User: flenvcenter Topic: Water-National
Category: Resource Management :: Irrigation
Last updated: Feb 19 2017 08:26 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Mexico City is a parched and sinking capital 19.2.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

When Mexico City’s Grand Canal was completed, at the end of the 1800s, it promised to solve the flooding and sewage problems that had plagued the city for centuries. But it didn’t. The canal was based on gravity. And Mexico City was sinking, collapsing in on itself.
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Aging sewer pipe under Denver’s southern suburbs fraught with fetid, fiery problems 17.2.2017 Denver Post: News: Local
A methane-fueled fireball hurls manhole covers hundreds of feet, like giant circular saw blades slicing the air. A 60-plus year old pipe collapses 50 feet underground, causing millions of gallons of raw sewage to back up until the noxious stew flows into the South Platte River. It's a disaster that hasn't come to pass yet but sanitation officials in the south suburbs say the doomsday scenario is "not beyond the realm of possibility." "This is something that has to be dealt with really quickly," said Patrick Fitzgerald, [cq comment="cqcq"]district manager of the Platte Canyon Water & Sanitation District.
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California lawmakers are stuck on Trump, but there's a problem at home that needs attention: dirty water 13.2.2017 LA Times: Commentary

While President Trump and his California resistors dominate the spotlight, a little outfit without much pizazz is trying to draw state government’s attention to sickening drinking water in the San Joaquin Valley.

What’s normally heard about water in the parched valley — or read on farmers’ crude...

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Why your watering your lawn all wrong 11.2.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Why dailing back your irrigation system pays big benefits.
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San Joaquin Valley continues to sink because of groundwater pumping, NASA says 10.2.2017 LA Times: Commentary

California’s San Joaquin Valley continues to sink at an alarming rate because of groundwater pumping and irrigation, according to a new study by NASA. 

Ground levels in some areas have dropped 1 to 2 feet in the last two years, creating deeper and wider “bowls” that continue to threaten the vital...

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Saving Energy and Doubling Worldwide Water Supplies – One Drip at a Time 9.2.2017 Main Feed - Environmental Defense
By Kate Zerrenner On a warm December day, I stood in a jojoba field in the Negev Desert in southern Israel and watched water slowly seep up from the ground around the trees. First a tiny spot, then spreading, watering the plants from deep below. This highly efficient system is known as drip irrigation, and I was there to meet with the world’s leading drip irrigation company, Israel-based Netafim. Naty Barak, the Netafim director who I met on the visit, notes that if the world’s farmers increased their use of drip irrigation to 15 percent (up from just under 5 percent now), the amount of water available for use worldwide could double. Drip irrigation saves more than water. Whereas traditional irrigation typically uses quite a bit of energy, drip reduces the pressure (and power) needed to get the water to the crops while reducing the need for energy-hungry fertilizers. Plus, due to the inextricable link between water and power, saving water results in further saved energy. Texas has already enhanced its ...
Dakota Access Pipeline work resumes near reservoir 9.2.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

Work began after the Army granted the pipeline developer formal permission to lay pipe on the final stretch of the disputed project.
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Dakota Access pipeline construction to restart 'immediately' 9.2.2017 Minnesota Public Radio: Business
With the green light from the federal government, the company building the Dakota Access oil pipeline said Wednesday it plans to resume work immediately to finish the long-stalled project.
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Saharan oases struggle as climate change takes a toll 7.2.2017 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
Local residents of North Africa's Maghreb region employ traditional water conservation techniques as desert oases disappear.
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Think big on Colorado River restoration 5.2.2017 Steamboat Pilot
The Colorado River runs through the heart of my family’s ranch near Kremmling, where I live and work, so we have firsthand knowledge of the importance of water to the state. Our family’s irrigated meadows and livestock operation depend on it, and it’s the common currency of our local agriculture and recreation economy. That’s why, through the years, it’s been so hard for me to see the river in sharp decline. For decades, Front Range water utilities have been pumping water from the Upper Colorado, with devastating impacts on river health, including lower flows, spiked water temperature and silt in the river bottom, smothering insect life and damaging the river ecosystem and this world-class trout fishery. Agriculture suffered, too. As river levels dropped, my family and other ranchers in the valley saw our irrigation pumps left high and dry and our operations unsustainable. Another important part of our economy is recreation. Besides helping on the family ranch, I’m also a fly-fishing guide here in the ...
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Judge asked to lift hold on Yellowstone irrigation dam 2.2.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Billings, Mont. • U.S. government attorneys have asked a federal judge to lift an injunction blocking a proposed irrigation dam on the Yellowstone River that critics say could doom an endangered fish. Federal agencies want to start construction on the $57 million project in July, almost two years after U.S. District Judge Brian Morris issued an injunction in response to a lawsuit from wildlife advocates. Further delay could result in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers using money currently set asi...
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Judge asked to lift hold on Yellowstone irrigation dam 2.2.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — U.S. government attorneys have asked a federal judge to lift an injunction blocking a proposed irrigation dam on the Yellowstone River that critics say could doom an endangered fish. Federal agencies want to start construction on the $57 million project in July, almost two years after U.S. District Judge Brian Morris […]
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Here's What's at Stake If Congress Kills the Methane Rules 1.2.2017 Mother Jones
This story was originally published by High Country News and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. In the 1880s, farmers on Colorado's Front Range got fired up about—what else? Water. Their irrigation water came from Clear Creek, a stream that gets its start up on the Continental Divide, then tumbles through mining country before spilling onto the plains west of Denver. Along the way, mills that processed the ore from numerous mines dumped their tailings—sludge loaded with toxic metals and acid-forming sulfides—directly into the stream. It got into the farmers' ditches and, according to news accounts of the time, "covers and chokes the soil wherever it settles." Naturally, the farmers tried to get a law passed that would require miners to contain their "mill slimes."   As white settlement and the resulting industrialization spread, so did the tailings wars. Skirmishes broke out repeatedly along Silver Bow Creek in Montana as well as on the Roaring Fork, Arkansas, Animas, and San ...
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Utility TVA going to trial over pollution claims 30.1.2017 Salt Lake Tribune
Nashville, Tenn. • Environmental groups are taking the Tennessee Valley Authority to trial over waste ash from an aging coal-fired power plant northeast of Nashville, saying it polluted the Cumberland River in violation of the Clean Water Act. In a bench trial starting Monday in federal court in Nashville, the Tennessee Clean Water Network and Tennessee Scenic Rivers Association say the pollution is due to the TVA’s faulty storage of coal ash, a byproduct of burning coal for energy. The nation’...
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The US Is Suffering From a Very Real Water Crisis That Few Are Acknowledging 28.1.2017 Truthout - All Articles
The water crisis in Flint, Michigan told us that dangerous water could be anywhere. That led to investigations by reporters who uncovered one of the most overlooked stories of 2016 -- the effects of water affordability on water quality. While the widespread contamination should raise alarm bells for every American, what might be even more terrifying is the fact that analysts are predicting that in a few decades, we'll be lucky if we can even afford to drink contaminated water. (Photo: Derek Bruff / Flickr ) On January 16, 2016, President Obama  declared a federal emergency  for the city of Flint, Michigan, over the contamination of the city's drinking water. One year later, not only is the city still struggling to provide clean sources of water to the Michigan city's population, but the plight of residents in Flint has opened up the conversation about a water crisis in the United States that very few people even knew existed. The sad story of Flint, Michigan, gained national attention because it was a ...
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Flint water lead level now below federal limit 25.1.2017 Terrorism

The Flint Water Plant water tower in Flint, Mich. (Carlos Osorio/AP)Michigan officials tout a new lead level, although the city's residents say the development doesn't make them any less cautious.


Flint water falls below federal lead limits, but residents still asked to use filtered water 25.1.2017 Washington Post
The news did little to dent the mistrust in government that remains in the Michigan city, which has gone 1,000 days without reliably clean drinking water.
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APNewsBreak: Flint water has fallen below federal lead limit 24.1.2017 Seattle Times: Nation & World

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Flint’s water system no longer has levels of lead exceeding the federal limit, a key finding that Michigan state environmental officials said Tuesday is good news for a city whose 100,000 residents have been grappling with the man-made water crisis. The 90th percentile of lead concentrations in Flint was 12 parts […]
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DEA, El Paso County authorities serve warrants targeting illegal indoor marijuana grows 24.1.2017 Denver Post: News: Local
Federal agents teamed up with authorities in El Paso County on Monday morning to serve several warrants and make arrests in connection with an out-of-state organization suspected of illegally growing marijuana east of Colorado Springs.
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NY governor seeks $2B to fix some of nation’s oldest pipes 22.1.2017 Seattle Times: Top stories

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo wants $2 billion to address some of the nation’s oldest water and sewer systems — and while that sounds like a lot of money, it’s a drop in the bucket of what the state’s experts say is truly required. They say it would actually cost $80 […]
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