User: flenvcenter Topic: Water-National
Category: Resource Management :: Irrigation
Last updated: Aug 16 2017 01:39 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Water-main work to snarl traffic on Colesville Road in Silver Spring for almost two years 16.8.2017 Washington Post
Water-main work to snarl traffic on Colesville Road in Silver Spring for almost two years
Should you warn your guests? An Army Corps beach etiquette guide 15.8.2017 Philly.com News
Things can get tricky when the Army Corps of Engineers comes unannounced. Here is our guide to best etiquette while the Army Corps is at your front beach door.
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Family sues PSE, saying daughter, 18, was electrocuted while tubing the Puyallup River 8.8.2017 Seattle Times: Local

While Madeline "Maddy" Roskie was floating down the river with her boyfriend, her legs went numb, then within seconds she fell unconscious, a lawsuit alleges.
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Melting glaciers leave a flood of problems for Peru 8.8.2017 Washington Post
The country is home to 70 percent of the world’s “tropical glaciers,” or small, high-altitude ice caps found at the Earth’s middle latitudes. Their disappearance has made Peru something of a laboratory for human adaptation to climate change. So far, it’s not going very well.
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Peru’s glaciers have made it a laboratory for adapting to climate change. It’s not going well. 7.8.2017 Washington Post: World
As South American country's glaciers melt, its problems are only beginning.
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Fourteen communities set goal of replacing more than 240,000 lead pipes and 19 take important steps forward 7.8.2017 Nanotechnology Notes
Tom Neltner, J.D., Chemicals Policy Director and Sam Lovell, Project Specialist An estimated 6 to 10 million homes in the US still get their water from aging lead service lines (LSLs) – the lead pipes connecting the water main under the street to homes and other buildings. As the primary source of lead in drinking water, eliminating LSLs is […]
Can Organic Farming and Unions Transform California's Hottest Farm Belt? 3.8.2017 American Prospect
Capital & Main  is an award-winning publication that reports from California on economic, political, and social issues. The American Prospect is co-publishing this piece. This article was written and produced with the support of a journalism fellowship from New America Media, the Gerontological Society of America, and the Silver Century Foundation. Forty-one years ago I was a young organizer for the United Farm Workers in the Coachella Valley, helping agricultural laborers win union elections and negotiate contracts. Suspicion of growers was a survival attitude. I was beaten by the son of one rancher in a vineyard, while trying to talk to people sitting in the vines on their lunch hour. When I met with workers in another field, my old Plymouth Valiant convertible was filled with fertilizer and its tires slashed. By those standards, I could see that HMS Ranch Management, which manages day-to-day operations for ranch owners, was different. I'm sure Ole Fogh-Andersen, who ran the company, would have ...
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Judge weighs environmental impacts, water needs in Las Vegas pipeline fight 1.8.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Las Vegas • Momentum and mitigation were two issues mentioned Monday by a federal judge who will decide whether environmental studies need to be redone for a massive eastern Nevada water pipeline proposed to draw rural water to serve thirsty Las Vegas tourists and residents. U.S. District Judge Andrew Gordon showed with his questions to attorneys that he is weighing environmentalists’ warnings that the project would create dustbowls in valleys along the Nevada-Utah state line against Southern Ne... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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'Missing lead' in Flint water pipes confirms cause of crisis 28.7.2017 Environmental News Network
A study of lead service lines in Flint's damaged drinking water system reveals a Swiss cheese pattern in the pipes' interior crust, with holes where the lead used to be.The findings—led by researchers at the University of Michigan—support the generally accepted understanding that lead leached into the system because that water wasn't treated to prevent corrosion. While previous studies had pointed to this mechanism, this is the first direct evidence. It contradicts a regulator's claim earlier this year that corrosion control chemicals would not have prevented the water crisis.
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Romans are about to go 8 hours a day without water 28.7.2017 Washington Post
Rome boasted the world’s most advanced aqueducts 2,000 years ago, but climate change and crumbling pipes are forcing residents into unprecedented water rationing.
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Scarce rain, leaky pipes combining to dry up much of Italy 23.7.2017 Washington Post: World
Scarce rain and chronically leaky aqueducts have combined this summer to hurt farmers in much of Italy and put Romans at risk for drastic water rationing starting later this week.
A new (agri)culture 21.7.2017 Opinion – The Indian Express
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Under Trump's Orders, EPA Considers Gutting Lead Contamination Rules Even as Water in Schools Tests Positive 20.7.2017 Truthout.com
The American Academy of Pediatrics and several environmental groups are calling for tougher lead standards in light of recent research revealing just how sensitive children are to the potent neurotoxin. But under Trump's executive orders, the EPA is considering gutting its lead contamination rules even as about half the schools that conducted tests in Massachusetts and New Jersey are finding lead in their drinking water. (Photo: Leopold28 ; Edited: LW / TO) This Truthout original was only possible because of our readers' ongoing support. Can you make a monthly donation to ensure we can publish more like it? Click here to give. Environmentalists in New Jersey  released data  this week that may startle parents nationwide: 55 percent of school districts in Bergen County, a wealthy and diverse area outside of New York City, have reported lead contamination in the tap water flowing from their faucets and drinking fountains. Lead is a potent neurotoxin that can cause irreversible cognitive damage and ...
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MIT robot swims through water and gas pipes to detect leaks 19.7.2017 TreeHugger
The robot finds even tiny leaks so that they can be fixed before they become a catastrophic problem.
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Do-It-Yourself Farmer Grows Strawberries In The Air 18.7.2017 NPR News
The West Bank resident liked the elevated, computerized planters funded by USAID. But he wanted to figure out a way to build the system without relying on grants.
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Finding leaks while they're easy to fix 18.7.2017 Environmental News Network
Access to clean, safe water is one of the world’s pressing needs, yet today’s water distribution systems lose an average of 20 percent of their supply because of leaks. These leaks not only make shortages worse but also can cause serious structural damage to buildings and roads by undermining foundations.Unfortunately, leak detection systems are expensive and slow to operate — and they don’t work well in systems that use wood, clay, or plastic pipes, which account for the majority of systems in the developing world.
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From Plate to Plough: Lessons for the field 17.7.2017 Opinion – The Indian Express
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Portland touts revived Willamette River 16.7.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

For decades, residents have been repulsed by the idea of swimming in the Willamette River because of sewage overflows. Now, with a $1.4 billion sewage pipe complete, city officials hope to entice swimmers.
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Denver Water wants to double the amount of recycled water used in the city. The health department’s not sure it’s safe 14.7.2017 Denver Post: Local
Denver Water wants permission to expand uses for recycled water that flows through a 70-mile network of purple pipes in the city. But the state health department isn't sure it's safe to add uses such as flushing toilets and irrigating pot crops to the industrial uses now OK.
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Climate change to deplete some US water basins, reduce irrigated crop yields 13.7.2017 Environmental News Network
A new study by MIT climate scientists, economists, and agriculture experts finds that certain hotspots in the country will experience severe reductions in crop yields by 2050, due to climate change’s impact on irrigation.The most adversely affected region, according to the researchers, will be the Southwest. Already a water-stressed part of the country, this region is projected to experience reduced precipitation by midcentury. Less rainfall to the area will mean reduced runoff into water basins that feed irrigated fields.
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