User: flenvcenter Topic: Water-Independent
Category: Policy
Last updated: May 15 2019 20:17 IST RSS 2.0
 
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The key to endangered species recovery? Communication. 15.5.2019 High Country News Most Recent
A retired federal biologist says Trump’s Interior Department is more business as usual than critics claim.
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How do tribal nation’s treaties figure into climate change? 14.5.2019 High Country News Most Recent
U.S. courts rarely favor environmental protections as a right — except when it comes to tribes expressing their treaty rights.
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We’re destroying the biodiversity we depend on 6.5.2019 High Country News Most Recent
A new U.N. study shows that up to 1 million species risk extinction because humans use up nature much faster than it can be replenished.
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Western forests have a ‘fire debt’ problem 3.5.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Planned burns can reduce wildfire risks, but expanding use of ‘good fire’ isn’t easy.
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The drive to embed 'planetary health' impacts within corporate sustainability strategy 2.5.2019 Resource Efficiency | GreenBiz.com
Although more companies are making the connection, few are addressing this collision strategically.
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What a Denver suburb can teach the West about water 1.5.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Westminster, Colorado, is a model for integrating water data into planning.
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Trump’s infrastructure order threatens local right to protect the environment 24.4.2019 High Country News Most Recent
Washington blocked a coal terminal under the Clean Water Act. New rules could subvert that authority.
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How a tiny endangered species put a man in prison 15.4.2019 Current Issue
The Devils Hole pupfish is nothing to mess with.
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Trump administration rubber stamps Arizona copper mine 12.4.2019 High Country News Most Recent
An industry-friendly ruling contradicts years of concerns over potential damage to endangered species, water systems and Native American cultural sites.
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How the water justice movement is challenging extractivism in Canada 11.4.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Emma Lui I recently gave a  keynote presentation about the water justice movement's fight against commodification and extractivism at the Perspectives of Power conference organized by the Institute of Political Economy at Carleton University. This blog is part two of a three-part blog series based on my presentation ( read part one here ). It gives an overview of some water justice issues and how grassroots groups, Indigenous nations, communities and organizations are working to protect water.  In Wellington County, Nestlé has been pumping up to 4.7 million litres on two expired permits. When Nestlé purchased a third well in Elora, Ontario, there was public outcry because the local township of Centre Wellington needs the well for its drinking water. Nestlé's water takings also raise questions about water justice because Six Nations of the Grand River is downstream from Nestlé and 90 per cent of the population does not have access to clean water. Last fall, Makasa Lookinghorse and other Six Nations youth ...
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The Peaceful Resistance of La Puya fights for the right to water 10.4.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Brent Patterson Residents from the communities of San José del Golfo and San Pedro Ayampuc -- an area known as La Puya -- have been fighting against the Progreso VII Derivada-El Tambor gold mine located just north of Guatemala City since March 2010. The Peaceful Resistance of La Puya, which is made up of members from these communities, has stated, "[The environmental impact assessment] shows that the gold and silver are contained in arsenopyrite rock, which contains high levels of arsenic. Levels of arsenic in the water increased considerably during the time the mine was in operation." They have also expressed concern about the massive amount of water the mine would use in their water-scarce region. Their struggle to defend water has seen a blockade of the mine site, repression and criminalization, a win at the Guatemalan Supreme Court, and now a challenge at the Washington, D.C.–based World Bank Group's International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes. A timeline may be the clearest way to ...
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The declining impact of 'bozo eruptions' -- are Albertans the proverbial frog in a pot of boiling water? 9.4.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
David J. Climenhaga Have Albertans grown so inured to Conservative "bozo eruptions" they no longer have much impact? To put that another way, have we grown so accustomed to the "lake of fire" that we imagine we can bathe in it comfortably without putting on an asbestos swimsuit? That's likely at least part of the story behind the most recent pre-election polls in Alberta , which suggest that with the provincial election now only a week away, the United Conservative Party led by Jason Kenney is by and large maintaining the lead it has held over Premier Rachel Notley's NDP. Duncan Kinney of Progress Alberta argued in a CBC commentary over the weekend that Albertans are much more progressive than Canadians from elsewhere give them credit for being -- or than we often do ourselves. There are more millennials than boomers here now, he pointed out. University enrolment is way up. Alberta's population is diverse and growing more diverse -- in the next 20 years the majority of Calgarians won't be white. And most ...
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Arms industry a significant force in the suppression of Indigenous peoples 8.4.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Brent Patterson The weapons industry plays a significant role in the ongoing oppression of Indigenous peoples. The weapons that are used by the military, para-military groups and police against Indigenous peoples are manufactured, bought, sold, provided as aid and generate profit. They are used to suppress territorial sovereignty and to contain struggles in defence of land and water. Historically, Popular Mechanics has noted, "The U.S. Army used the Gatling [manual machine gun that could fire 200 rounds per minute] extensively throughout the 1870s during its campaigns against Native American tribes in the West." In more recent times, a mine-resistant, ambush-protected (MRAP) armoured vehicle was deployed by police against Indigenous land and water defenders opposed to the Dakota Access Pipeline on their territories in North Dakota. In this country, tanks, Grizzly infantry fighting vehicles, trucks and artillery pieces were deployed in and around Kanehsatà:ke and Kahnawake during the Oka Crisis in 1990. ...
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Will Congress leave the Colorado River high and dry? 4.4.2019 High Country News Most Recent
After months of negotiations, seven basin states wait for Congressional approval.
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Oil industry leaders marvel at their access to Interior 26.3.2019 High Country News Most Recent
‘We have unprecedented access to people that are in these positions who are trying to help us, which is great.’
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Vancouver mining company Eco Oro sues Colombia over protection of Santurbán wetland 26.3.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Brent Patterson Vancouver-based mining company Eco Oro Minerals Corp. has long pursued its Angostura gold and silver mine project located in Santander Department (province) in Colombia. The mine would have been situated in the Santurbán Páramo, a high-altitude wetland ecosystem that serves as a vital source of drinking water for approximately two million people in the city of Bucaramanga and surrounding areas. It's helpful to review a timeline of the controversial project. The history of it goes back to 1994 when Eco Oro (then called Greystar Resources) began their exploration in the area. The Center for International Environmental Law (CIEL) notes, "Eco Oro's initial interest in the Angostura mine project came in the midst of then-president Alvaro Uribe's decision to grant foreign companies limited exploratory mining permits." CIEL has also noted, "These permits allow for exploration but not extraction unless environmental permits are granted." It highlights, "Colombian law prohibits mining within ...
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The decarbonization ideals underlying the Green New Deal are not unattainable 26.3.2019 GreenBiz.com
Massive electrification will bring about a new American abundance.
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What We Know About Fossil Fuels 30 Years After The Exxon Valdez Oil Spill 24.3.2019 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The largely invisible impacts of long-term fossil fuel extraction were beginning to surface.
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The Trump Team And The Problem That Shall Not Be Named 22.3.2019 Green on HuffingtonPost.com
The administration wants to tackle environmental crises like unsafe drinking water and extreme wildfire. But it won’t talk about that one key driver.
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The water justice movement's fight against commodification and extractivism 19.3.2019 rabble.ca - News for the rest of us
Emma Lui Last month, I gave a keynote presentation called "Come Hell or High Water: The Water Justice Movement's Fight Against Commodificaton and Extractivism ." The presentation was part of  the Institute of Political Economy's 20th Annual Grad Conference at Carleton University. The conference theme was "Perspectives of Power," and speakers where asked to grapple with questions like: how is power manufactured and deployed? How is power contested, transformed and embodied?Panel topics included labour, (de)colonization, inequality and food.  This blog is part one of a three-part blog series based on my presentation at this conference. This part includes an overview of the water justice movement in Canada and the ways in which power is manufactured and deployed in water governance. Water is a cross-cutting issue among many social movements in Canada and in Indigenous nations. The water justicement movement here is diverse and includes grassroots groups, individual activists, Indigenous nations and groups, ...
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