User: flenvcenter Topic: Water-National
Category: Resource Management :: Conservation
Last updated: Dec 16 2017 06:57 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Thomas fire could surpass 1889 Santiago Canyon fire, believed to be California's largest 16.12.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Ever since the Thomas fire erupted Dec. 4, it has steadily burned its way up the list of California’s largest wildfires since the Great Depression.

That list however does not include what some consider to be California’s largest known wildfire — the 1889 Santiago Canyon fire, which scorched 300,000...

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Study: Loss of water in drought caused Sierra Nevada to rise 14.12.2017 AP National
LOS ANGELES (AP) -- Loss of water from rocks during drought caused California's Sierra Nevada to rise nearly an inch (2.5 centimeters) in height from October 2011 to October 2015, according to a new NASA study made public Wednesday....
Water loss caused Sierra Nevada to grow an inch during California drought, researchers say 14.12.2017 LA Times: Commentary

The Sierra Nevada mountains grew nearly an inch taller during the recent drought and shrank by half an inch when water and snow returned to the area, according to new research from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge.

Researchers used 1,300 GPS stations throughout the mountain...

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Why are California's wildfires so historic? For starters, a diablo is at work. 13.12.2017 Washington Post
Why are California's wildfires so historic? For starters, a diablo is at work.
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Scientists unveil new satellite-based global drought severity index 12.12.2017 Environmental News Network
Enhanced monitoring tool adds groundwater storage to assessment factors
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Promising to ‘Make Our Planet Great Again,’ Macron lures 13 U.S. climate scientists to France with grants 12.12.2017 Washington Post
The awarding of the research grants comes as the Trump administration has proposed slashing federal science budgets and has dropped out of the Paris climate accord.
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The Era of Walls: Greeting Climate-Change Victims With a Man-Made Dystopia 7.12.2017 Truthout.com
(Photo: Alan Levine ; Edited: LW / TO)   In times of great injustice, independent media is crucial to fighting back against misinformation. Support grassroots journalism: Make a donation to Truthout. When I first talked to the three Honduran men in the train yard in the southern Mexican town of Tenosique, I had no idea that they were climate-change refugees. We were 20 miles from the border with Guatemala at a rail yard where Central American refugees often congregated to try to board La Bestia ("the Beast"), the nickname given to the infamous train that has proven so deadly for those traveling north toward the United States. The men hid momentarily as a Mexican army truck with masked, heavily armed soldiers drove by. Given Washington's  pressure  on Mexico to fortify its southern border, US Border Patrol agents might have trained those very soldiers. As soon as they were gone, the Hondurans told me that they had been stuck here for six long days. The night before, they had tried to jump on La Bestia, ...
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Fires, droughts and hurricanes: What's the link between climate change and natural disasters? 6.12.2017 LA Times: Science
Hurricanes, wildfires and other natural disasters seem to be getting more severe. Here's how they may be linked with climate change.
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A new NOAA tool is helping to predict US droughts, global famine 5.12.2017 Environmental News Network
Agriculture is the economic engine that powers the Great Plains, the vast stretch of treeless prairie that covers parts of 10 states – and where the next drought can appear with little warning.Now there’s a powerful new tool to help provide farmers and ranchers in the arid western United States critical early indications of oncoming droughts, and its name is EDDI.
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La Nina contributes to wildfire threat in mid-South, Plains 3.12.2017 AP National
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) -- Conditions are ripe for winter wildfires from the mid-South through the Great Plains thanks to a combination of weather factors, including the climate phenomenon known as La Nina, that have left a lot of dry growth....
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Genes Found in Drought-Resistant Plants Could Accelerate Evolution of Water-Use Efficient Crops 1.12.2017 Green Technology and Environmental Science News - ENN
Scientists at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have identified a common set of genes that enable different drought-resistant plants to survive in semi-arid conditions, which could play a significant role in bioengineering and creating energy crops that are tolerant to water deficits.
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15 trampled to death in stampede for flour in drought-stricken Morocco 20.11.2017 Washington Post
15 trampled to death in stampede for flour in drought-stricken Morocco
Delhi government to deliver 40 public services at doorstep from 2018 16.11.2017 Delhi – The Indian Express
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It's America Recycles Day, the annual celebration of a culture of disposability 15.11.2017 TreeHugger
And now, a word from our sponsors, big plastic.
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Here’s What Climate Change Is Doing to the West 14.11.2017 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by High Country News and appears here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.  The complexity of climate change means it’s hard to trace simple lines from cause to effect in daily life, much less plan for the future. That’s one reason the federal government updates its National Climate Assessment every four years—to provide […]
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Some Coal Ash from China Too Radioactive for Reuse 10.11.2017 Environmental News Network
Manufacturers are increasingly using encapsulated coal ash from power plants as a low-cost binding agent in concrete, wallboard, bricks, roofing and other building materials. But a new study by U.S. and Chinese scientists cautions that coal ash from high-uranium deposits in China may be too radioactive for this use.
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Atmospheric rivers could increase flood risk by 80 per cent 9.11.2017 Environmental News Network
The global effect and impact of atmospheric rivers on rainfall, flooding and droughts has been estimated for the first time – revealing that in some regions the risks can be enhanced by up to 80 percent. The work, of which Oxford University is a key partner, also considers the number of people affected by these atmospheric phenomena across the globe.
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In the Water-Scarce Southwest, an Ancient Irrigation System Disrupts Big Agriculture 7.11.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Choose journalism that empowers movements for social, environmental and economic justice: Support the independent media at Truthout! Water in the American Southwest has never been abundant. Its availability fluctuates depending on conditions like drought and mountain snowpack that feeds streams and rivers. But  experts  predict a future of greater extremes: longer and hotter heat waves in the summer, less precipitation, decreased snowpack, and more severe and frequent droughts that will place greater stress on water users. In  New Mexico  and  Colorado , legal statutes enable an area's original water users to transfer their portions of the resource, via pipelines, to the highest bidder virtually anywhere in the state. When scarcity hits, industrial mining and agricultural operations can afford to purchase additional water while small-scale farmers and ranchers remain vulnerable; in both states, water use already exceeds availability. But for over a century, acequias -- an ancient form of community water ...
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Water shortages parch Moroccan towns, prompt protests 5.11.2017 AP Business
MARRAKECH, Morocco (AP) -- Taps are running dry in southern Morocco, and the government is searching for solutions after people took to parched streets in anger....
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Everything you need to know about climate tipping points 1.11.2017 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
By Casey Ivanovich (This post was co-authored by EDF Climate Scientist Ilissa Ocko ) Imagine cutting down a tree. Initially, you chop and chop … but not much seems to change. Then suddenly, one stroke of the hatchet frees the trunk from its base and the once distant leaves come crashing down. It’s an apt metaphor for one of the most alarming aspects of climate change – the existence of “tipping elements.” These elements are components of the climate that may pass a critical threshold, or “tipping point,” after which a tiny change can completely alter the state of the system. Moving past tipping points may incite catastrophes ranging from widespread drought to overwhelming sea level rise. Which elements’ critical thresholds should we worry about passing thanks to human-induced climate change ? You can see the answer on this graphic – and find more information below. The most immediate and most worrisome threats Disappearance of Arctic Summer Sea Ice – As the Arctic warms, sea ice melts and exposes dark ...
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