User: flenvcenter Topic: Water-National
Category: Water Quality :: Wetlands
Last updated: May 27 2015 06:40 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Navy sub sailor pleads guilty to videotaping female officers 27.5.2015 Yahoo: US National
MAYPORT NAVAL STATION, Fla. (AP) — A Navy submarine sailor was sentenced Tuesday to two years in a military prison after he pleaded guilty to illegally making and trading videos of female officers undressing in the shower.
Five Seahawks players to watch during OTAs 26.5.2015 Seattle Times: Top stories
Here are five Seahawks to watch as the team begins OTAs this week.
Farmers Fight Real Estate Developers for Kenya's Most Prized Asset: Land 25.5.2015 Truthout.com
David Njeru, a farmer from central Kenya, attends to his cabbages. This community is at risk of being displaced from their land by powerful real estate developers. (Photo: Miriam Gathigah/IPS) Ngangarithi, Kenya - Vegetables grown in the lush soil of this quiet agricultural community in central Kenya’s fertile wetlands not only feed the farmers who tend the crops, but also make their way into the marketplaces of Nairobi, the country’s capital, some 150 km south. Spinach, carrots, kale, cabbages, tomatoes, maize, legumes and tubers are plentiful here in the village of Ngangarithi, a landscape awash in green, intersected by clean, clear streams that local children play in. Ngangarithi, home to just over 25,000 people, is part of Nyeri County located in the Central Highlands, nestled between the eastern foothills of the Abadare mountain range and the western hillsides of Mount Kenya. In the early 20th century, this region was the site of territorial clashes between the British imperial army and native ...
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With new EPA water rule, Obama again takes executive action on environment 25.5.2015 LA Times: Nation
In April 1989, a Michigan developer named John Rapanos dumped fill on 54 acres of wetlands he owned to make way for a shopping center. He did not have a permit, and when the state told him to stop, he refused. Courts found him in violation of the federal Clean Water Act. Prosecutors wanted to send...
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Deadly storms swamp Plains, Midwest, force Texans from homes 25.5.2015 Yahoo: US National
SAN MARCOS, Texas (AP) — A line of storms stretching from the Gulf of Mexico to the Great Lakes dumped record rainfall on parts of the Plains and Midwest, spawning tornadoes and causing major flooding that forced at least 2,000 Texans from their homes.
‘Do No Harm:’ where the margin for error is scalpel-thin 24.5.2015 Seattle Times: Top stories
English neurosurgeon Henry Marsh’s mesmerizing memoir “Do No Harm” is an unblinking look at a profession that demands life-or-death decisions on a daily basis.
Confessions of a Brain Surgeon 23.5.2015 Wall St. Journal: Opinion
Just as he was celebrating a successful surgery, Henry Marsh nicked an artery and the patient slipped into a coma.
ERROR: Missing Story Title 22.5.2015 Boston Globe: Latest
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Devastating Photos Show How An Oil Spill Consumed Santa Barbara's Coastline 22.5.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Animals and marine life are washing up on Santa Barbara's shores after a ruptured underground pipeline leaked an estimated total of 105,000 gallons of crude oil on Tuesday -- 21,000 gallons of which ended up in the ocean. Shayne Tuthill, a local resident who was cleaning up a section of the coastline with a group of volunteers, told The Huffington Post that he saw oiled fish, squid, and even a seal and a pelican that appeared to be dying on the beach. "It was really sad to see the seal because it came to shore and couldn't breathe or swim," he said. "The pelican was alive at one point. It landed, but it was consumed by the oil ... and died." Official cleanup crews supervised by the U.S. Coast Guard have spent the past three days working on the beach. Wildlife officials say they've counted at least five oiled brown pelicans . As of Thursday evening, more than 8,300 gallons of oily water had been collected , according to the Los Angeles Times, but Coast Guard officials say it could take months to restore ...
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Conservation Groups Commend Congressional Funding of Louisiana Coastal Restoration Projects 22.5.2015 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
Emily Guidry Schatzel, National Wildlife Federation, 225.253.9781, schatzele@nwf.org Jacques Hebert, National Audubon Society, 504.264.6849, jhebert@audubon.org Elizabeth Van Cleve, Environmental Defense Fund, 202.553.2543, evancleve@edf.org Conservation Groups Commend Congressional Funding of Louisiana Coastal Restoration Projects Funding will help advance crucial, long-needed Louisiana coastal restoration efforts (Washington, D.C.—May 21, 2015) Today, the U.S. Senate Committee on Appropriations included critical funding for the Louisiana Coastal Area (LCA) Program in its Fiscal Year 2016 (FY 16) Energy and Water Development Appropriations bill. The legislation comes after a request in the President’s FY 16 budget of $50,000 for LCA General Investigations and $10 million for LCA Beneficial Use of Dredged Materials (BUD Mat) Construction. The U.S. House of Representatives also included these levels of funding it its FY 16 Energy and Water Development Appropriations bill. National and local conservation ...
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How agriculture’s resilience to climate change benefits us all 22.5.2015 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
By Sara Kroopf 81 percent of Americans live in cities, but rely on urban areas for everyday needs. Traditionally, governments haven’t factored farms and ranches into their climate mitigation and adaptation planning. Instead, the focus has mostly been on protecting urban communities. But that is all changing. At the National Adaptation Forum earlier this month in St. Louis, agriculture was top-of-mind in discussions about reducing emissions and building resilience to climate change. That’s because in order to protect people, 81 percent of whom live in urban areas, we’ll need to protect what’s around where they live, too. It’s largely rural areas, like the farming town of 1,100 people where I grew up, whose working lands and farms provide valuable services to urban areas. These services include food security, flood and drought protection, recreation and water storage. Agriculture can also play (and is already playing) a big role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions . The more resilient we can make ...
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Does death penalty bring closure? 21.5.2015 CNN: Top Stories
Last week a federal jury sentenced Dzhokhar Tsarnaev to death, and Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh issued a statement expressing "hope [that] this verdict provides a small amount of closure" to everyone affected by the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing.
Spike In Dolphin Deaths Directly Tied To Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill, Researchers Say 21.5.2015 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
A dramatic increase in dolphin deaths in the Gulf of Mexico is directly linked to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, scientists concluded in a report published Wednesday . Following the 2010 explosion on the drilling rig owned by British Petroleum (BP) and the subsequent spill of 4.9 million barrels (205.8 million gallons) of oil into the ocean, scientists have documented 1,281 dead and stranded cetaceans , primarily bottlenose dolphins, along the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico. In this photo taken May 10, 2015, a dead dolphin washes ashore in the Gulf of Mexico on Grand Isle, Louisiana. In 2011, Louisiana saw 163 dolphins stranded , while Mississippi had 111. By comparison, each of those states saw an average of 20 such incidents per year from 2002 through 2009, reported the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration . One in three of the dolphins recovered from the coasts of Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama suffered from otherwise rarely-seen adrenal lesions consistent with petroleum product ...
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India's Bellandur Lake Is So Polluted It Caught Fire 20.5.2015 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Whoever said water couldn't burn didn't pollute hard enough. Residents in Bangalore, India, were alarmed earlier this week when a local lake caught fire. For several weeks, Bellandur Lake has been covered with several feet of toxic foam that some have said resembles snow from far away, according to The Hindu. Beneath the snow-white lather, the water has turned black from chemicals and sewage. A canal that once carried water from Bellandur Lake to Varthur Lake is filled with toxic foam. The foam apparently caught fire last week, burning for most of last Friday night, as seen in a shocking video recorded from its banks, the Bangalore Mirror reported. Experts told the outlet a slurry of oil and phosphorus from untreated industrial waste and sewage likely created the conditions for the combustable cocktail to ignite. Areas of nearby wetlands that had helped to filter the lake in the past were destroyed by development. "These wetlands used to act as purifiers. But all such wetlands surrounding the lake have ...
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Latest Mississippi River Delta News: May 19, 2015 19.5.2015 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
Where do Louisiana’s four major gubernatorial candidates stand on coastal sediment diversions? By Todd Masson, The Times-Picayune. May 18, 2015 “I'm not at all convinced that it's an either-or proposition, that you either have to protect the marsh as it is right now or do some diversions to make sure you stop the erosion that we have. The Master Plan that's in place was very well thought-out. It was driven by science." (Read More) Thousands living outside floodwalls fight for their own hurricane defenses By John Snell, WVUE. May 18, 2015 “Creppel points out dozens of plantations once lined the Mississippi River before man started re-engineering nature, robbing the wetlands of the river's life-giving sediment." (Read More) Work continues on building barrier strips of land from Plaquemines to Lafourche parishes; will soon help prevent flooding, storm surges By Amy Wold, The Advocate. May 19, 2015 “Efforts to build a barrier of coastal land from the west levee in Plaquemines Parish to the east levee in ...
Latest Mississippi River Delta News: May 18, 2015 18.5.2015 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
Pipeline moves Mississippi River sand to create 12-mile land bridge across three parishes By Mark Schleifstein, The Times-Picayune. May 15, 2015 “The flag-planting occurred about the eight-mile point in the project that's building a ridge and marsh platform out of sand dredged from the Mississippi River near the Phillips 66 Alliance Refinery south of Belle Chasse and pumped inland. For the past five years, segments of the project have deposited the ridge and marsh, as much as 3 1/2 feet above sea level, across Plaquemines Parish and into Jefferson Parish." (Read More) Coastal project could bring relief to one of La.’s most flood-prone communities By John Snell, WVUE. May 15, 2015 “A South Louisiana community with a chronic flooding problem stands to get a little extra protection, thanks to a long-distance delivery. A $66.1 million state and federal project under construction south of Lafitte aims to build or sustain 415 acres of wetlands and begin restoration of the Barataria Landbridge." (Read ...
Door County wetlands designated as globally significant 14.5.2015 Chicago Tribune: Nation
A wetlands area in northern Door County has been recognized as globally significant for protection under an international ...
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Enbridge to Fork Over $75 Million for Role in Kalamazoo Tar Sands Spill 13.5.2015 CommonDreams.org Headlines
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Heavy rain swamps parts of Houston area, vehicles abandoned 13.5.2015 Seattle Times: Nation & World
HOUSTON (AP) — Parts of Texas are being deluged by rain that’s caused flooding and led to water rescues in the Houston area, while officials in North Texas are taking the unusual step of releasing water from lakes to avoid banks from being breached. More than 9 inches of rain has fallen in the Houston […]
Deal reached between Michigan, company over 2010 oil spill 13.5.2015 Yahoo: US National
MARSHALL, Mich. (AP) — A company responsible for one of the largest inland oil spills in U.S. history will restore or create 300 acres of wetlands as part of a sweeping agreement to improve the Kalamazoo River watershed in southwestern Michigan, state officials said.
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