abruptly because of conversion to homes, harbors, shrimp farms, etc. Here in coastal Louisiana, however, most wetland loss happens gradually because of conversion to open water due to some natural processes and human alteration of other natural processes. Simply replanting vegetation fails to restore wetlands ...
Also found in: [+]
Day After Obama Tours Louisiana Flood Damage, Government Holds Massive Gulf Oil and Gas Lease Auction 24.8.2016 Truthout - All Articles
On Tuesday, President Obama visited Louisiana for the first time since the devastating floods that killed 13 people and damaged 60,000 homes. The Red Cross has called it the worst natural disaster in the United States since Hurricane Sandy. While many climate scientists have tied the historic floods in Louisiana to climate change, President Obama made no link during his remarks. However, on Tuesday, four environmental activists were arrested in New Orleans protesting the Interior Department's decision to go ahead with a lease sale of up to 24 million acres in the Gulf of Mexico for oil and gas exploration and development. The sale is being held today in the Superdome -- the very building where thousands of displaced residents of New Orleans sought refuge during Hurricane Katrina 11 years ago. We speak to Antonia Juhasz, an oil and energy analyst, author of Black Tide: The Devastating Impact of the Gulf Oil Spill. She joins us from San Francisco. TRANSCRIPT AMY GOODMAN: On Tuesday, President Obama visited ...
Also found in: [+]
Day After Obama Tours Louisiana Flood Damage, Gov't Holds Massive Gulf Oil & Gas Lease Auction 24.8.2016 Democracy Now!
On Tuesday, President Obama visited Louisiana for the first time since the devastating floods that killed 13 people and damaged 60,000 homes. The Red Cross has called it the worst natural disaster in the United States since Hurricane Sandy. While many climate scientists have tied the historic floods in Louisiana to climate change, President Obama made no link during his remarks. However, on Tuesday, four environmental activists were arrested in New Orleans protesting the Interior Department's decision to go ahead with a lease sale of up to 24 million acres in the Gulf of Mexico for oil and gas exploration and development. The sale is being held today in the Superdome—the very building where thousands of displaced residents of New Orleans sought refuge during Hurricane Katrina 11 years ago. We speak to Antonia Juhasz, an oil and energy analyst, author of "Black Tide: The Devastating Impact of the Gulf Oil Spill." She joins us from San Francisco.
Also found in: [+]
Reconnecting the Delta: How Increased Mud Supply Can Improve Sediment Diversions 22.8.2016 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
Jordan Davis, Mississippi River Delta Restoration Science Intern, Environmental Defense Fund Rising sea level and anthropogenic sediment loss is a combination affecting sustainability of deltaic ecosystems. Around the world, major deltas have been experiencing a 44% decline in sediment supply since the 1950s due to construction of dams and reservoirs, including the Mississippi River Delta. A recent journal article , published in Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, examined the role of fine-grained sediments in deltaic restoration. The authors found that the supply of suspended mud (silt and clay) to the coast has dropped from a mean of 390 Mt y-1 (megatonnes per year) to just 100 Mt y-1 since 1970. These fine-grained sediments play a crucial role in estuarine ecosystems by sustaining existing marshes. Almost 100 dams, built as part of the Pick-Sloan water development project, trap mud that once flowed from the Missouri River Basin, resulting in high erosion of very fine sediment, known as loess, in ...
Also found in: [+]
Indigenous Australians Fight Planned Nuclear Dump On Sacred Lands 19.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
(Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Enice Marsh remembers the black clouds of “poison stuff” that billowed from the northwest after British atomic bomb tests in the 1950s spread fallout across swathes of South Australia. Now a new kind of radioactivity could head to her ancestral home in the remote Flinders Ranges - a nuclear waste dump. “To me, it feels like a death penalty,” said Marsh, 73, standing in the cemetery of the outback town of Hawker, where many of her relatives are buried under red earth. “We are one big family and the land also is family to us. We care for the land just in the same way we care for our family.” South Australia is at the heart of a debate over the nation’s nuclear future that highlights a familiar tension between quick economic gain and long-term custodianship of land occupied by Aboriginal people for more than 50,000 years. Two separate proposals divide opinion in the state with the country’s biggest uranium mine and a history going back nearly 20 years of saying “no” to nuclear ...
Also found in: [+]
Revenge of the goldfish: Dumped pets growing into giant monsters 18.8.2016 TreeHugger
A gentle reminder to never, ever, Free Willy your goldfish.
Also found in: [+]
EPA sues Wildcat Mining over violations of Clean Water Act 18.8.2016 Durango Herald
In the latest in a string of troubles for Wildcat Mining Corp., the Environmental Protection Agency last week filed a lawsuit against the company, alleging it has violated the Clean Water Act for almost a decade by dumping fill material into a waterway and building a wastewater pond in a wetland.The...
Also found in: [+]
Indian elephant that washed up in Bangladesh dies 16.8.2016 Washington Post: World
An adult Indian elephant that became trapped in a swamp in Bangladesh after being caught in raging floodwaters died on Tuesday after weeks of struggling for survival, a conservation official said.
Also found in: [+]
Indian elephant that washed up in Bangladesh dies 16.8.2016 Seattle Times: Top stories

NEW DELHI (AP) — An adult Indian elephant that became trapped in a swamp in Bangladesh after being caught up in raging floodwaters has died after weeks of struggling for survival. Tapan Kumar Dey, a former forest conservator who was overseeing the rescue operation said the elephant died early Tuesday. The reasons for the death […]
Also found in: [+]
Six takeaways from Pete Carroll’s meeting with the media Monday: Good offensive line play, Brandon Browner progressing, and more 16.8.2016 Seattle Times: Top stories

Here are six key takeaways from Pete Carroll's meeting with the media following Monday's practice.
Service Day at the Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle 15.8.2016 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
By Samantha Carter, Senior Outreach Coordinator, Restore the Mississippi River Delta Coalition Welcome sign to the Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle. The platform at the end of Caffin Avenue in the Lower Ninth Ward over looks Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle . The Wetland Triangle, which makes up 400 acres of the 30,000 acre Central Wetlands Unit, is where Bayou Bienvenue begins to snake along the wetlands that make up the border of Orleans and St. Bernard Parishes and eventually ends in Lake Borgne. Once a thriving cypress swamp, the Triangle provided the adjacent neighborhood with fishing, trapping, timber and recreation. This important natural resource was lost when the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet (MRGO) shipping channel was completed in the 1960s and allowed saltwater to enter the mostly freshwater ecosystem. As the saltwater killed the swamp trees, such as bald cypress, the Triangle turned to open water. Beautiful viewing platform overlooking the Wetland Triangle. Often called a “ghost swamp”, the ...
Also found in: [+]
Neighbors worry about Mercer Slough amid East Link light-rail construction 15.8.2016 Seattle Times: Local

As construction of Sound Transit’s East Link line through Bellevue begins, neighbors worry about the promised protections to Mercer Slough Nature Park and the historic Winters House and whether the city needs stronger protections for the use of parkland.
Also found in: [+]
Seahawks updated 53-man roster projection after preseason week one 15.8.2016 Seattle Times: Top stories

There's a few changes to our 53-man roster projection after the Seahawks' first preseason game of 2016.
300-million-year-old, corkscrew-shaped poop belonged to a cannibal shark 12.8.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
In the summer of 2015 in New Brunswick, Canada, a man picked up a brown and black stone shaped sort of like a tiny pine cone. Most folks would have probably flicked it aside, thinking the object was just another pebble. But this man knew what he was doing, and he’d come to the Minto Coalfield for a reason. It was the first place in North America where fossil fuel was mined, dating back to 1639. Much of this continent’s coal was formed around 300 million years ago during what scientists call the ...
Also found in: [+]
Rebuilding and Restoring the Caminada Headland 11.8.2016 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
By Simone Theriot Maloz, Executive Director, Restore or Retreat, Inc . Simone Maloz (in white) standing on the newly restored Caminada Headland. I have always loved the beach, and now, even more so, knowing that the restoration of critical habitat is near complete on the Caminada Headland! With funding available from criminal fines as a result of the 2010 oil spill, the Caminada Headland Beach and Dune Restoration Project kicked back into high gear in 2015, thanks to over $144 million from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF). The funds, which are on top of the previous $70 million from the State for the first increment already constructed, will go a very long way—over 13 miles to be exact—to making this one of the most beautiful and most important beach habitats along the Gulf Coast. Over the last 100 years, the Caminada Headland has experienced significant shoreline erosion and land loss, averaging 35 feet per year, to its marsh, wetland, beach and dune habitats as a result of storm ...
Also found in: [+]
How credit stacking can grow money on trees 11.8.2016 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Exploring the opportunities to generate cash flow for family forests using conservation payments.
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 5,895