User: flenvcenter Topic: Water-National
Category: Resource Management :: Irrigation
Last updated: May 26 2016 09:34 IST RSS 2.0
 
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San Juan National Forest considers projects targeting wildfires, mussels 26.5.2016 Durango Herald
Efforts to prevent forest fires and invasive mussels are among the list of projects that may receive funding from the U.S. Forest Service this year.On Tuesday, the San Juan Title II Resource Advisory Committee recommended several projects throughout Dolores, La Plata, Montezuma and San Juan counties to the Forest Service.The...
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Who Will Replace Our Century-Old Water Pipes? 26.5.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Jo Miles

The water that comes out of your tap is clean, right?

It should be. But in the United States, we can’t afford to keep taking for granted that safe, clean water flows from our taps.

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In battle to keep lead from water, St. Paul digs deep 25.5.2016 Minnesota Public Radio: News
The city's ambitious plan to get rid of thousands of lead service lines isn't a perfect solution to removing lead from drinking water, but it's progress.
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A warming world means less water, with economic consequences 23.5.2016 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
We know that climate change will make water scarcer. But it could also have big economic impacts, Richard Damania of the World Bank says.
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It's Disturbingly Common For Americans To Go Days Without Safe Drinking Water 23.5.2016 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
On April 19, Brian Power woke up to a big problem. A 12-inch water main had burst open at 4:15 a.m. near the Cougar Country Drive-In, the restaurant he manages in Pullman, Washington. The main break had dumped several hundred thousand gallons of water into the streets, increasing the risk of contamination for Pullman's water supply. The city issued a boil water order after the break, meaning its 31,000 residents had to boil their water before cooking, drinking or brushing their teeth. Pullman didn't require area restaurants to close , which some municipalities have to do when boil order  is in effect, but Power opted to shut down his restaurant for three days while the city carried out its repairs. It would simply be too expensive and challenging for the restaurant to adhere to the guidelines of the boil water order, he decided.  “There was the option for us as a business to stay open,” Power told The Huffington Post. “But due to the equipment and how much direct water we pull from the line for our ...
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Massive Navajo farm heads into week 2 with no irrigation 23.5.2016 Durango Herald
The largest farm on the Navajo Nation has been without water for more than a week after a pipeline break, endangering food crops worth millions of dollars and threatening jobs.Most of the crops on the land managed by the Navajo Agricultural Products Industry near Farmington were planted just before the concrete pipe failed, cutting off...
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Massive Navajo farm heads into week 2 with no irrigation 23.5.2016 Seattle Times: Nation & World

The largest farm on the Navajo Nation has been without water for more than a week after a pipeline break, endangering food crops worth millions of dollars and threatening jobs. Most of the crops on the land managed by the Navajo Agricultural Products Industry near Farmington, New Mexico, were planted just before the concrete pipe […]
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A Warming World Means Less Water, With Economic Consequences 23.5.2016 NPR Health Science
We know that climate change will make water scarcer. But it could also have big economic impacts, Richard Damania of the World Bank says.
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Lead, iron contaminate water at community college building 22.5.2016 AP Washington
SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) -- The water is shut off at a community college building where high levels of lead and iron were found....
Local water managers ask for help funding repair backlog they say could quadruple Utahns' rates 20.5.2016 Salt Lake Tribune
Managers from four of Utah’s largest water districts are asking lawmakers to fund a fifth of the estimated $18 billion in repairs they believe will be necessary by the year 2060. And even with the state’s help, they told a legislative committee, Utahns’ water rates could quadruple over the next 40 to 50 years as water providers grapple with the maintenance backlog. “Growth is an important and interesting dynamic, but it’s going to take more money simply to maintain what we have in place today th... <iframe src="http://www.sltrib.com/csp/mediapool/sites/sltrib/pages/garss.csp" height="1" width="1" > </frame>
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Should farmers or city pay to clean the water? Iowa may decide 18.5.2016 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
A Des Moines Water Works lawsuit could bring historic change to water regulation and farm economics across the country. A key question: Should farmers be held liable for the pollution draining from their fields?
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How to fix a faulty downspout 17.5.2016 Washington Post
How to fix a faulty downspout
Random acts of conservation: Water quality depends on farmers' willingness, not regulation 17.5.2016 Minnesota Public Radio: Law & Justice
Roughly 40 percent of Minnesota's lakes and streams are polluted, mostly thanks to soil, fertilizer and other contaminants flowing off farm fields. With little regulation, reversing that trend is almost solely reliant on the goodwill of farmers.
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"Water Is Our Life": How a Mining Disaster Affected the Navajo Nation 16.5.2016 Truthout.com
Nearly a year ago, Environmental Protection Agency contractors accidentally released 3 million gallons of acid drainage from a Colorado mine, contaminating local rivers with hazardous metals and turning the waterways yellow. Just downstream, residents of the Navajo Nation continue to face threats to their health and livelihood. Wastewater from the Gold King Mine drains into retention ponds to eliminate contamination before it flows into the Animas River near Silverton, Colorado, August 15, 2015. (Photo: Mark Holm / The New York Times) In the midst of the ongoing water crisis in Flint, Michigan, it is not surprising that the World Health Organization recently released a report documenting that the environment is responsible for almost a quarter of deaths and disease in the world. But this is not news to the Diné (Navajo) people, who believe that all parts of nature -- the water, fish, trees and stars -- are equal members of society and are so intricately connected that an imbalance in one member may ...
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Students receive bottled water after South L.A. schools report murky tap water 12.5.2016 LA Times: Commentary

Teachers handed out bottled water to hundreds of students at Grape Street Elementary School on Wednesday amid concerns about murky, discolored water flowing from taps and fountains at that school and four others in South Los Angeles.

The precautions are the latest hits to Watts and the neighboring...

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Exploiting Global Warming for Geo-Politics 11.5.2016 Commondreams.org Views
Jonathan Marshall

For Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump, the only thing to fear about climate change is fear itself. As he declared in a 2014 tweet, “This very expensive GLOBAL WARMING bullshit has got to stop.” Perhaps taking his words to heart, the four major U.S.

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Environmentalists Hate Fracking. Are They Right? 11.5.2016 Mother Jones
What if President Barack Obama's biggest achievement on climate change was actually a total failure? That's the central argument of a recent story in the Nation by Bill McKibben, a journalist and environmental activist. "If you get the chemistry wrong," McKibben writes, "it doesn't matter how many landmark climate agreements you sign or how many speeches you give. And it appears the United States may have gotten the chemistry wrong. Really wrong." McKibben's criticism is all about fracking, the controversial oil and gas drilling technique that involves blasting underground shale formations with high-pressure water, sand, and chemicals. (He made a similar case here in Mother Jones in September 2014.) Over the last decade, we've witnessed much-celebrated strides in solar and other renewable sources of electricity. But by far the most significant change in America's energy landscape has been a major shift from coal to natural gas. The trend was already underway when Obama took office, but it reached a ...
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One city’s solution to drinking water contamination? Get rid of every lead pipe. 11.5.2016 Washington Post
One city’s solution to drinking water contamination? Get rid of every lead pipe.
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In another sign the drought may be easing, MWD ends water limits 11.5.2016 LA Times: Commentary

Citing the state’s improved hydrology, officials at Southern California’s massive water wholesaler voted Tuesday to rescind the cuts they imposed on regional water deliveries last year.

Effective immediately, the Southland cities and water districts that make purchases from the Metropolitan Water...

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There Could Be Lead in Your Water at Home. Here's What You Can Do About It. 9.5.2016 Mother Jones
Since news broke of the Flint crisis, lots of readers have asked for tips on how to avoid lead contamination in their own water. And for good reason: Lead pipes and plumbing are still relatively common in America, and water testing for the contaminant is notoriously spotty . Until the mid-1900s, lead was a go-to material for plumbing and service lines—the pipes that connect the city's main pipes to each home. It wasn't until 1986 that the US Environmental Protection Agency, recognizing the element's disastrous effects on kids' brains, mandated that all new lead solder, plumbing, and service lines be "lead-free." The catch is that the rule didn't apply to buildings constructed before 1986, and "lead-free" was defined as 8 percent lead until 2014, when a new policy kicked in that lowered that number to 0.25 percent. Under the Safe Drinking Water Act, utilities are supposed to test water for lead each year—and if more than 10 percent of homes have higher levels than the federal standard of 15 parts per ...
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