User: flenvcenter Topic: Water-Independent
Category: Water Quality :: Wetlands
Last updated: Sep 10 2019 15:29 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Trump Picks a Big Pharma Profiteer 28.11.2017 Truthout.com
Help preserve a news source with integrity at its core: Donate to the independent media at Truthout. Donald Trump has nominated yet another corporate swamp creature, this time to run the agency that oversees public health. Alex Azar, a former executive and lobbyist for pharma giant Eli Lilly, is Trump's pick to be Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Former HHS Secretary Tom Price resigned in September amid charges that he had taken private planes costing more than $400,000 instead of using commercial air travel. HHS contains 11 divisions, including the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (which also runs Obamacare and the Children's Health Insurance Program), the Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control. Azar's nomination follows a Trump administration pattern of filling government posts with private industry executives -- like Secretary of State/former ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson and Treasury Secretary/former Goldman Sachs executive Steve ...
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Researchers pin down one source of a potent greenhouse gas 21.11.2017 Environmental News Network
A study of a Lake Erie wetland suggests that scientists have vastly underestimated the number of places methane-producing microbes can survive—and, as a result, today’s global climate models may be misjudging the amount of methane being released into the atmosphere.
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Peatland Plants Adapting Well to Climate Change, Suggests Study 28.10.2017 Environmental News Network
They account for just three per cent of the Earth’s surface but play a major role in offsetting carbon dioxide emissions – and now a team of scientists led by the universities of Southampton and Utrecht has discovered that the plants that make up peat bogs adapt exceptionally well to climate change.
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Study tells of pumpkin-colored zombies 11.10.2017 Global Health and Wellness News - ENN
Reducing nutrient pollution may help prevent human disease
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How Many More "500-Year Storms" Will People Endure Before They Start Abandoning Coastal Cities? 1.10.2017 Truthout.com
Damaged homes and streets littered with debris are seen after Hurricane Irma passed through the area on September 13, 2017, in Ramrod Key, Florida. (Photo: Joe Raedle / Getty Images) People love living near the coast. Only two of the world's top 10 biggest cities -- Mexico City and Sáo Paulo -- are not coastal. The rest -- Tokyo, Mumbai, New York, Shanghai, Lagos, Los Angeles, Calcutta and Buenos Aires -- are. Around half of the world's 7.5 billion people live within  60 miles  of a coastline, with about 10 percent of the population living in coastal areas that are less than 10 meters (32 feet) above sea level. Coastal migration has been steadily trending upward. In the U.S. alone, coastal county populations increased by  39 percent  between 1970 to 2010. As the population skyrockets -- from 7.5 billion today to 9.8 billion by 2050, and 11.2 billion by 2100, according to a recent United Nations  report  -- the question for sustainability and development experts is, will the world's coasts bear the burden ...
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Questions Over The Trump Administration's Travel Spending Won't End With Tom Price 30.9.2017 Politics on HuffingtonPost.com
Trump may have promised to “drain the swamp,” but several Cabinet secretaries appear to fit right in.
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Untamed Travel Possibilities for your imagination or your future plans. 26.9.2017 The Earth Times Online Newspaper - Health News
Where will you wander? The world may be becoming smaller but there are many spots to choose from if you love to explore. A new book reveals many possibilities for those who hanker after a getaway. Whether you imagine shivering in the Antarctic or sweltering in a swamp, this is the ideas factory for you.
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How the restoration economy can help us withstand the next hurricane 25.9.2017 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
The vicious spate of recent hurricanes shows how vulnerable low-lying islands and cities are becoming. Yet these tools can help to develop green infrastructure to navigate this new reality.
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A military legacy loosens its grip on a landscape 21.9.2017 High Country News Most Recent
Plans for Colorado’s Camp Hale balance restoration and commemoration.
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Ancient wetlands offer window into climate change 11.9.2017 Environmental News Network
Environmental researchers have uncovered a wealth of information about a unique part of Australia that offers never-before-seen insights into climate change since the last ice age.
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Trump administration erodes environmental protections 11.9.2017 High Country News Most Recent
The courts have slowed some rollbacks but many have moved ahead.
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China's 'sponge cities' aim to reuse most rainwater 11.9.2017 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
It's an ambitious plan to arrest urban flooding, but can it overcome local constraints?
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As Hurricanes Intensify, So Does Resistance to Big Oil in the Gulf 10.9.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Louisiana-based organizer Cherri Foytlin addresses a crowd of protesters at Energy Transfer Partners corporate headquarters in Dallas, Texas. Indigenous and environmental activists from across the country demonstrated against the company's pipeline projects, including the Bayou Bridge Pipeline, which would carry oil from east Texas across the sensitive wetlands of southern Louisiana. (Photo: Ethan Buckner / Earthworks) Petrochemical facilities in south Texas released millions of pounds of dangerously toxic chemicals like benzene, hexane and toluene in the wake of Hurricane Harvey. For environmentalists and indigenous activists in the Gulf South, where sea levels are rising and precious wetlands that protect against floods and storm surges are disappearing, resisting Big Oil is becoming a matter of survival. Louisiana-based organizer Cherri Foytlin addresses a crowd of protesters at Energy Transfer Partners corporate headquarters in Dallas, Texas, on Friday. Indigenous and environmental activists from ...
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Menominee Tribe Seeks Stricter Federal Oversight in Michigan Mine Fight 3.9.2017 Truthout - All Articles
In its continued fight against a mine near sacred waters, the Menominee Indians of Wisconsin want stronger federal regulations to apply as officials weigh the final permit for mine approval. At issue is the Back Forty mine, a proposed 83-acre open pit gold, zinc and copper mine in the southwestern corner of Michigan's Upper Peninsula. The mine would sit within 150 feet of the Menominee River, which forms the Michigan-Wisconsin border -- and is namesake for the Menominee Tribe across the border in Wisconsin. Environmental Health News highlighted the Menominee's fight last year in "Sacred Water," a national look at how culturally significant water resources -- both on and off reservation -- get sullied, destroyed, defaced by activities often happening beyond Native Americans' control. The mine was on track for approval but has been stagnant, as it still needs one permit -- a wetlands permit -- before beginning operation. The state of Michigan has controlled permitting to this point. This week the Menominee ...
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Why the big mitigation bankers are embracing ecological restoration 24.8.2017 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Mitigation banking is in the spotlight as a new group emerges and a leading trade association renames itself.
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Destruction of small wetlands directly linked to algal blooms in Great Lakes 19.8.2017 Environmental News Network
Canada’s current wetland protection efforts have overlooked how the environment naturally protects fresh-water resources from agricultural fertilizer contaminants, researchers from the University of Waterloo have found.In a recent study, researchers at Waterloo’s Faculty of Science and Faculty of Engineering found that small wetlands have a more significant role to play than larger ones in preventing excess nutrients like nitrogen and phosphorus from fertilizer from reaching waterbodies such as the Great Lakes.
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Planting Resilience to Climate Change 6.8.2017 Truthout - All Articles
Aurelia Arzú inspects the cocoplum patch and reaches in to pluck the ripest fruits. It’s early in the year, and the season is just beginning, so the bush is loaded with edible, plum-sized fruit ripening from yellow to pink in the unrelenting afternoon sun. Arzú bites into the cocoplum, quite literally eating the fruits of her labor. Together with other local Garifuna women, she planted cocoplum, seagrape, and other native coastal plants on and around the sand dunes in an effort to halt their advance and prevent further displacement of Santa Rosa de Aguán community residents. Aurelia Arzú inspects a cocoplum bush planted by local Garifuna women, selecting the ripest fruit to eat. (Photo: Sandra Cuffe) "It fills me with pride to see this and to know that the women helped protect our community," says Arzú, looking out at the burgeoning vegetation. Arzú's footprints crisscross the sandy expanse, tracing a path from the Caribbean Sea lapping at the northern coast of Honduras to the dunes now dotted with ...
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Goldman Sachs, Calvert bet on next big thing for green investments 1.8.2017 GreenBiz.com
Impact investing is set for staggering growth. Here's a closer look at the role of environmental impact bonds.
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Insuring nature, ensuring resilience 1.8.2017 GreenBiz.com
Market-based strategies only go so far. These new types of products can protect and restore ecosystems in peril.
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'Invasive' species have been around much longer than believed 31.7.2017 Environmental News Network
The DST-NRF Centre of Excellence for Palaeoscience funded researchers based in the School of Geography, Archaeology and Environmental Studies and in the Evolutionary Studies Institute of the University of the Witwatersrand have used fossil pollen records to solve an on-going debate regarding invasive plant species in eastern Lesotho.
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