User: flenvcenter Topic: Water-National
Category: Water Quality :: Wetlands
Last updated: Apr 18 2014 05:11 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 4,823    
Nature Photographer James Balog Honored 18.4.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
This past weekend we bestowed the 2014 LEAF on James Balog. Balog the Leaper Balog is one of many talented and accomplished nature photographers that bring the images of flora and fauna, ocean and mountain to me and my fellow arm-chair naturalists. But I think Balog is unique. By melding his artistic sensibilities with his knowledge as an earth scientist and his love of the outdoors borne of youthful years spent mountain climbing and camping, Balog has created a body of work that is singular, informative and profoundly moving. During his visit, Balog related a story with a surprising turn of events, a turn that led him to find his life's work seemingly by accident and serendipity. As a young man, the now-consummate photographer did not consider photography as a possible future profession. He saw himself as a scientist and more specifically as an earth scientist. However, after publishing his first scientific paper and beginning to contemplate life after earning a master of science degree in geography ...
Also found in: [+]
It's Time to Drain the Swamp in Sacramento 17.4.2014 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
If the scandals involving California state senators Leland Yee , Ron Calderon , and Roderick Wright have proven anything it is that the existing system for the Senate to police the ethics of its own members has been an utter failure. The time has come to establish an independent legislative ethics commission, as even lobbyist George Steffes is saying . When Nancy Pelosi won a majority in the House of Representatives in the 2006 election, it was on a promise to drain the swamp. Exit polls from that election indicated that voters listed corruption and ethics as their number one issue, higher even than the war in Iraq -- scandals involving lobbyist Jack Abramoff, House Majority Leader Tom DeLay disgusted America, and made Pelosi the first female Speaker of the House. Pelosi made good on her promise by leading efforts to create the Office of Congressional Ethics (OCE), an independent agency housed within the Congress that could investigate ethics charges against members of Congress. While the OCE is not as ...
Also found in: [+]
Bicyclist dies five months after colliding with car at busy Menlo Park intersection 17.4.2014 San Jose Mercury News: Peninsula
A Facebook employee who was critically injured in November when his bicycle collided with a car at a busy Menlo Park intersection has died.
Restoring Louisiana's Coast Will Require Restoring Its Democracy -- Governor Jindal Is Trying to Undermine Both 17.4.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The Mississippi's River southernmost delta is home to a rich ecosystem, robust, culture and booming economy. Wetlands provide critical storm protection for the Louisiana's coast. A recent poll by America's Wetland Foundation found that 74 percent of Louisiana residents "consider saving the coast to be the most important issue [in the state] of our lifetime." For Delta citizens, flood protection is a matter of survival. Louisiana wetlands are disappearing at a rate of approximately 1 football field every hour and coastal communities are already washing into the Gulf of Mexico. To date, roughly 2,000 square miles of land have disappeared under water and the erosion is accelerating. The disappearing land once buffered communities including New Orleans from catastrophic storm surges. Managing the Mississippi River Delta is a daunting challenge, but the greatest barrier to restoration and flood protection is politics. Last year, a board of flood experts, acting to protect New Orleans, ignited a battle that ...
Also found in: [+]
Wisconsin jury breaks for day in husband's murder trial 16.4.2014 Twincities.com: Local

Jurors began deliberating Tuesday in the murder trial of a Lincoln County man accused of killing his wife and dumping her body in a swamp last year.

Biotransformation of Trace Organic Contaminants in Open-Water Unit Process Treatment Wetlands (Cached) 16.4.2014 pubs.acs.org

TOC Graphic

Environmental Science & Technology
DOI: 10.1021/es500351e
Also found in: [+]
One of the Smartest Investments We Can Make 16.4.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
By Jane Lubchenco, Former Administrator, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Mark R. Tercek, President and CEO, The Nature Conservancy This article first appeared on Ensia Online . For the past 25 years, every U.S. president beginning with George H. W. Bush has upheld a straightforward, three-word policy for protecting the nation's sensitive and valuable coastal wetlands: No Net Loss. And for a quarter of a century, we have failed in this country to achieve even that simple goal along our coasts. According to a recent report from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the United States is losing coastal wetlands at the staggering rate of 80,000 acres per year . That means on average the equivalent of seven American football fields of these ecosytems disappear into the ocean every hour of every day. On top of that, we're also losing vast expanses of sea-grass beds, oyster reefs and other coastal habitats that lie below the surface of coastal bays. This isn't just an ...
Also found in: [+]
Drinking quarry water in Burnsville and Savage 15.4.2014 Minnesota Public Radio: Science
Ten years ago, Kraemer Mining and Materials could see complications coming at its limestone quarry in Burnsville. Groundwater seeping into the quarry had to be pumped into the nearby Minnesota River -- more than 3 billion gallons a year. That posed am environmental that's been mitigated in a creative way.
Also found in: [+]
Missisquoi delta recognized as key wetland 14.4.2014 Boston Globe: Vermont
Vermont’s Missisquoi Bay delta and bay wetlands are being recognized as important wetlands by a global environmental treaty that deals with wetland ecosystems. The Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuges and Vermont’s Maquam, Carmen’s Marsh and Rock River wildlife management areas along the northeastern edge of Lake Champlain are receiving the recognition from the international Ramsar Convention on Wetlands. The designation is the first of its kind in Vermont, where the 7,665 acres site is the largest wetland complex in the Lake Champlain Basin. The US Fish and Wildlife Service says the Ramsar Convention is a 40-year-old treaty signed by some 160 countries to promote wetland and waterfowl conservation. There are currently 35 other designated US sites and 2,000 around the ...
Also found in: [+]
Swamp Wells Trail near Bend a secret cycling gem 14.4.2014 Seattle Times: Top stories
Spring trail biking offers scenery without crowds in Central Oregon.
Also found in: [+]
Missisquoi delta recognized as important wetland 14.4.2014 Boston Globe: Latest
Missisquoi delta recognized as important wetland
Also found in: [+]
Fire consuming marsh land in Fond du Lac County 11.4.2014 Star Tribune: Local
Also found in: [+]
Nearly Four Years After The BP Oil Spill, Long-Term Health Impacts Remain Unclear 11.4.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
CHALMETTE, La. (AP) — When a BP oil well began gushing crude into the Gulf of Mexico four years ago, fisherman George Barisich used his boat to help clean up the millions of gallons that spewed in what would become the worst offshore spill in U.S. history. Like so many Gulf Coast residents who pitched in after the April 20, 2010, explosion of the Deepwater Horizon rig, Barisich was motivated by a desire to help and a need to make money — the oil had destroyed his livelihood. Today he regrets that decision, and worries his life has been permanently altered. Barisich, 58, says respiratory problems he developed during the cleanup turned into pneumonia and that his health has never been the same. "After that, I found out that I couldn't run. I couldn't exert past a walk," he said. His doctor declined to comment. Barisich is among thousands considering claims under a medical settlement BP reached with cleanup workers and coastal residents. The settlement, which could benefit an estimated 200,000 people, ...
Also found in: [+]
St. Louis River estuary 'cleanup' ignores the source of the toxic mess 10.4.2014 MinnPost
CC/Flickr/Mr. Nixter If the St. Louis River is to be cleaned up, responsible agencies must oversee the entire watershed. In its April newsletter, the Natural Resource Research Institute (NRRI) at the University of Minnesota, Duluth, touted its role in new efforts to clean up the St. Louis River estuary. The newsletter lists past damage to the estuary including wood waste, PCBs, mercury, filling of wetlands and harm to life within the habitat. Anne Stewart However, cleaning up polluting sources at its mouth will not save the river unless the entire watershed is protected. NRRI’s activities at the river’s terminus are at odds with its activities at the headwaters, where NRRI geologists and economists actively promote copper mining. Dean M. Peterson , a UMD geologist, is also an officer of Duluth Metals, a company developing the Twin Metals mining operation near Ely.  The St. Louis River, pristine at its source at Seven Beavers Lake in the Superior National Forest, flows westward through a wetlands area ...
Also found in: [+]
St. Louis Park restoration is changing stretch of Minnehaha Creek 10.4.2014 Star Tribune: Local
St. Louis Park restoration is changing Minnehaha Creek.
Also found in: [+]
Pop-up wetlands help California farmers and migratory birds 9.4.2014 TreeHugger
An innovative conservation technique is paying farms to flood their fields and create temporary habitat for birds traveling along the Pacific Flyway.
Also found in: [+]
Out in the Open: The Free Code That Lets You Build Your Own Siri 9.4.2014 Wired Top Stories
In the Iron Man movies, Tony Starks uses a voice-controlled computer assistant called J.A.R.V.I.S. It manages the lights and security system in his home, helps him pilot his Iron Man suits, and even assists with his research. Some of this is still very much in the realm of science fiction, but not all of it. ...
Fresh looks at 'creeping ecological disaster' of U.S. grassland conversions 8.4.2014 MinnPost
From the American Prospect comes a fine piece of enterprise journalism on the shocking rates at which native grasslands are being converted to row crops in a region stretching from western Minnesota across the Dakotas, Nebraska and Iowa. "Plowed Under," written by Jocelyn C. Zuckerman and published last week with support from the Food & Environment Reporting Network , takes the reader on a tour of perhaps familiar terrain where losses of natural landscapes and plant communities are leading to soil erosion, degrading water quality, habitat destruction and more — often with the strong support of federal farm policies. This is not a new trend but clearly an accelerating and also, I think, a significantly under-reported one. Last November, the Associated Press touched on grassland losses in its investigation of unintended environmental harm said to be flowing from federal promotion of biofuels. This aspect was one of the project's major strengths, as I said at the time , but the focus was on policies thought ...
Also found in: [+]
“Model hospital” for privatized African health care threatens to swamp country’s budget 7.4.2014 Oxfam International RSS main feed
A new privately-run hospital supported by the World Bank’s private sector arm, the IFC, is threatening to bankrupt the health budget of Lesotho, one of the poorest and least-healthy countries in the world. IFC-supported private hospital project eating up 51% of Lesotho’s health budget A new privately-run hospital supported by the World Bank’s private sector arm, the IFC, is threatening to bankrupt the health budget of one of the poorest and least-healthy countries in the world. The Queen Mamohato Memorial Hospital in Lesotho is the first of its kind in any low-income country in the world – built, financed and run entirely as a “public-private partnership.” The IFC considers it one of the flagships for the future of African health care. It is now advising on similar projects in Benin and Nigeria. In a report today, “ A Dangerous Diversion ”, Oxfam and the Lesotho Consumer Protection Association (LCPA) say that the running and loan costs of the three-year-old hospital complex in the capital Maseru have ...
Also found in: [+]
Rare Myanmar ecosystems protected only on paper 5.4.2014 AP Top News
LAMPI ISLAND, Myanmar (AP) -- Off a remote, glimmering beach backed by a lush tropical forest, Julia Tedesco skims the crystalline waters with mask and fins, looking for coral and fish life....
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 4,823