User: flenvcenter Topic: Water-National
Category: Resource Management :: Irrigation
Last updated: Jul 29 2016 02:54 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Runyon Canyon Park set to reopen after 4-month closure 29.7.2016 LA Times: Commentary

Runyon Canyon Park, the popular hiking area known for its scenic trails in the Hollywood Hills, will reopen next week after a four-month closure, city officials said Thursday.

The path was temporary closed while crews replaced an aging 6-inch water main that snakes through the canyon for roughly...

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Mapping lead service lines: DC Water offers a model for utilities across the nation 25.7.2016 Nanotechnology Notes
Lindsay McCormick is a Research Analyst. When I moved to Washington, DC four years ago the phrase “lead service lines” did not roll off my tongue. That began to change as I became aware of DC’s historical lead problems – and dramatically so in the wake of the crisis in Flint, Michigan. But I’m not […]
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If you have sinus problems, nasal rinses can really help, study says 24.7.2016 Washington Post
If you have sinus problems, nasal rinses can really help, study says
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Environmental regulators say levels of toxic algae decreasing; Utah Lake water OK for irrigation 23.7.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
The Utah County Health Department has decided to end its closure of the Jordan River in Utah County, but Utah Lake remains closed and health advisories remain in effect, based on the latest data from the Utah Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ). The most recent set of tests found that concentrations of cyanobacteria in Utah Lake have decreased in most locations to nonthreatening levels, with the exceptions of Lincoln Harbor and the American Fork harbor, where counts continue to exceed the ... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Phoenix police: Workers find apparent human remains in sewer 22.7.2016 Seattle Times: Top stories

PHOENIX (AP) — Police on Thursday said they searched a wastewater sewer system in a neighborhood where partial human remains were found after city workers investigated a clog. A Phoenix Police Department spokesman, Officer James Holmes, said workers found remains in a sewer line Wednesday night after a resident of the neighborhood called to complain […]
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Coastline in Long Beach could reopen after spill dumped 2.4 million gallons of sewage 21.7.2016 LA Times: Commentary

Beaches in Long Beach could reopen Thursday following a major sewage leak that spilled 2.4 million gallons of waste into the Los Angeles River earlier this week.

A second set of test samples was taken Wednesday to determine whether the waters were safe, said Nelson Kerr, manager of Long Beach’s...

Rio rower: I was terrified of water 21.7.2016 CNN: Top Stories
Dattu Bhokanal was once terrified of water.
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Farmers fear for crops as Utah Lake algae threat spreads to Salt Lake County 19.7.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Stephanie Cannon’s tomatoes may go dry this week if algae from Utah Lake make their way into her irrigation canal. “I wouldn’t feel uncomfortable about watering my lawn with” irrigation water from the canal, said Cannon, a commercial tomato grower and president of the Upper Canal Irrigation Co. in Millcreek and Holladay, “but I don’t want to put it on our tomatoes.” State water officials announced Sunday that algae from Utah Lake, where a toxic algal bloom was discovered last week, appear to hav... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Algae covering 90 percent of Utah Lake is dissipating but becoming more toxic, possibly moving 17.7.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
The toxic algal bloom in Utah Lake is getting smaller but possibly more dangerous, officials say, as poisonous cyanobacteria cells release higher levels of toxins into the water as they die. Officials are also testing water in the Jordan River and canals fed by Utah Lake to determine whether the bloom is spreading, and farmers have been urged to avoid using irrigation water that comes from the lake. The bloom, which covers 90 percent of the lake, is the largest ever seen by a man who’s been stu... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Cell counts of poisonous algae in Utah Lake dropping, but releasing more toxins -- and possibly spreading into Jordan River 17.7.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
The toxic algal bloom in Utah Lake is getting smaller but possibly more dangerous, officials say, as poisonous cyanobacteria cells release higher levels of toxins into the water as they die. Officials are also testing water in the Jordan River and canals fed by Utah Lake to determine whether the bloom is spreading, and farmers have been urged to avoid using irrigation water that comes from the lake. The bloom, which covers 90 percent of the lake, is the largest ever seen by a man who’s been stu... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Environmental groups push EPA to hold mining companies accountable 16.7.2016 Durango Herald
WASHINGTON, D.C. – Environmental groups are calling on the Environmental Protection Agency to hold mining companies financially accountable for on-site damages at mines in a report released this week. The report was released just days before the U.S. House on Thursday passed the 2017 Interior and Environment Appropriations bill,...
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New York Could Be the First State to Make Its Public Schools Test for Lead 15.7.2016 Mother Jones
New York, home to more than 2.5 million public school students, may soon pass the nation's first law requiring regular testing of water in those schools for the presence of lead. It likely won't be the last: This year, at least 20 bills in seven states have been introduced to address lead contamination in school water, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. The bills reflect a testing frenzy: The water crisis in Flint, Michigan, led dozens of school districts, often at the behest of worried parents, to test water at water fountains and taps, children's main source of drinking water on school days. "No one was testing," Robert Barrett, CEO of water testing firm Aqua Pro-Tech Laboratories, told the New York Times . "Now all of a sudden they're all going crazy." Some results have been worrisome: In Newark, more than half of the city's 67 schools had at least one fountain or sink whose water exceeded the Environmental Protection Agency's threshold for lead contamination. This spring, ...
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Sorry, Flint, Congress Has Nothing For You 15.7.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
WASHINGTON ― Congress is set to adjourn for the summer without approving any of the big aid initiatives that had been discussed for Flint, Michigan. Several senators urged Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) in the weeks leading up to the break, which starts on Friday, to bring up a broader piece of legislation that contains a $220 million aid package for communities grappling with crumbling water infrastructure like Flint. “Here I was, wishful thinking for a long time,” Sen. Jim Inhofe (R-Okla.) told The Huffington Post on Thursday. “I’m not criticizing Mitch, because he said if we can find a place ... we can do it, but it just didn’t happen.” In recent weeks, the Senate has been busy with legislation relating to the Zika virus threat and the opioid epidemic, and the debate over gun violence. Late last month, Inhofe and 29 other Republicans sent a letter to McConnell pressing him to bring the Water Resources Development bill that includes the Flint money up for a vote before the summer ...
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Study: Pipe-corroding well water prevalent in half of states 14.7.2016 AP Washington
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -- Half of U.S. states have a high prevalence of well water that&apos;s corrosive enough to leach lead from pipes, the U.S. Geological Survey said Wednesday....
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Study: Pipe-corroding well water prevalent in half of states 13.7.2016 Seattle Times: Top stories

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A federal study shows half of U.S. states have a high percentage of wells with water corrosive enough to leach lead from pipes. U.S. Geological Survey researchers said Wednesday their study was the largest yet of groundwater that supplies the 44 million Americans who use private wells. Eleven East Coast states […]
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Hay growers pulling irrigation off meadows, ready for harvest 12.7.2016 Steamboat Pilot
It’s almost time for the grass hay harvest to begin, and farmers and ranchers in Routt County are pulling the irrigation water off their meadows so the mown hay will dry out quickly. Ample snowpack last winter and ground-saturating moisture that fell in April are helping Routt County hay farmers through a dry start to the summer. CSU Extension Agent Todd Hagenbuch said he anticipates a fairly average hay harvest. “You’ll see irrigated ground around here going up right quick,” Hagenbuch said July 11. “When the seed head forms and it’s putting on leaves, it’s really ready (the long, slender leaves of grass hay are where the digestible protein is stored). It wasn’t until June that we finally warmed up. We had no spring when the grass started to grow, but it made up for lost time. A week later, we thought, ‘Wow, how did that happen?'" As of July 7, the U.S. Department of Agriculture was reporting that small bales of Routt County hay, perhaps left over from the previous summer, was selling for $180 a ton and ...
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Birds, beavers, bats and rats: Seattle’s urban wildlife thrives 12.7.2016 Seattle Times: Local

The geography of the Northwest brings a diversity of wildlife — and related headaches. Birds get in the path of jetliners. Crows frequently knock out power. And rats occasionally crawl up toilets.
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I Was Sick for a Year After an Oil Spill. Five Years Later, Pipeline Accidents Are Worsening 10.7.2016 Truthout - All Articles
Crude oil covers plant on the Bonogofsky farm during on July 2, 2011, Exxon oil spill on the Yellowstone River. (Photo: Alexis B. Bonogofsky) After the Exxon pipeline break of 2011, the oily water entered the sloughs, pond and creek of my family's farm on the Yellowstone River, sending me to the hospital with severe hydrocarbon exposure. Despite legislative attempts to increase pipeline safety, accidents are still on the rise. Crude oil covers plant on the Bonogofsky farm during on July 2, 2011, Exxon oil spill on the Yellowstone River. (Photo: Alexis B. Bonogofsky) Early in the morning on July 2, 2011, I walked down the gravel road on our Montana farm to let the goats out to graze for the day. I found an oily rainbow sheen on the Yellowstone River flowing through our hay fields and pasture, plus large clumps of crude oil sticking to trees, cattails and brush. The oily water was in our sloughs, our pond and the creek that runs along the eastern edge of the farm. I checked the local news on my phone and ...
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How does climate change aggravate street flooding? 7.7.2016 Minnesota Public Radio: News
Climate scientists have noted that warming temperatures put more moisture in the atmosphere, leading to heavier rains.
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Fisherman reels in pipe bomb at Barr Lake in Adams County 4.7.2016 Denver Post: News: Local
The Adams County Sheriff's Office bomb squad is headed to the lake to determine whether the pipe bomb could still explode after being submerged in the water.
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