User: flenvcenter Topic: Water-National
Category: Resource Management :: Irrigation
Last updated: Dec 17 2017 02:54 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Rising groundwater damaging northeast Colorado homes 17.12.2017 Denver Post: Local
The PVC pipe snaking alongside Joanne Maes' house gives a little shudder, then two gurgles and a splash.
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On tapes of fatal blaze, firefighters report water problems 16.12.2017 Philly.com News
Shortly before the fire that killed four at the senior citizens facility, Aqua announced plans to replace the six-inch water main in front of the home. Firefighters complained about a lack of water pressure during the blaze.
Wisconsin on the verge of taking an important step to replacing its lead pipes 6.12.2017 Nanotechnology Notes
Tom Neltner, J.D., is Chemicals Policy Director In 2012, Madison, Wisconsin became the first city in the country to fully eliminate its lead service lines (LSLs), the lead pipes that connect the drinking water main under the street to interior plumbing. The project to replace its 8,000 known LSLs began in 2000. The City’s effort is […]
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Oakdale officials discover leak in pipe that likely led to I-694 closure 6.12.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
A water main that broke last weekend and forced the closure of a portion of I-694 appeared to have a slight leak before the break, Oakdale officials said Tuesday.
River connectivity needed similar to power grids, says Nitin Gadkari 5.12.2017 India – The Indian Express
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Small towns face a 'crisis' of aging water, sewer pipes 5.12.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Water and sewer pipes are reaching the end of their expected life spans in many places across Minnesota, and there's not enough state or federal funding to meet the needs -- especially for small cities.
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Maharashtra: Water resources ministry gets nod for separate manual 5.12.2017 India – The Indian Express
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Many Minnesota homes would benefit from an energy audit 1.12.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Business
Energy bills are poised to rise as temperatures fall. Minnesotans can ease the financial pain by checking the insulation in their home and looking for ways they can update around the house. And the Minnesota Center for Energy and the Environment wants to help.
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Margate beach work could disrupt next summer too, says Army Corps 30.11.2017 Philly.com News
This beach town whose citizens suffered through a summer of disruption and pop up beach lakes due to beach replenishment it did not want could be in for a second round.
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Michigan wants all lead pipes replaced within 20 years 29.11.2017 AP National
LANSING, Mich. (AP) -- Gov. Rick Snyder's administration is planning to require the replacement of every underground lead service pipe in Michigan within 20 years while delaying by four years a deadline to implement the nation's toughest lead limit for drinking water, in the wake of the Flint lead crisis....
Mexico promised affordable housing for all. Instead it created many rapidly decaying slums 26.11.2017 LA Times: Commentary

Sixteen years ago, Mexico embarked on a monumental campaign to elevate living standards for its working-class masses.

The government teamed with private developers to launch the largest residential construction boom in Latin American history. Global investors — the World Bank, big foundations,...

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To avoid 'fatbergs,' keep grease, wipes out of sewer 23.11.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Minnesota hasn't yet had any monster fatbergs, or giant globs of fat and grease mixed with disposable wipes that can wreak havoc on a city. But they're still causing plenty of problems for sewer systems around the state.
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In the Water-Scarce Southwest, an Ancient Irrigation System Disrupts Big Agriculture 7.11.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Choose journalism that empowers movements for social, environmental and economic justice: Support the independent media at Truthout! Water in the American Southwest has never been abundant. Its availability fluctuates depending on conditions like drought and mountain snowpack that feeds streams and rivers. But  experts  predict a future of greater extremes: longer and hotter heat waves in the summer, less precipitation, decreased snowpack, and more severe and frequent droughts that will place greater stress on water users. In  New Mexico  and  Colorado , legal statutes enable an area's original water users to transfer their portions of the resource, via pipelines, to the highest bidder virtually anywhere in the state. When scarcity hits, industrial mining and agricultural operations can afford to purchase additional water while small-scale farmers and ranchers remain vulnerable; in both states, water use already exceeds availability. But for over a century, acequias -- an ancient form of community water ...
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Demystifying the complex world of water: Your questions, answered 7.11.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
You ask, we answer. Here are five of your questions related to water, answered by MPR News reporters.
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Big Oil Has A Diversity Problem 5.11.2017 NPR News
The business wants to attract more women and minorities, but a history of racism and sexism makes that difficult.
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Bhavantar Bhugtan Yojana to be continued: Farmers must not come in any one’s entrapment 2.11.2017 Central Chronicle » Bhopal
Staff Reporter, Bhopal Chief Minister Shivraj Singh Chouhan said that Bhavantar Bhugtan Yojana will be... more »
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He keeps Reading Terminal's pipes running - and played drums with Jimmy Buffett 1.11.2017 Philly.com News
"There were a lot of Coronas," he said.
Coal burying Goa: Solutions in the air- slurry pipe, sealed trucks, wagons 1.11.2017 Front Page – The Indian Express
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Urban heat and cool island effects controlled by agriculture and irrigation 26.10.2017 Environmental News Network
As Earth’s climate continues to warm, the urban heat island effect raises concerns that city-dwellers will suffer more heat stress than their rural counterparts. However, new research suggests that some cities actually experience a cooling effect. More than 60 percent of urban areas in India experience a day-time cooling effect, according to the study, which was published in Scientific Reports. The cooling effect has been observed in the past, but this paper is the first to directly identify a cause: lack of moisture and vegetation in non-urban areas surrounding the city.
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Pasadena vs. L.A. in a fight for purple-pipe water 18.10.2017 Science / Technology News

Two years ago this past summer, I spread the good word in this space about the possibility of using recycled water to irrigate the thirstiest part of Pasadena: The fairways and greens of the 36 holes of the Brookside Golf Courses in the Arroyo Seco. As I noted at the time, that filtered water is currently held in a reservoir near Scholl Canyon Landfill in Glendale.

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