User: flenvcenter Topic: Water-National
Category: Resource Management :: Irrigation
Last updated: Dec 20 2014 21:49 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 3,418    
Citysens is a chic hydroponic vertical garden that grows air-cleaning plants (Video) 20.12.2014 TreeHugger
Lacking space or gardening skills? This stacking hydroponic garden could help you get more green into your space.
Also found in: [+]
Feds announce first regulations for toxic coal ash 20.12.2014 LA Times: Environment
Six years after a catastrophic coal ash spill in Tennessee washed away homes and polluted rivers, the Environmental Protection Agency on Friday announced the first federal regulations for the toxic wastes created by coal burned to produce electricity.
Also found in: [+]
Climate Change Could Cause 18 Percent Drop In Food Production By 2050, Study Says 18.12.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
ROME, Dec 18 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Global warming could cause an 18 percent drop in world food production by 2050, but investments in irrigation and infrastructure, and moving food output to different regions, could reduce the loss, a study published on Thursday said. Globally, irrigation systems should be expanded by more than 25 percent to cope with changing rainfall patterns, the study published in the journal Environmental Research Letters said. Where they should be expanded is difficult to model because of competing scenarios on how rainfall will change, so the majority of irrigation investments should be made after 2030, the study said. "If you don't carefully plan (where to spend resources), you will get adaptation wrong," David Leclere, one of the study's authors, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation. Infrastructure and processing chains will need to be built in areas where there was little agriculture before in order to expand production, he said. International food markets ...
Also found in: [+]
Wetting and Drying: Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Saving Water from Rice Production 17.12.2014 WRI Stories
Installment 8 of Creating a Sustainable Food Future explores the potential to improve water management in rice production in order to reduce agricultural greenhouse gas emissions and save water. Through a series of case studies, we examine the opportunities and challenges of mitigating emissions through water management, and close with a series of recommendations for how to scale up adoption of improved water management techniques in rice production. [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
Also found in: [+]
More Rice, Less Methane 17.12.2014 WRI Stories
Rice is the nutritious staple crop for more than half of the world’s people, but growing rice produces methane, a greenhouse gas more than 30 times as potent as carbon dioxide. Methane from rice contributes around 1.5 percent of total global greenhouse gas emissions, and could grow substantially. That may not sound like a lot, but agriculture as a whole contributes around one quarter of all emissions. Effectively tackling climate change could require cutting agricultural emissions by two-thirds... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
Also found in: [+]
Wall Street’s brain drain on the economy 17.12.2014 Washington Post
NEW YORK — The thing Deborah Jackson remembers from her first interviews at Goldman Sachs is the slogan. It was stamped on the glass doors of the offices in the investment bank’s headquarters just off Wall Street, the lure of the place in two words, eight syllables: “Uncommon capability.”Read full article >>
Also found in: [+]
Crews work to fix 12-inch water main break in downtown D.C. that snarled commute 16.12.2014 Washington Post
A 12-inch water main break in downtown D.C. caused headaches for thousands of commuters Tuesday morning, shutting down part of three Metrorail lines.The pipe that broke was under 12th Street NW between E and F streets. The break was reported about 6 a.m. and caused water to gush into the streets. Water poured through a gutter gate on the northbound side of 12th Street, causing flooding on the tracks at the Metro Center station directly below.Read full article ...
Earthquake could imperil L.A.'s water supply 16.12.2014 LA Times: Top News
Also found in: [+]
Desalination out of Desperation 16.12.2014 Technology Review Feed - Tech Review Top Stories

Severe droughts are forcing researchers to rethink how technology can increase the supply of fresh water.

Even in drought-stricken California, San Diego stands out. It gets less rain than parched Los Angeles or Fresno. The region has less groundwater than many other parts of the state. And more than 80 percent of water for homes and businesses is imported from sources that are increasingly stressed. The Colorado River is so overtaxed that it rarely reaches the sea; water originating in the Sacramento River delta, more than 400 miles north, was rationed by state officials this year, cutting off some farmers in California’s Central Valley from their main source of irrigation. San Diego County, hot, dry, and increasingly populous, offers a preview of where much of the world is headed. So too does a recent decision by the county government: it is building the largest seawater desalination plant in the Western Hemisphere, at a cost of $1 billion.

Also found in: [+]
Keystone XL pipeline may no longer make economic sense, experts say 15.12.2014 LA Times: Nation
Amid the shouting on Capitol Hill, the wads of campaign cash and the activist careers shaped around the Keystone XL pipeline, the project at the flashpoint of America's energy debate now confronts a problem bigger than politics.
Also found in: [+]
Tiny water district to seize PG&E power lines, transformers 13.12.2014 SFGate: Business & Technology
The South San Joaquin Irrigation District won permission from a key government panel Thursday to jump into the retail electricity business, selling power to 38,000 residents of Escalon, Manteca, Ripon and the surrounding countryside. To do it, the district plans to seize every power line, transformer and pole owned by Pacific Gas and Electric Co. across a swath of San Joaquin County, either through a friendly sale or via eminent domain. In 2006, the county’s Local Agency Formation Commission, which sets the boundaries of towns and districts, rejected the irrigation district’s plan, saying there wasn’t enough information to prove it would work. [...] on Thursday, the panel reversed itself, voting 4-1 to let the district start retail electricity sales — provided it can meet its goal of beating PG&E’s electricity rates by 15 percent. “We have maintained that (the irrigation district’s) plan poses significant risks to the safety, reliability and affordability of retail electric service for our ...
Also found in: [+]
Holidazzle Holiday Market After Water Pipe Break 9.12.2014 WCCO: Local News
(credit: CBS)The Holidazzle Holiday Market in downtown Minneapolis will be back open Tuesday after being shut down. The shops in downtown Minneapolis were forced to close Monday after a nearby water pipe break. Crews worked overnight to clear about four to five inches of standing water.
The Hidden Hand Behind "Natural" Disasters 9.12.2014 International Rivers News RSS Feed
By:  Peter Bosshard Floods and droughts in many parts of the world are getting ever more frequent and intense. Scientists have long warned that a changing climate is making such weather events more extreme. What is often neglected in the public debate is that the impacts of climate change on flood and drought disasters are exacerbated by environmental destruction. A new report by Wetlands International argues that "damaged ecosystems are the hidden hand behind many supposedly natural disasters. They can be what turns extreme weather into human calamity." The new report, Downstream Voices, was authored by the eminent environmental journalist Fred Pearce. With case studies from India, Mali and Senegal, Downstream Voices documents how the degradation of wetlands and rivers compounds the impacts of climate change. Embankments separate rivers from the floodplains which they used to nourish, and stop floods from receding when they inevitably topple or breach the human-made barriers. Dams divert water into ...
Also found in: [+]
The Hidden Hand Behind "Natural" Disasters 9.12.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Floods and droughts in many parts of the world are getting ever more frequent and intense. Scientists have long warned that a changing climate is making such weather events more extreme. What is often neglected in the public debate is that the impacts of climate change on flood and drought disasters are exacerbated by environmental destruction. A new report by Wetlands International argues that "damaged ecosystems are the hidden hand behind many supposedly natural disasters. They can be what turns extreme weather into human calamity." The new report, Downstream Voices, was authored by the eminent environmental journalist Fred Pearce. With case studies from India, Mali and Senegal, Downstream Voices documents how the degradation of wetlands and rivers compounds the impacts of climate change. Embankments separate rivers from the floodplains which they used to nourish, and stop floods from receding when they inevitably topple or breach the human-made barriers. Dams divert water into commercial irrigation ...
Also found in: [+]
This intelligent water leak detection system turns off your water if a pipe bursts 6.12.2014 TreeHugger
Water Hero protects your home against burst pipes, slow leaks, and long showers.
Also found in: [+]
Hugels, swales offer DIY rainwater catchment options 3.12.2014 LA Times: Top News
Also found in: [+]
How 4 Mexican Immigrant Kids and Their Cheap Robot Beat MIT 2.12.2014 Wired Top Stories
A WIRED Classic: How four underdogs from the mean streets of Phoenix took on the best from M.I.T. in the national underwater bot ...
Also found in: [+]
In affluent areas of California, water use remains high even in drought 30.11.2014 Seattle Times: Nation & World
Residents of the Santa Fe Irrigation District in California used an average of 584 gallons of water a day, nearly five times the average for coastal Southern California. Although drought has blanketed the entire state, the burdens of the dry reservoirs have hardly been spread evenly.
Also found in: [+]
Election win puts rural San Benito County on anti-fracking map 29.11.2014 LA Times: Opinion
If you were plotting the epicenter of a daring trend or gathering the vanguard for a revolutionary charge, San Benito County might not be the first place you'd start.
Also found in: [+]
Something To Be Thankful For: Growing Cranberries Sustainably 27.11.2014 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
It's Saturday morning in Plympton, Mass., and the sun has yet to dry the dew from the windows at the Mayflower Cranberries farm, but owner Jeff LaFleur is already on a knee in his bog inspecting his crimson bounty in preparation for the fall harvest. "It's a pretty big berry, as you can see it here set on the vine," LaFleur says, breaking off a couple berries that rival the size of California-grown grapes. "Try one. They're a little bitter, but these are sweeter than a lot of the other varieties." Sweet indeed. The fall harvest season at Mayflower Cranberries, home to the first commercial cranberry bog in Plympton, is a scene that truly captures the essence of the Thanksgiving holiday. Cranberries have been cultivated in the bogs of Southeastern Massachusetts since 1816, according to Cohasset, Mass., author Susan Playfair's new book , America's Founding Fruit: the Cranberry in a New Environment. At Mayflower Cranberries , LaFleur has vines in his Brown Swamp Bog that date to the late 1800s and are still ...
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 3,418