User: flenvcenter Topic: Water-Independent
Category: Resource Management :: Wells
Last updated: Apr 25 2018 19:11 IST RSS 2.0
 
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4 net-zero energy lessons from Colorado 25.4.2018 Energy & Climate | Greenbiz.com
The John Madden Company reveals its journey to cut energy by 30 percent and stay cost neutral for buildings in its portfolio.
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People Have to Strengthen the Laws Protecting Our Water 24.4.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Residents of Flint, Michigan, have been told that the state that poisoned their drinking water will no longer provide them free bottled water. Meanwhile, Michigan approved a permit letting the Nestlé Corporation pump more fresh water out of the Great Lakes Basin to bottle and sell for a profit.  (Photo: Pixabay ) Janine Jackson: It is impossible, really, not to connect two recent pieces of news: Residents of Flint, Michigan, have been  told  that the state that  poisoned  their drinking water will no longer provide them free bottled water. They'll be going back to paying some of the highest prices in the country, some $200 a month, for water that may still be making them sick. The Washington Post  reports  at least 12,000 homes in Flint still waiting for replacement of lead pipes. At the same time, Michigan  approved  a permit letting the Nestlé Corporation pump more fresh water out of a well in the Great Lakes Basin to bottle and sell at a profit, more than half a million gallons a day, the right to ...
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Canary in the Coal Pond 23.4.2018 Truthout.com
New reports provide an unprecedented look at contaminants leaking from coal ash ponds and landfills. But the chasm between information and environmental protection may deepen thanks to a proposed Trump administration rollback that would lessen the consequences and weaken requirements for polluting power plants. Coal ash slurry pours into the first of two settling ponds adjacent to the Riverbend Steam Station on Mountain Island Lake in Gaston County, North Carolina, January 23, 2008. (Photo: Jeff Willhelm / Charlotte Observer / MCT via Getty Images) In tests conducted in late 2017, one in three coal-fired power plants nationwide detected "statistically significant" amounts of contaminants, including harmful chemicals like arsenic, in the groundwater around their facilities. This information, which utility companies had to post on their websites in March, became public for the first time under an Obama-era environmental rule regulating coal ash, the waste generated from burning coal. Mixed with water and ...
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Forests as a climate solution? Yes, naturally 17.4.2018 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
Sponsored: Forests clean air and water, provide economic well-being, support biodiversity, provide forest products that people depend on — and serve as the world’s oldest carbon storage technology. That’s worth talking about.
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How cities can fight global water insecurity 16.4.2018 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Utilities can implement a variety of demand management strategies to water the world's concrete jungles.
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Zapatista Women Inspire the Fight Against Patriarchy 14.4.2018 Truthout.com
Ready to challenge injustice and spark real change? So are we. Support Truthout's mission today by making a tax-deductible donation. Zapatista women take the stage to deliver their speeches collectively from each Caracol, or administrative center. (Photo: WNV/Shirin Hess) Dawn had only just broken over the mountains. While most of the women and children on the camping grounds were still asleep, others were already wide awake, huddling together in the first rays of sunlight and drinking coffee. To a casual observer, this place might have seemed similar to any mainstream festival campsite. A distinguishing factor, however, was that there wasn't a single man in sight. The sign on the main entrance left no one in doubt that only women and children were welcome at this event: "Men not permitted to enter." Women's participation in Mexico's 25-year-old Zapatista National Liberation Army, or EZLN movement, has represented an incredible organizational achievement since its original uprising in 1994. On ...
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4 reasons fewer employees are engaged in sustainability, and what to do about it 6.4.2018 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
It's a troubling trend, but reversing it should be fairly straightforward.
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The shared city movement is paving the way to a better future 5.4.2018 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
Tom Llewellyn, coordinator of the Sharing Cities Network, discusses how local solutions can tackle global problems.
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Pentagon Plans for Three-Front "Long War" Against China and Russia 3.4.2018 Truthout.com
Sailors inspect the landing gear of an F/A-18F Super Hornet on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt. (Photo: Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Spencer Roberts / US Navy ) Think of it as the most momentous military planning on Earth right now. Who's even paying attention, given the eternal  changing of the guard  at the White House, as well as the latest in tweets,  sexual revelations , and  investigations  of every sort? And yet it increasingly looks as if, thanks to current Pentagon planning, a twenty-first-century version of the Cold War (with dangerous new twists) has begun and hardly anyone has even noticed.  In 2006, when the Department of Defense spelled out its future security role, it saw only one overriding mission: its "Long War" against international terrorism. "With its allies and partners, the United States must be prepared to wage this war in many locations simultaneously and for some years to come," the Pentagon's Quadrennial Defense Review  explained  that ...
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Can the healthcare sector match big tech in going 100 percent renewable? 3.4.2018 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Hospital, heal thyself.
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Weapons for Anyone: Donald Trump and the Art of the Arms Deal 2.4.2018 Truthout - All Articles
(Photo: Michael Colley / EyeEm / Getty Images) It's one of those stories of the century that somehow never gets treated that way. For an astounding 25 of the past 26 years, the United States has been the leading arms dealer  on the planet, at some moments in near  monopolistic  fashion. Its major weapons-producers, including Boeing, Raytheon, and Lockheed Martin, regularly pour the latest in high-tech arms and munitions into the most explosive areas  of the planet with ample  assistance  from the Pentagon. In recent years, the  bulk  of those arms have gone to the Greater Middle East. Donald Trump is only the latest American president to preside over a global arms sales bonanza. With remarkable enthusiasm, he's appointed himself America's number one weapons salesman and he couldn't be prouder of the job he's doing. Earlier this month, for instance, on the very day Congress was debating whether to end US support for Saudi Arabia's  brutal war  in Yemen, Trump engaged in one of his favorite presidential ...
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Nations Won't Reach Paris Climate Goal Without Protecting Wildlife and Nature, Warns Report 2.4.2018 Truthout - All Articles
A sweeping new report emphasizes just how intertwined the challenges of climate change and loss of biodiversity truly are. The Paris Climate Agreement and several other United Nations (UN) pacts "all depend on the health and vitality of our natural environment in all its diversity and complexity," said Dr. Anne Larigauderie, executive secretary of the UN-backed organization behind the report. "Acting to protect and promote biodiversity is at least as important to achieving these commitments and to human well-being as is the fight against global climate change." The report comes from the efforts of more than 550 scientists in over 100 nations, corralled by an organization often dubbed "the IPCC for biodiversity." Much like the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) assesses the state of research on global warming and its impacts, the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) reviews the best-available science on biodiversity and nature's ...
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Black Student Protesters in Chicago Are Denied Access to Public Restrooms at City Hall 30.3.2018 Truthout.com
On Wednesday, dozens of predominantly Black school students at Chicago's City Hall were offered a painful reminder of the systemic injustices that previous generations of Black activists had fought against. While participating in actions to protest against the proposed $95 million police training facility, they were denied access to food and public restrooms. Chicago student organizers stage a die-in at Chicago's City Hall on Wednesday to protest a proposed police academy facility. Students created cardboard headstones in memory of people killed by police as well as community hubs, such as schools and clinics, that have been shuttered under Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel. (Photo: Sarah-Ji) It's spring break for Chicago's public school students, and some of the city's young people are taking the opportunity to protest. This week, dozens of high school and middle school students from the city's South and West Sides have participated in a series of actions to demand that Chicago's City Council halt the proposed ...
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U.S. Superfund sites offer lessons for the future 30.3.2018 GreenBiz.com
Superfund sites are being repurposed as recreational areas, renewable energy facilities and more.
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Intel, Arizona Diamondbacks put water solutions on tap 27.3.2018 Design & Innovation | GreenBiz.com
More businesses are collaborating to tackle drought and other unique challenges.
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Why Wells Fargo's cleantech incubator is a hit 26.3.2018 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
The bank's Innovation Incubator has a secret weapon: a national laboratory.
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The big idea behind corporate desalination projects 22.3.2018 Small Business | GreenBiz.com
New technologies are radically reducing plant construction costs and, as a result, the total cost of water.
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We Are All Fast Food Workers Now 21.3.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Truthout is funded by readers, not by corporations, lobbyists or government interests. Help us publish more stories like this one: Click here to make a tax-deductible donation! "Many people are angered by the cruelties of the twenty-first-century economy. And their fury has fueled worldwide protest. Simultaneously, and almost everywhere, low-wage workers and small farmers began to revolt: in New York City restaurants, laundries, and warehouses, in Western Cape wineries and the garment shops of Phnom Penh, in Southern California Walmarts, and the big hotels of Providence, Oslo, Karachi, and Abuja. As capital has globalized, so has the labor movement. Marches, strikes, protests, and sit-ins from Tampa to Mali have changed the global conversation about workers' rights." So writes Annelise Orleck in her new book We Are All Fast Food Workers Now: The Global Uprising Against Poverty Wages -- which, as she explains on this week's episode of Off-Kilter, tells the story behind the growing global labor movement ...
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We must act fast to stop the threat to groundwater aquifer in Ontario 20.3.2018 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Mark Calzavara The world's purest groundwater is under threat again -- this time from a gravel pit expansion in the Waverly Uplands, the recharge area for a pristine aquifer in Simcoe County, Ontario. Dufferin Aggregates has applied for a 10-year permit to take water at Teedon Pit, which is located just east of the lands that almost became Dump Site 41 back in 2009. That landfill proposal was defeated at the 11th hour, and there is very little time left to stop this current threat. Expanding the Teedon Pit means cutting down the trees, stripping away the soil, and scooping out the gravel and stone that together make up the "filter" that keeps the groundwater so pure. The company intends to store asphalt and other construction materials on the site, increasing the risk of contamination to the aquifer, and extract millions of litres of water every day in order to wash the gravel. Tell the Ontario government to reject this 10-year permit application and protect this critical aquifer recharge area forever. ...
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In the Midst of Worldwide Water Scarcity, an Artist Reminds Us, "We Are Water" 19.3.2018 Truthout - All Articles
Installing "Desert Fountain" at the Albuquerque Museum. (Photo: Basia Irland) As anthropogenic climate disruption and human development progress, rivers are drying up and water scarcity has become the new norm. This climate dispatch features author, poet, sculptor and installation artist Basia Irland, whose work and activism eloquently weave in the critical threads of conservation and education, along with her reverence for water and its role in life and on Earth. Installing "Desert Fountain" at the Albuquerque Museum. (Photo: Basia Irland)As a journalist and author covering anthropogenic climate disruption (ACD), when I write about what is happening in the liquid realms of the biosphere, my focus tends to be on how rapidly certain parts of the cryosphere are melting. Additionally, sea level rise, thermal expansion of the oceans, floods and droughts are what tend to make it into my  Climate Disruption Dispatches  and my book. Hence, I, like most of us, tend to overlook the most blatantly obvious place ...
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