User: flenvcenter Topic: Water-National
Category: Resource Management :: Irrigation
Last updated: Jun 22 2017 17:45 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Torrey water shortage was a long time coming 22.6.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Before temporarily running out of water over the weekend and declaring a state of emergency Monday, the southern Utah town of Torrey, located just outside Capital Reef National Park, had struggled for years with its water supply. Marie Owens, director of the Utah Division of Drinking Water, said state officials are focused now on addressing the town’s loss of water but also plan to investigate what caused the problem. “It’s not typical, even with a mainline break, for it to become this big of a ... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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89-year-old Ukiah man builds hyperloop competitor in backyard 21.6.2017 SFGate: Business & Technology

An 89-year-old man is attempting to reinvent the train in his backyard in Ukiah.

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Narmada water reaches Aji-I dam through SAUNI pipeline 21.6.2017 India – The Indian Express
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The seeds of discontent 15.6.2017 Opinion – The Indian Express
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‘Engineering with soul’ can help solve the world’s problems 10.6.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

I’m bullish on our country’s scientific and engineering future because more scientists and engineers are multiculturalists, sensitive and empathetic.
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New report fuels more debate over proposed desalination plant in Huntington Beach 3.6.2017 LA Times: Commentary

The protracted debate over Poseidon Water’s proposed ocean desalination plant in Huntington Beach was renewed this week when the State Lands Commission released a draft report analyzing planned additions meant to reduce potential harm to marine life and increase the plant’s efficiency.

The supplement...

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Who has rights to use water in Salt Lake? We've been trying to find out since 1900 29.5.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
When Lance Anderson got a water-rights summons in the mail recently, he thought it might be a winning ticket. Like many of his neighbors, Anderson said he heard water rights were valuable commodities, which made him wonder if he could claim one near the east Salt Lake City apartment complex he co-owns with Craig Robinson. But, as was also true for most of his neighbors, there was no water right. About 35,000 property owners in the downtown area and on the east bench have received court summons r... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Utah officials are trying to figure out who owns various water sources in Salt Lake City 29.5.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
When Lance Anderson got a water-rights summons in the mail recently, he thought it might be a winning ticket. Like many of his neighbors, Anderson said he heard water rights were valuable commodities, which made him wonder if he could claim one near the east Salt Lake City apartment complex he co-owns with Craig Robinson. But, as was also true for most of his neighbors, there was no water right. About 35,000 property owners in the downtown area and on the east bench have received court summons r...
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Utah's quest to document historic water rights hits Salt Lake City 29.5.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
When Lance Anderson got a water-rights summons in the mail recently, he thought it might be a winning ticket. Like many of his neighbors, Anderson said he heard water rights were valuable commodities, which made him wonder if he could claim one near the east Salt Lake City apartment complex he co-owns with Craig Robinson. But, as was also true for most of his neighbors, there was no water right. About 35,000 property owners in the downtown area and on the east bench have received court summons r... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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A Black Woman-Owned Company That Employs Youth and the Formerly Incarcerated Will Replace Flint's Corroded Water Pipes 28.5.2017 Truthout.com
The  Flint water crisis  has dragged on for  over three years  now, leaving residents to rely on bottled water for drinking and cooking while they await clean water. But one black woman and her business may finally end the injustice. At the end of March, the state of Michigan agreed to pay up to  $97 million  in combined federal and state funds to replace Flint's corroded water pipes. The state will have three years to replace any lead or galvanized steel pipes for at least 18,000 homes. A federal judge approved the agreement, which also entitles residents to have their  water tested  for lead four times a year, as well as access to free bottled water and filters. "For the first time, we've been able to have a federal court enforce the state to do the right thing," Flint resident Melissa Mays told All Things Considered, "which is to replace the pipes that their agencies and their administration broke. And now the people can start to see progress." WT Stevens Construction, a  black woman-owned company , ...
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These Stunning Photos Show the Real Cost of a Pipeline 27.5.2017 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by Reveal and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. As police in riot gear swept the last protesters from camps near the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in late February, two dozen men and women arrived in this small ranching and lumber town 1,200 miles to the northwest. They were armed with maps, posters, doughnuts and coffee, and hoped to sell locals on an oil pipeline—one larger and potentially more hazardous than the Dakota Access. They wore its name on their matching green jackets: Trans Mountain. Town officials were already on board. They had signed on in exchange for about $330,000 (420,000 Canadian dollars) from the pipeline's American owner, Kinder Morgan Inc. But a few miles downriver, the Lower Nicola Indian Band was putting the company's offer to a vote the following day. The 14 other First Nations directly on the pipeline route already had agreed to welcome crews onto their reserves in exchange for money and jobs from the company. ...
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Washington state loses big legal battle over salmon culverts 20.5.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals decision Friday could force the state to pay $2 billion to restore salmon habitat by removing barriers that block fish migration.
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Scientists Say Plants Use Sound To Find Water And Ultimately Survive 19.5.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
Scientists are studying and confirming how plants may actually have the ability to sense sounds, like flowing water in a pipe ― or even buzzing insects. What? Plants hear sounds? That’s an earful. But not to researchers at the University of Western Australia, whose experiments point to the possibility that some plants may actually detect sound waves. Evolutionary biologist Monica Gagliano and her colleagues worked with pea seedlings, which they inserted into pots that looked like an upside-down “Y.” According to Scientific American : One arm of each pot was placed in either a tray of water or a coiled plastic tube through which water flowed; the other arm had only soil. The roots grew toward the arm of the pipe with the fluid, regardless of whether it was easily accessible or hidden inside the tubing. “They just knew the water was there, even if the only thing to detect was the sound of it flowing inside the pipe,” Gagliano says. She suggests that the plants can use sound waves to identify water from a ...
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22 percent of Flint excavations have led to copper pipes 18.5.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

FLINT, Mich. (AP) — About 22 percent of excavations tied to Flint’s lead-tainted water crisis have led to copper pipes that do not pose a threat of leaching lead, city records show. Flint Action and Sustainability Team project coordinator Michael McDaniel called the 22 percent a “failure rate” because crews shouldn’t have to spent time […]
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Vertical gardening: 11 to get your vegetables to grow up 17.5.2017 LA Times: Commentary

So it’s nearly summer and you’re itching to plant a garden, but your “estate” is little more than a balcony.

Don’t despair, vertical gardening can fit almost any pocket book or sunny nook.

Kelsey Forster, manager of the Long Beach Office of Sustainability’s Civic Center Edible Garden, particularly...

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Here are a few of the potential conflicts a key Interior Department nominee may face 17.5.2017 LA Times: Commentary
A quick look at David Bernhardt, an Interior Department nominee who could have potential conflicts of interest in several departments reporting to him
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When Improving America’s Infrastructure, Don’t Forget Forests 16.5.2017 WRI Stories
When Improving America’s Infrastructure, Don’t Forget Forests Add Comment|PrintNatural infrastructure like healthy forests can support clean water. Photo by Adirondack Watershed Institute/Flickr America’s water infrastructure is in a state of disrepair, as evidenced by disasters such as the public health crisis in Flint, Michigan and dangerous flooding at the Oroville Dam. While water infrastructure like treatment facilities, flood control systems, pipes, wastewater treatment plants and... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ...
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Utah enters 'unprecedented' era of designer drugs, officials warn 11.5.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Utah officials are preparing to face an “unprecedented” assortment of new street drugs that are concocted by mixing already dangerous substances together into one pill or tablet, said Brian Besser, the district agent in charge for the Drug Enforcement Agency. “These are unprecedented times,” Besser said on Wednesday, speaking to a crowd in front of the new space for the Department of Public Safety’s crime lab, which is working to identify the new combinations being sold. “Every day the flavors c... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Oklahoma prosecutor still pursing case against pipe shop 10.5.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

NORMAN, Okla. (AP) — The Republican district attorney in an Oklahoma college town says he’ll pursue remaining charges in a controversial drug paraphernalia case despite three acquittals and one hung jury so far. Cleveland County District Attorney Greg Mashburn is pursuing criminal charges stemming from two 2015 raids of The Friendly Market in Norman. The […]
U.S. infrastructure failures cause more sinkholes to open up 9.5.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Fraser, Mich. • Dora Linda Nishihara was driving in San Antonio one dark evening in early December when she suddenly disappeared from sight. Later, her car, with her body inside, was found at the bottom of a 12-foot-deep water-filled sinkhole that had swallowed the road ahead of her. Two days later, a school bus driver in Brooklyn, New York, ran into a huge crater on his route. Luckily, no children were on board. The driver survived with minor injuries. Just last week, massive holes opened up in...
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