User: flenvcenter Topic: Water-Independent
Category: Water Quality :: Wetlands
Last updated: Jul 02 2020 01:27 IST RSS 2.0
 
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A military legacy loosens its grip on a landscape 21.9.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Plans for Colorado’s Camp Hale balance restoration and commemoration.
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Ancient wetlands offer window into climate change 11.9.2017 Environmental News Network
Environmental researchers have uncovered a wealth of information about a unique part of Australia that offers never-before-seen insights into climate change since the last ice age.
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Trump administration erodes environmental protections 11.9.2017 High Country News Most Recent
The courts have slowed some rollbacks but many have moved ahead.
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China's 'sponge cities' aim to reuse most rainwater 11.9.2017 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
It's an ambitious plan to arrest urban flooding, but can it overcome local constraints?
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As Hurricanes Intensify, So Does Resistance to Big Oil in the Gulf 10.9.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Louisiana-based organizer Cherri Foytlin addresses a crowd of protesters at Energy Transfer Partners corporate headquarters in Dallas, Texas. Indigenous and environmental activists from across the country demonstrated against the company's pipeline projects, including the Bayou Bridge Pipeline, which would carry oil from east Texas across the sensitive wetlands of southern Louisiana. (Photo: Ethan Buckner / Earthworks) Petrochemical facilities in south Texas released millions of pounds of dangerously toxic chemicals like benzene, hexane and toluene in the wake of Hurricane Harvey. For environmentalists and indigenous activists in the Gulf South, where sea levels are rising and precious wetlands that protect against floods and storm surges are disappearing, resisting Big Oil is becoming a matter of survival. Louisiana-based organizer Cherri Foytlin addresses a crowd of protesters at Energy Transfer Partners corporate headquarters in Dallas, Texas, on Friday. Indigenous and environmental activists from ...
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Menominee Tribe Seeks Stricter Federal Oversight in Michigan Mine Fight 3.9.2017 Truthout - All Articles
In its continued fight against a mine near sacred waters, the Menominee Indians of Wisconsin want stronger federal regulations to apply as officials weigh the final permit for mine approval. At issue is the Back Forty mine, a proposed 83-acre open pit gold, zinc and copper mine in the southwestern corner of Michigan's Upper Peninsula. The mine would sit within 150 feet of the Menominee River, which forms the Michigan-Wisconsin border -- and is namesake for the Menominee Tribe across the border in Wisconsin. Environmental Health News highlighted the Menominee's fight last year in "Sacred Water," a national look at how culturally significant water resources -- both on and off reservation -- get sullied, destroyed, defaced by activities often happening beyond Native Americans' control. The mine was on track for approval but has been stagnant, as it still needs one permit -- a wetlands permit -- before beginning operation. The state of Michigan has controlled permitting to this point. This week the Menominee ...
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Why the big mitigation bankers are embracing ecological restoration 24.8.2017 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Mitigation banking is in the spotlight as a new group emerges and a leading trade association renames itself.
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Destruction of small wetlands directly linked to algal blooms in Great Lakes 19.8.2017 Environmental News Network
Canada’s current wetland protection efforts have overlooked how the environment naturally protects fresh-water resources from agricultural fertilizer contaminants, researchers from the University of Waterloo have found.In a recent study, researchers at Waterloo’s Faculty of Science and Faculty of Engineering found that small wetlands have a more significant role to play than larger ones in preventing excess nutrients like nitrogen and phosphorus from fertilizer from reaching waterbodies such as the Great Lakes.
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Planting Resilience to Climate Change 6.8.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Aurelia Arzú inspects the cocoplum patch and reaches in to pluck the ripest fruits. It’s early in the year, and the season is just beginning, so the bush is loaded with edible, plum-sized fruit ripening from yellow to pink in the unrelenting afternoon sun. Arzú bites into the cocoplum, quite literally eating the fruits of her labor. Together with other local Garifuna women, she planted cocoplum, seagrape, and other native coastal plants on and around the sand dunes in an effort to halt their advance and prevent further displacement of Santa Rosa de Aguán community residents. Aurelia Arzú inspects a cocoplum bush planted by local Garifuna women, selecting the ripest fruit to eat. (Photo: Sandra Cuffe) "It fills me with pride to see this and to know that the women helped protect our community," says Arzú, looking out at the burgeoning vegetation. Arzú's footprints crisscross the sandy expanse, tracing a path from the Caribbean Sea lapping at the northern coast of Honduras to the dunes now dotted with ...
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Goldman Sachs, Calvert bet on next big thing for green investments 1.8.2017 GreenBiz.com
Impact investing is set for staggering growth. Here's a closer look at the role of environmental impact bonds.
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Insuring nature, ensuring resilience 1.8.2017 GreenBiz.com
Market-based strategies only go so far. These new types of products can protect and restore ecosystems in peril.
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'Invasive' species have been around much longer than believed 31.7.2017 Environmental News Network
The DST-NRF Centre of Excellence for Palaeoscience funded researchers based in the School of Geography, Archaeology and Environmental Studies and in the Evolutionary Studies Institute of the University of the Witwatersrand have used fossil pollen records to solve an on-going debate regarding invasive plant species in eastern Lesotho.
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Trump’s Ethical Swamp 31.7.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
He said he’d drain it. Instead he brought it into the White House.
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The ALEC Swampland 25.7.2017 Truthout - All Articles
NOTE: From July 19-21, the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) met in Denver with its corporate funders and Republican state legislators. Though ALEC has an uneasy relationship with President Trump, they haven't hesitated in adopting his "drain the swamp" rhetoric when extolling their plans to amend the federal constitution, repeal workers' rights or gut social safety net programs. Trump keeps filling his "swamp" with cronies, political insiders and the corporate lobbyists that also populate the ALEC swamp. One of these lobbyists, working for the behemoth Chinese online retailer Alibaba, asked me to communicate information about his company to my (presumably male) boss. When I replied that I am a legislator, he looked me up and down incredulously until I replied, "They let women be legislators now." He didn't speak to me again. Experiencing ALEC is like diving into a swamp inhabited by creatures of the past. ALEC pushes policies that take us back to a federal government sitting on the sidelines ...
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Dakota Access Company Cozied Up To Ohio Officials. Then A Pollution Nightmare Began. 15.7.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Newly released documents related to its Rover pipeline give weight to critics who call Energy Transfer Partners a “wolf in sheep’s clothing.”
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America Relieved It Didn't Elect The Reckless Email Candidate 13.7.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
But her emails...
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Does Scott Pruitt Have a Solid Case for Repealing the Clean Water Rule? 11.7.2017 Truthout.com
On June 27, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt signed a proposed rule rescinding the Obama administration's " Clean Water Rule ." This regulation is designed to clarify which streams, lakes, wetlands and other water bodies fall under the protection of the Clean Water Act.  EPA developed the Clean Water Rule in an attempt to resolve uncertainty created by a fractured 2006 Supreme Court decision, Rapanos v. United States. The Rapanos ruling caused widespread confusion about which waters were covered,  creating uncertainty for farmers, developers and conservation groups . Efforts to clarify it through informal guidance or congressional action had failed, and EPA acted under mounting pressure from various quarters, including some members of the court. As Oklahoma's attorney general, Pruitt unsuccessfully  sued to kill the rule , which he has  called  "the greatest blow to private property rights the modern era has seen." Now he is seeking to accomplish by administrative fiat what he ...
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How A Georgia Town Thwarted A Plan To Dump Tons Of Toxic Coal Ash 28.6.2017 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
When news spread in Wayne County, Georgia, that Republic Services planned to dump toxic coal ash in their landfill, citizens and the local newspaper fought back.
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Why the World's Rivers Are Losing Sediment and Why It Matters 20.6.2017 Environmental News Network - Spotlight
Vast amounts of river-borne sediment are trapped behind the world’s large dams, depriving areas downstream of material that is badly needed to build up the marshes and wetlands that act as a buffer against rising seas.In September 2011, after 20 years of planning, workers began dismantling the Elwha and Glines dams on the Elwha River in northwestern Washington state. At the time, it was the largest dam removal project in U.S. history, and it took nearly three years for both barriers to be dismantled and for the river to once again flow freely. Over the course of their nearly century-long lives, the two dams collected more than 24 million cubic yards of sediment behind them, enough to fill the Seattle Seahawks football stadium eight times. And since their removal, the Elwha has taken back the trapped sediment and distributed it downstream, causing the riverine ecosystem to be rebuilt and transformed. Massive quantities of silt, sand, and gravel have been carried to the coast, resurrecting a wetlands ...
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Confirmed: Trump Trashing Rules To Protect Students From Predatory Colleges 14.6.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
It is now confirmed : Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos are trashing the Obama rules created to protect students and taxpayers from scam for-profit colleges. The purpose of these rules is to determine which career training programs are actually helping students build careers, and channel taxpayer dollars to those schools, rather than to overpriced, low-quality schools that are systematically deceiving and ripping off students. For-profit colleges have donated big money to the GOP , Trump owned one , DeVos invested in them. An executive from predatory Bridgepoint Education, Robert Eitel,  now works at the Department of Education. The for-profit college industry has relentlessly opposed the Obama rules, spending millions of our tax dollars to hire lawyers and lobbyists to try to defeat them. Now they appear to have prevailed. This is blatant corruption of policy by a predatory industry, one that has faced numerous law enforcement investigations for fraud. This is the opposite of draining the swamp. Under Trump, ...
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