User: flenvcenter Topic: Water-National
Category: Water Quality :: Wetlands
Last updated: Nov 01 2014 06:03 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Happy Halloween: Beware of the Rougarou! 1.11.2014 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
This is a rougarou. On Saturday October 25th, the Restore the Mississippi River Delta field team came together to recruit supporters for coastal restoration at Rougarou Fest in Houma, Louisiana. Rougarou Fest is a family-friendly festival with a spooky flair that celebrates the rich folklore that exists along the bayous of Southeast Louisiana. It is also the primary fundraiser supporting the South Louisiana Wetlands Discovery Center , a nonprofit, tax-exempt organization that is working to educate individuals about Louisiana’s disappearing coast. If you are not a native to southern Louisiana, you may be wondering, “What is a rougarou?” The rougarou legend has been spread for many generations directly from French settlers. In the  Cajun  legends, the rougarou is said to prowl the swamps around  Acadiana  and  Greater New Orleans as well as the fields and forests of the regions. The rougarou is a creature with a human body and the head of a wolf or dog, similar to a werewolf! Rougarou Fest was full of fun, ...
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Argentina default spreads to Par bonds, raising acceleration risk 31.10.2014 Yahoo: Business
By Sarah Marsh and Daniel Bases BUENOS AIRES/NEW YORK (Reuters) - Argentina's debt default spread to its Par bonds on Friday after the country failed to complete an interest payment, raising the risk that creditors could demand that its cash-strapped government immediately repay all of its debt. The country last month deposited a $161 million payment with a newly appointed local trustee to try to circumvent U.S. court orders for it to settle with "holdout" investors suing for full repayment of bonds from a 2002 default before paying debtholders who accepted a restructuring. ...
Strong After Sandy: Healing the Past, Investing in the Future 30.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The eye of Hurricane Sandy came ashore two years ago, devastating communities along the Atlantic Coast with record storm surge, fierce winds and torrential rain. The damage was so extensive that to this day many people are still struggling to rebuild homes and businesses and put their lives back together. For wildlife resource managers, Sandy was a wake-up call to the vulnerability of the beaches, sand dunes, and coastal marshes that not only provide habitat for fish and wildlife but also protect local communities from flooding. At national wildlife refuges, the surge left miles of debris and hazardous materials littered across fragile wildlife habitat. Rain washed out roads, trails and dikes and destroyed many visitor trails and facilities. The storm also demonstrated how nature can be a fortress as well as a force. At Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge in New Jersey, Hurricane Sandy left a 22-mile debris field of boats, fuel tanks, chemical drums, and other hazardous materials in sensitive ...
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Remains found in Oregon are those of missing Spanaway man 30.10.2014 Seattle Times: Local
The Associated Press
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Autopsy: Remains those of missing Washington man 30.10.2014 AP Washington
KLAMATH FALLS, Ore. (AP) -- Human remains found earlier this month in Klamath County have been identified as those of a Washington state man missing since 2012....
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Latest Mississippi River Delta News: Oct. 29, 2014 29.10.2014 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
Private Landowners to Benefit from New Gulf Restoration Partnership By Laine Kaplan-Levenson, WWNO. Oct. 28, 2014. “U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack was in Norco, LA on Monday to announce a new environmental initiative aimed at private landowners along the Gulf Coast…” ( read more ) U.S. Agriculture Secretary Announces New Gulf oil spill Recovery Program By Janet McConnaughey, Associate Press. Oct. 28, 2014. “It’s a way to ensure private landowners can receive the right sort of incentives to undertake the kinds of good stewardship work that ultimately contribute to broader restoration goals for the Gulf…” ( read more ) Life on a Louisiana island slowly disappearing into the sea By Anna Bressanin, Jack Garland, BBC. Oct. 29, 2014. “The US state of Louisiana is slowly disappearing into the Gulf of Mexico…” ( read more ) Louisiana sues Corps of Engineers for $3 billion cost of repairing MR-GO damaged wetlands By Mark Schleifstein, The Times-Picayune. Oct. 28, 2014. “The state of Louisiana sued the ...
What New York City Can Learn From Its Relationship With The Sea 29.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Can New York City survive the sea? This is the question Ted Steinberg, a Case Western Reserve University professor, poses in his recent book, Gotham Unbound: The Ecological History of Greater New York . From the days when Mannahatta island was home to the indigenous Lenape tribe to today's five-borough metropolis that houses more than 8 million people, one thing has remained constant: the story of New York City cannot be separated from water. The city received a painful reminder of this two years ago when Hurricane Sandy struck the region, killing dozens, causing billions in damage and paralyzing the city's transportation system. Sandy's record-setting 13-foot storm surge revealed the vulnerability of Lower Manhattan in an era of rising sea levels . The Huffington Post spoke with Steinberg about the city's aquatic history and what the future may hold for Gotham. What first prompted you to study New York City’s ecological history and its relationship with the sea? First, simple intellectual curiosity ...
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200 missing as mudslides swamp Sri Lanka tea region 29.10.2014 World
Mudslides triggered by monsoon rains swept through a tea-growing region of Sri Lanka on Wednesday, killing at least 10 people and leaving around 200 more missing, disaster officials said. Some of the worst damage was recorded at a well-known tea plantation several hours' drive to the east of the capital Colombo. "We have reports of 140 houses getting washed away in the mudslides," Sarath Kumara, a spokesman for the national Disaster Management Centre, told AFP. Kumara said 10 bodies had been recovered by noon after the disaster in the Koslanda region, around 200 kilometres (125 miles) east of ...
California drought takes bite out of rice harvest 29.10.2014 AP Business
WOODLAND, Calif. (AP) -- California's deepening drought is shrinking its rice harvest, and that's bad news for farmers, migratory birds and sushi lovers....
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California drought takes bite out of rice harvest, reducing wildlife habitat and sushi grains 29.10.2014 Star Tribune: Business
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North Dakota to decide whether to put oil revenue into conservation 28.10.2014 LA Times: Nation
North Dakota has a $450-million budget surplus and the nation's lowest unemployment rate, but only about 725,000 people to enjoy it — less than one-fifth the population of Los Angeles.
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U.S. Highway 40 project in Steamboat Springs passes milestone 28.10.2014 Steamboat Pilot
With the news that asphalt paving is now complete on this season’s U.S. Highway 40 construction project, motorists can turn the page on the traffic delays that have often complicated the morning and evening commutes since early August. “As far as major delays, you’re not going to see that any more,” Project Manager Eric Marsh of Connell Resources said Monday. Marsh confirmed that paving crews made the most of the unseasonably mild weather of Oct. 20 to 25 to complete their work on the stretch of the highway from the Mount Werner interchange to Walton Creek Road. “We definitely hustled to get it done,” Marsh said. “The last two weeks in October was better weather than I saw in August. We got lucky, and the pressure has been lifted.” Hedging his bets a little, Marsh said in late July that the completion date for the $5.8 million project was Dec. 5. The big job, which involved roto-milling old asphalt and replacing it, as well as replacing curb and gutter in a number of stretches, began at the U.S. 40's ...
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Gulf Oil Spill Left Rhode Island-Sized Oily 'Bathtub Ring' On Seafloor, Study Finds 28.10.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON (AP) — The BP oil spill left an oily "bathub ring" on the sea floor that's about the size of Rhode Island, new research shows. The study by David Valentine, the chief scientist on the federal damage assessment research ships, estimates that about 10 million gallons of oil coagulated on the floor of the Gulf of Mexico around the damaged Deepwater Horizons oil rig. Valentine, a geochemistry professor at the University of California Santa Barbara, said the spill from the Macondo well left other splotches containing even more oil. He said it is obvious where the oil is from, even though there were no chemical signature tests because over time the oil has degraded. "There's this sort of ring where you see around the Macondo well where the concentrations are elevated," Valentine said. The study, published in Monday's Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, calls it a "bathtub ring." Oil levels inside the ring were as much as 10,000 times higher than outside the 1,200-square-mile ring, ...
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Ocean Spray shooting footage for signature cranberry commercials in Warrens bog 24.10.2014 Star Tribune: Business
Stone tools show ancient settlement high in Andes 23.10.2014 AP Top News
NEW YORK (AP) -- The air was thin, the nights were cold, the sun could easily burn the skin. But about 12,000 years ago, small groups of hunter-gatherers found a home very high up in the Peruvian Andes....
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Stone tools show ancient settlement high in Andes 23.10.2014 Yahoo: Top Stories
NEW YORK (AP) — The air was thin, the nights were cold, the sun could easily burn the skin. But about 12,000 years ago, small groups of hunter-gatherers found a home very high up in the Peruvian ...
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Living the high life: Ancient hunter-gatherers settled at great elevations in Peru's Andes 23.10.2014 Star Tribune: Nation
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Top attorney opposes water rule 23.10.2014 Durango Herald
DENVER – Colorado Attorney General John Suthers is the latest to weigh in on a proposed federal water rule, writing to environmental officials to oppose it.The state’s chief attorney, a Republican, raised local control and economic issues related to the proposed expansion of regulatory authority over streams and...
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Organizations Deliver Comments to EPA from more than 700,000 Americans Who Support Clean Water 22.10.2014 NRDC: News/Media Center Feed
WASHINGTON (October 22, 2014) – More than 700,000 Americans have written to support a plan to protect streams and wetlands nationwide that are vulnerable to pollution, and today a diverse coalition of conservation organizations and clean water advocates delivered their comments to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Army Corps of Engineers. The two agencies have proposed a rule that will help fix problematic language in the Clean Water Act that leaves streams, wetlands and other water bodies vulnerable to ...
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Down by the River 22.10.2014 Orion Magazine Articles
Collaboration and innovation restore a community’s relationship with the Yuma River.
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