User: flenvcenter Topic: Water-National
Category: Resource Management :: Irrigation
Last updated: Aug 24 2016 08:18 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Occupying the prairie: Tensions rise as tribes move to block pipeline 24.8.2016 Seattle Times: Business & Technology

A Texas-based company building the Dakota Access pipeline calls the project a major step toward the nation’s weaning itself off foreign oil. But others view the project as an intrusion onto lands where ancestors hunted bison, gathered water and were born and buried.
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Native Activist Winona LaDuke: Pipeline Company Enbridge Has No Right to Destroy Our Future 23.8.2016 Democracy Now!
In North Dakota, more than a thousand indigenous activists from different tribes have converged at the Sacred Stone Spirit Camp, where protesters are blocking construction of the proposed $3.8 billion Dakota Access pipeline. Protesters say the pipeline would threaten to contaminate the Missouri River, which provides water not only for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, but for millions of people downstream. For more, we are joined by Winona LaDuke, Native American activist and executive director of the group Honor the Earth. She lives and works on the White Earth Reservation in northern Minnesota.
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Moses Lake police rescue 2 after car crashes into canal 22.8.2016 AP Washington
MOSES LAKE, Wash. (AP) -- An 18-year-old driver was seriously injured when his car crashed into an irrigation canal in Moses Lake early Sunday....
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Bacteria found in infants has also been found in pipes of Maryland hospital 21.8.2016 Washington Post
Bacteria found in infants has also been found in pipes of Maryland hospital
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People deserve to know if lead pipes and paint are present where they live and work 20.8.2016 Nanotechnology Notes
Tom Neltner, J.D., is the Chemicals Policy Director We live in an increasingly transparent world. When it comes to the real estate market, companies are mining local government databases to let us know the size of a home, how much it’s worth, and even when the roof was last replaced. Yet, you can’t find out if […]
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Autopsy needed to identify body found in Salt Lake City drainage pipe 19.8.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Police hope an autopsy will help identify badly decomposed human remains found clogging a Salt Lake City drainage pipe near the Jordan River. Salt Lake City police Detective Richard Chipping said it was initially impossible to even determine the gender of the body, which was discovered by city Water Department workers cleaning out the drain shortly about 9 a.m. Wednesday at 1310 S. 900 West. “It was too decomposed to tell,” Chipping said, saying the same factor foiled initial efforts to determin...
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Community Agriculture Alliance: Fluid discussions at a round table 18.8.2016 Steamboat Pilot
Water in the West has been a complicated subject for hundreds of years. Every year, a different amount of snowmelt flows downstream from the high country, where most of the water in the Southwest originates. Ancestral cultures of hunting and gathering knew that water, or the lack of it, made for better or worse living. They moved seasonally and abandoned large parts of the West during prolonged droughts. European settlers, farmers and ranchers needed irrigation water for their agricultural culture. Some raised sheep, some cattle, and cultures and uses sometimes clashed. In the American West, eventually, it all comes back to water. Today’s culture is different. Humans still hunt and gather, but more for recreation than need. We farm and ranch, but buy and sell into a wider market. We also use water to generate electrical power, irrigate lawns and even make snow. After we who live upstream use some water, the rivers flow into Utah, Arizona, California and Mexico, where they use water, too. People differ in ...
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Autopsy needed to learn gender, I.D. of body in Salt Lake City drainage pipe 18.8.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Police hope an autopsy will help identify badly decomposed human remains found clogging a Salt Lake City drainage pipe near the Jordan River. Salt Lake City police Detective Richard Chipping said it was initially impossible to even determine the gender of the body, which was discovered by city Water Department workers cleaning out the drain shortly about 9 a.m. Wednesday at 1310 S. 900 West. “It was too decomposed to tell,” Chipping said, saying the same factor foiled initial efforts to determin... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Topgolf to build second location in Thornton alongside Thorncreek course renovation 16.8.2016 Denver Post: Local
The options for golfers in north Thornton are going to improve over the next couple of years. The city-owned Thorncreek Golf Course will close in October and reopen in 2018after a $7 million renovation that will make rounds faster and more fun for golfers, and easier to maintain for the grounds crew. And next year, Topgolf […]
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Federal state of emergency over lead-laced water ends in Flint 14.8.2016 Minnesota Public Radio: News
The city continues to navigate a public health crisis caused by lead-laced water.
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Federal State Of Emergency Over Lead-Laced Water Ends In Flint, Mich. 14.8.2016 NPR News
The federal state of emergency in Flint, Mich. expires today, as the city continues to navigate a public health crisis caused by lead-laced water.
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Flint mayor: 'Everybody played a role in this disaster' 12.8.2016 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
As a federal state of emergency ends for Flint, Mich., Mayor Karen Weaver says residents don't trust that government officials have fully addressed the lead contamination of their water.
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The Government Quietly Just Approved This Enormous Oil Pipeline 12.8.2016 Mother Jones
It took seven years of protests, sit-ins, letter-writing, and, finally, a presidential review to prevent the Keystone XL oil pipeline from being built. Now, in a matter of months, America's newest mega pipeline—the Dakota Access Pipeline Project (DAPL)—has quietly received full regulatory permission to begin construction. Known also as the Bakken Pipeline, the project is slated to run 1,172 miles of 30-inch diameter pipe from North Dakota's northwest Bakken region down to a market hub outside Patoka, Illinois, where it will join extant pipelines and travel onward to refineries and markets in the Gulf and on the East Coast. If that description gives you déjà vu, it should: The Bakken Pipeline is only 7 miles shorter than Keystone's proposed length . The proposed route of the recently-approved Bakken Pipeline Dakota Access The $3.78 billion project is being built by Dakota Access, LLC, a unit of the Texas-based Energy Transfer Partners. (Former Texas governor Rick Perry , friend of Iowa governor Terry ...
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Where Lead Lurks And Why Even Small Amounts Matter 12.8.2016 NPR News
Federal environmental regulations for lead in drinking water still leave room for concentrations high enough to pose a health hazard, critics say.
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Californians Deliver 350,000 Signatures Calling on State, Gov. Brown to Stop Irrigation of Crops With Oil Wastewater 9.8.2016 Commondreams.org Newswire
Center for Biological Diversity Pushing a wheelbarrow filled with 350,000 petition signatures, concerned Californians gathered outside the capitol today to urge Gov. Jerry Brown and the California Water Resources Control Board to stop the potentially dangerous practice of using wastewater from oil drilling to irrigate California’s crops ...
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Can our Weary World Keep Feeding Us? 8.8.2016 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
For most of us in Europe, 8th August is just another summer's day. But it also marks a more chilling moment in our calendar: the day our world starts going into debt. By the 8th we will have used up the supply of natural resources that the Earth can regenerate within one year. For the remaining 40 percent of the year, we will add to the overdraft of nature's budget. Called ' Earth Overshoot Day ', it is a stark reminder that the planet we live on has natural limits within which we must live. And perhaps no other sector is feeling these boundaries more than the agriculture sector that feeds us. As the population surges and our diets become more resource-intensive (think meat, dairy, oils), agriculture is faced with the Herculean task of meeting an ever-increasing demand for food while helping to sustain our landscapes and the very biosphere of the Earth itself. Today, agriculture is the world's single largest driver of global environmental change, much of it negative. So the basic challenge is this: ...
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Is your home irrigation system wasting water? 5.8.2016 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Researchers are taking a close look at Twin Cities lawn watering habits this summer in an effort to reduce the difference between the amount of water cities use in the summer and winter.
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Southwestern Water hears proposals for Dryside irrigation 4.8.2016 Durango Herald
Options to pump Animas River water to Red Mesa for irrigation were recently floated to the Southwestern Water Conservation District, though none of the projects have funding.The proposals would pump water uphill from the Lake Nighthorse intake to Red Mesa Reservoir, east of the La Plata River and about four miles north of the New Mexico...
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Clever rainwater garden grows squash and corn in Arizona desert 4.8.2016 TreeHugger
When you've got a lot of driveway runoff, some careful landscaping can put it to good use.
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Water near Duke's dumps deemed undrinkable 3.8.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Washington • North Carolina’s top public health official acted unethically and possibly illegally by telling residents living near Duke Energy coal ash pits that their well water is safe to drink when it’s contaminated with a chemical known to cause cancer, a state toxicologist said in sworn testimony. The Associated Press obtained a copy of the 220-page deposition given last month by toxicologist Ken Rudo as part of a lawsuit filed against Duke by a coalition of environmental groups. The nation...
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