User: flenvcenter Topic: Water-National
Category: Resource Management :: Conservation
Last updated: Oct 19 2017 21:42 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Our Summer of Fire and the Fires to Come 19.10.2017 Truthout - All Articles
A helicopter prepares to drop water on a fire that threatens the Oakmont community along Highway 12 in Santa Rosa on October 13, 2017. Early morning mandatory evacuations happened on Adobe Canyon Road and Calistoga Rd. (Photo: Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images) Out-of-control wildfires have devastated the Western US this year, causing not only immediate deaths and untold property damage, but dangerous levels of smoke pollution and long-term health effects. The impact of wildfires on human health and ecosystems will keep rising, unless serious and emergency measures are taken to counter climate change and its effects. A helicopter prepares to drop water on a fire that threatens the Oakmont community along Highway 12 in Santa Rosa on October 13, 2017. Early morning mandatory evacuations happened on Adobe Canyon Road and Calistoga Rd. (Photo: Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images) Explosive wildfires have raged in Northern California over the last two weeks.  Forty-one people ...
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Moving Beyond ‘Take, Make, Waste’: Developing Cities Show the Possibilities of the Circular Economy 4.10.2017 THE CITY FIX
By 2050, the global population is expected to soar beyond 9 billion people, 66 percent of whom may live in cities. Accompanying this stunning pace of urbanization will be a complex web of challenges related to consumption, pollution and water and energy stresses. Recently, ...
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Moving Beyond “Take, Make, Waste”: Developing Cities Show the Possibilities of the Circular Economy 2.10.2017 WRI Stories
Moving Beyond “Take, Make, Waste”: Developing Cities Show the Possibilities of the Circular Economy Comments|Add Comment|PrintSidewalk shoe-repair stands. Photo by Panoramio/Wikimedia By 2050, the global population is expected to soar beyond 9 billion people, 66 percent of whom may live in cities. Accompanying this stunning pace of urbanization will be a complex web of challenges related to consumption, pollution, and water and energy stresses. Recently, the concept of a circular economy has... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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Climate Disruption Could Pose "Existential Threat" By 2050 2.10.2017 Truthout - All Articles
(Photo: Billy Wilson ; Edited: LW / TO) Human-forced global warming is unraveling Earth: We've changed the composition of the atmosphere, acidified the oceans and caused massive ice melt. As epic rains warp Earth's crust and tree-killing beetles follow warmer temperatures northwards, scientists warn of an "existential threat" to humanity as early as 2050 as planetary heating continues apace. (Photo: Billy Wilson ; Edited: LW / TO)   This story was published because of support from readers like you. If you care about maintaining a free and independent media, make a donation to Truthout! It is often painful to write these monthly dispatches, chronicling what has happened to the Earth over the previous several weeks. Every month I'm taken aback by how rapidly the changes are unfolding. Take my word for this: These pieces are as emotionally challenging for me to write as they are for you to read. Over the several years I've been producing these climate disruption dispatches, I've mostly received messages of ...
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Climate Change Refugees Face Militarized Borders 1.10.2017 Truthout.com
Rising seas and raging hurricanes could destroy your town. Drought and mudslides could destroy your livelihood. But none of that matters to those empowered to control a nation-state's territorial boundaries, says author Todd Miller whose book, Storming the Wall, looks at corporate border militarization against climate refugees and the emerging movements for environmental justice. A US Border Patrol agent scans the US-Mexico border while on a bridge over the Rio Grande on March 13, 2017, in Roma, Texas. "In the eyes of the nation-state, a person migrating because of climate reasons is meaningless," says author and journalist Todd Miller. (Photo: John Moore / Getty Images) As more and more climate-ravaged communities are forced to relocate by droughts, floods and superstorms, the business of fortifying borders is booming. In his new book, Storming the Wall: Climate Change, Migration, and Homeland Security, Todd Miller travels around the world reporting on the corporate border militarization cash grab, and ...
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How Military Outsourcing Turned Toxic 30.9.2017 Truthout.com
US B-52 bombers stand ready March 5, 2003 at Barksdale Air Force Base in Louisiana. (Photo: Mario Villafuerte / Getty Images) In August 2016, an inspector from the US Environmental Protection Agency arrived at Barksdale Air Force base in Louisiana, a nerve center for the US military's global air combat operations, to conduct a routine look at the base's handling of its hazardous waste. Barksdale, like many military bases, generates large volumes of hazardous materials , including thousands of pounds of toxic powder left over from cleaning, painting and maintaining airplanes. For years, Barksdale had been sending a portion of its waste to an Ohio company, US Technology Corp., that had sold officials at the base on a seemingly ingenious solution for disposing of it: The company would take the contaminated powder from refurbished war planes and repurpose it into cinderblocks that would be used to build everything from schools to hotels to big-box department stores -- even a pregnancy support center in Ohio. ...
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Experts weigh in: we need to learn about chemicals in oilfield wastewater before reusing it outside the oilfield 29.9.2017 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
By Dan Mueller Oil and gas companies are looking for new ways to reuse salty, toxic wastewater — including crop irrigation. A recent publication of the Air and Waste Management Association (AMWA) contained a number of articles by academia and industry experts about the many challenges of managing the nearly 900 billion gallons of wastewater (also called produced water) generated every year by oil and gas production. This wastewater is not only very salty but also contains a number of chemicals (many toxic) and potentially radioactive material. The majority of this wastewater is disposed in deep underground wells to minimize the risks of it coming into contact with humans or the environment (though leaks and spills at the surface are still a big concern). But in hope of lowering costs, in recent years industry has been trending toward finding other ways to either dispose of or recycle this waste – in part because demand for water resources is increasing in drought prone areas and because disposal wells ...
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U.S. and Mexico may be at odds, but they've reached agreement on managing the Colorado River 28.9.2017 LA Times: Environment

The United States and Mexico expanded a long-term agreement Wednesday that will allow both nations to continue using the Colorado River while also pushing more conservation efforts to ensure that water is available during droughts.

The nine-year deal, which expands on a 1944 water treaty between...

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U.S., Mexico may be at odds, but they've reached agreement on managing the Colorado River 28.9.2017 LA Times: Nation

The United States and Mexico expanded a long-term agreement Wednesday that will allow both nations to continue using the Colorado River while also pushing more conservation efforts to ensure that water is available during droughts.

The nine-year deal, which expands on a 1944 water treaty between...

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What innovation looks like when water is a strategic resource 27.9.2017 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Learning from Israel's leadership.
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Water Stress is Driving Conflict and Migration. How Should the Global Community Respond? 25.9.2017 WRI Stories
Water Stress is Driving Conflict and Migration. How Should the Global Community Respond?Add Comment|PrintDrought in Rajasthan, India. Flickr/Austin Yoder Water insecurity has driven social distress throughout history, from the Mayan Empire to modern-day Syria. But global efforts to avoid crises have been inadequate. There's a better path forward. My Commentary discusses the state of current water hotspots, and explains why and how we need to act with urgency on water issues. Water experts... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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In parched North Dakota, cloud-seeding irks some farmers 24.9.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

FARGO, N.D. (AP) — In the parched northern Plains, where the worst drought in decades has withered crops and forced some ranchers to begin selling off their herds, a cloud-seeding program aimed at making it rain would seem a strange target for farmer anger. But some North Dakota growers are trying to end a state […]
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Implement work plan to tackle drought promptly : PR Minister 20.9.2017 Central Chronicle
Bhopal : Public Relations, Water Resources and Parliamentary Affairs Minister Dr. Narottam Mishra today apprised... more »
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Declare Bhopal drought hit : Kisan Morcha 20.9.2017 Central Chronicle
Bhopal : Many tehsils of 36 districts of state, including Bhopal, are drought hit due... more »
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What to do with old cooking oil 14.9.2017 TreeHugger
Here are some suggestions that will, hopefully, prevent the formation of future fatbergs.
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Water Conservation Can Have Unintended Consequences 14.9.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
Conventional wisdom dictates water conservation can only benefit communities affected by drought. But researchers at the University of California, Riverside have deduced that indoor residential conservation can have unintended consequences in places where systems of wastewater reuse have already been implemented, diminishing both the quantity and quality of influent available for treatment.
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Chhattisgarh: 96 tehsils in 21 districts declared drought-hit 13.9.2017 India – The Indian Express
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A Venice homeowner removed the lawn and replaced it with this colorful landscape 13.9.2017 LA Times: Commentary
A former lawn in Venice is now a low-water, low-maintenance landscape.
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China's 'sponge cities' aim to reuse most rainwater 11.9.2017 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
It's an ambitious plan to arrest urban flooding, but can it overcome local constraints?
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Climate change deepens Portugal’s drought problems 11.9.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

SANTA SUSANA, Portugal (AP) — Portugal’s Pego do Altar reservoir looks like disused quarry now, its bare, exposed slopes rising up steeply on each side as it holds barely 11 percent of the water it was designed for. While parts of the United States and the Caribbean are drowning in water amid ferocious hurricanes, a […]
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