User: flenvcenter Topic: Water-National
Category: Policy
1 new since Apr 24 2018 21:43 IST RSS 2.0
 
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People Have to Strengthen the Laws Protecting Our Water 24.4.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Residents of Flint, Michigan, have been told that the state that poisoned their drinking water will no longer provide them free bottled water. Meanwhile, Michigan approved a permit letting the Nestlé Corporation pump more fresh water out of the Great Lakes Basin to bottle and sell for a profit.  (Photo: Pixabay ) Janine Jackson: It is impossible, really, not to connect two recent pieces of news: Residents of Flint, Michigan, have been  told  that the state that  poisoned  their drinking water will no longer provide them free bottled water. They'll be going back to paying some of the highest prices in the country, some $200 a month, for water that may still be making them sick. The Washington Post  reports  at least 12,000 homes in Flint still waiting for replacement of lead pipes. At the same time, Michigan  approved  a permit letting the Nestlé Corporation pump more fresh water out of a well in the Great Lakes Basin to bottle and sell at a profit, more than half a million gallons a day, the right to ...
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The Energy 202: Why Scott Pruitt's decision on burning wood is so high stakes 24.4.2018 Washington Post: Politics
The notion that biomass is carbon neutral is contentious among scientists.
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Homeowners shouldn't be punished for capturing rainwater. Vote yes on Proposition 72 24.4.2018 LA Times: Commentary

Proposition 72 is one of the easier questions on the June 5 ballot. Homeowners should be rewarded, not penalized, for collecting the rainwater that falls on their roofs and for using it on their landscaping to save precious tap water. This measure would ensure that adding an expensive rainwater...

Trigger Warning: John Waters to get 'Filthy' on Penn campus 23.4.2018 Philly.com News
John Waters will talk about the finer points of his filth today at the Zellerbach Theater.
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Canary in the Coal Pond 23.4.2018 Truthout.com
New reports provide an unprecedented look at contaminants leaking from coal ash ponds and landfills. But the chasm between information and environmental protection may deepen thanks to a proposed Trump administration rollback that would lessen the consequences and weaken requirements for polluting power plants. Coal ash slurry pours into the first of two settling ponds adjacent to the Riverbend Steam Station on Mountain Island Lake in Gaston County, North Carolina, January 23, 2008. (Photo: Jeff Willhelm / Charlotte Observer / MCT via Getty Images) In tests conducted in late 2017, one in three coal-fired power plants nationwide detected "statistically significant" amounts of contaminants, including harmful chemicals like arsenic, in the groundwater around their facilities. This information, which utility companies had to post on their websites in March, became public for the first time under an Obama-era environmental rule regulating coal ash, the waste generated from burning coal. Mixed with water and ...
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Fearing Ethiopian dam, Egypt bans water-intensive crops 23.4.2018 Washington Post: World
Egypt’s parliament has passed a law banning the cultivation of crops that require a large amount of water, amid fears that a massive Ethiopian dam being built upstream could cut into the country’s share of the Nile.
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Pumpkin patches vs. ropes courses: Fairfax County battles farmers over agritourism 23.4.2018 Washington Post
Pumpkin patches vs. ropes courses: Fairfax County battles farmers over agritourism
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The CIA closed its original 'black site' years ago. But its legacy of torture lives on in Thailand 22.4.2018 L.A. Times - World News
Collaborating with the CIA ushered in an era of impunity for Thai security forces that adopted the agency's torture methods, according to human rights groups.
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New ‘danger’ markers on a Virginia waterway threaten livelihoods and ignite calls for dredging funds 22.4.2018 Washington Post
New ‘danger’ markers on a Virginia waterway threaten livelihoods and ignite calls for dredging funds
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Perched on a platform high in a tree, a 61-year-old woman fights a gas pipeline 22.4.2018 Washington Post
Theresa “Red” Terry is trying to stop a natural gas pipeline from coming through Virginia land granted to her husband’s family by the king of England in colonial times. For three weeks, she has endured rain, snow, hail, high winds and nighttime temperatures in the 20s. As the stalemate drags on, “I stand with Red” has become a rallying cry for opponents of the 300-mile, $3.5-billion Mountain Valley Pipeline.
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The Trump Administration Wants to Make Groundwater Less Safe in Coal Country 21.4.2018 Mother Jones
This story originally appeared on ProPublica. In tests conducted in late 2017, one in three coal-fired power plants nationwide detected “statistically significant” amounts of contaminants, including harmful chemicals like arsenic, in the groundwater around their facilities. This information, which utility companies had to post on their websites in March, became public for the first time under […]
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The energy revolution has already begun 21.4.2018 Washington Post
The energy revolution has already begun
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These Pinelands explorers may be paddling their kayaks through your next glass of water 21.4.2018 Philly.com News
A group of 28 people set out Friday by kayak for a 40 mile, three-day sojourn to trace the source of the Rancocas Creek from a spring to Penns Landing.
These whales will be extinct in 25 years, scientists say — unless we act now to save them 21.4.2018 Washington Post: World
Not a single newborn North Atlantic right whale was seen this year.
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Catching a Breeze 20.4.2018 American Prospect
This article appears in the Spring 2018 issue of The American Prospect. Subscribe here .  Three years ago, after the collapse of Cape Wind off Nantucket Sound, renewable offshore wind energy in the United States was “a stone dead market,” according to Thomas Brostrøm, president of Ørsted North America. His Danish parent company, formerly DONG Energy, has built more offshore wind farms than any country in the world. Cape Wind, the 130-turbine, 468-megawatt brainchild of clean energy entrepreneur Jim Gordon, was litigated to the grave by local residents as too ruinous to the Cape Cod seascape. It was resisted by liberal Kennedys and right-wing Kochs alike. Despite its environmental benefits, the project also was persistently criticized as a noncompetitive boondoggle with outrageous power costs. The death knell of America’s first would-be offshore wind farm was arguably most felt in New Bedford, Massachusetts. That city, despite being the richest seafood port in the United States, has long been beset by ...
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Catching a Breeze 20.4.2018 American Prospect
This article appears in the Spring 2018 issue of The American Prospect. Subscribe here .  Three years ago, after the collapse of Cape Wind off Nantucket Sound, renewable offshore wind energy in the United States was “a stone dead market,” according to Thomas Brostrøm, president of Ørsted North America. His Danish parent company, formerly DONG Energy, has built more offshore wind farms than any country in the world. Cape Wind, the 130-turbine, 468-megawatt brainchild of clean energy entrepreneur Jim Gordon, was litigated to the grave by local residents as too ruinous to the Cape Cod seascape. It was resisted by liberal Kennedys and right-wing Kochs alike. Despite its environmental benefits, the project also was persistently criticized as a noncompetitive boondoggle with outrageous power costs. The death knell of America’s first would-be offshore wind farm was arguably most felt in New Bedford, Massachusetts. That city, despite being the richest seafood port in the United States, has long been beset by ...
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Thousands of Poor Detroiters Are About to Get Their Water Cut Off 19.4.2018 Mother Jones
In the next few weeks, Detroit is set to start shutting off water to thousands of residents with unpaid bills. Since the shutoffs began four years ago, tens of thousands of Detroiters have had their water cut off, drawing sharp criticism from local antipoverty activists as well as the United Nations. Households are slated for shutoff once their […]
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NASA's Tess spacecraft embarks on quest to find new planets 19.4.2018 AP National
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) -- NASA's Tess spacecraft embarked Wednesday on a quest to find new worlds around neighboring stars that could support life....
Colorado and three states accuse Arizona of manipulating Colorado River supply and demand 19.4.2018 Denver Post: News: Local
Tension over the drought-stressed Colorado River escalated into a public feud when Colorado and three other states accused an Arizona utility of manipulating supply and demand, potentially threatening the river's future.
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Daily Digest: House GOP fights nitrate rules 17.4.2018 Minnesota Public Radio: Politics
Some political stories in the news as you begin your Tuesday.
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